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What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!

COW Library : Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate : Walter Biscardi : What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
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CreativeCOW presents What a Long, Strange Year It's Been! -- Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate Feature


Biscardi Creative Media
Buford Georgia USA

©2012 CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


Apple imploding. Adobe ascending. Avid opening up. Who could have seen it coming? Here's Walter's look at what happens when the blinders come off.



Editor's note:
Walter Biscardi has been part of Creative COW since before there was a COW, in its prior incarnation. He holds the record for most posts at CreativeCOW.net, coming up on 24,000 of them. His article "FCPX: What Pros Find Missing in Final Cut Pro X" is one of the most popular in the past six months at the COW, with another co-written by Richard Harrington called "Why We Can't Use Final Cut Pro X at Our Companies" right behind it.

In addition to his many articles and blog posts, it has been a pleasure reading hundreds of articulate posts from Walter on these issues.

That's why we've asked him to crystallize his perspectives, both the ones he's already written, and the ones he continues to develop as he works with Adobe Premiere Pro, Avid Media Composer, and Apple Final Cut Pro every day in an expanding facility.

We also asked him to write this because we knew that he'd call 'em as he sees 'em, nothing held back. His opinions are his own of course, and we welcome them without filtering.

We see that Walter has earned his position of respect at the very top of the industry because of the way he roots his strong opinions in real-world experience. Even the people who don't agree with him read what he writes because they want to come along for the ride.

Buckle up for Walter's view of the long strange trip that this year has been.




Until April of 2011 it all seemed too easy. Avid was on the ropes, Adobe was an afterthought, and Apple was on the way to world dominance with Final Cut Pro. In the 18 months leading up to NAB 2011, Apple had the most incredible run of momentum that the industry had ever witnessed. All they had to do was deliver the knockout punch with an enhanced Final Cut Studio 4.

Because the post production community is kinda small, I had a pretty darn good idea of what we were going to see when Final Cut Pro X was unveiled, but I thought, "I have to see it to believe it." It was hard for me to fathom that Apple was going to take 12 years of professional software development and start over with essentially version 1.0. What we saw was even worse than expected: it was clear the tool was aimed squarely to a much more mass market, consumer / hobbyist audience than the post production market.

A complete reboot is a fine decision for a consumer-focused product, a movie franchise, or even a videogame franchise, but the professional world responded with a resounding, "Let's see what else is out there." Or more accurately and concisely, they responded with a resounding "WTF?"

Make no mistake. Apple released EXACTLY the software they intended to release. This was not merely a "1.0 and we'll add things back to it later." This was years in the making, and what we saw in April of 2011, and what Apple released in June, is precisely what Apple felt was going to change the post production industry for the better.

From a business perspective, Final Cut Pro X presents some significant challenges. First, everything about it is different from the industry norm. As a concept, that's not necessarily a bad thing, but when you go so far as to even change all the terminology, that creates problems, particularly with media management that completely and utterly changes what we have considered "a project" to be for all these years.

Also, the creative field is a collaborative one. With FCPX's closed architecture it was not possible, for example, to send a project to Pro Tools for sound mix. For those who say "Well, Apple is going to put it all back," my response is, "It should have never been removed in the first place if this was truly designed for professionals."

FCPX was released with zero support for industry-standard external hardware. Those AJA, Blackmagic and Matrox products just didn't work upon release. And what's the point of having industry-standard reference monitors and sound equipment if we can't connect to them?

FCPX was released with zero support for any project created in earlier versions of Final Cut Pro, and no way to move those projects forward -- a HUGE issue for our clients who need projects revised, which happens quite regularly.

Now, big changes are not necessarily a bad thing. In the 11 years of FCP, we've switched from analog to digital to HD to 2K to 4K. We've had to adjust our workflows all along the way to ensure that we meet the ever-changing demands of our broadcast television and independent film clients. We've had to endure an endless array of digital formats coming out on almost a weekly basis, but as pros, we look for a natural progression that incorporates new ideas without completely throwing out what we have already learned when using earlier versions of these very products.

A colleague said it best when he said he just doesn't trust Apple any longer with his professional career. They released the software they fully intended to release, and they can turn around and change everything again at any time.

Apple singlehandedly changed the course of post production from poised to become completely dominated by Apple hardware and Final Cut Pro, to reintroducing the bulk of the industry to Adobe Premiere Pro and Avid Media Composer.

Once we really looked at the other tools and saw things we liked, that even opened up the discussion about hardware. As a business owner, do I want to be locked down to an Apple platform that is clearly now a consumer brand, or do I align myself with cross platform tools that open my company up to nearly infinite options moving forward?



ADOBE PREMIERE PRO
When folks started looking elsewhere, it was clear that Adobe Premiere Pro CS 5.5 was sitting in the catbird seat. It was essentially the Final Cut Pro 8 many of us were hoping for, especially if you selected the included option to switch the keyboard shortcuts to match Final Cut Pro 7 (very clever of Adobe to add).

But the BIG reason why Adobe was sitting so pretty was the external hardware support. Pretty much anything that worked with Final Cut Pro also worked with Adobe Premiere Pro: AJA, Blackmagic, Matrox and more all just worked with Adobe Premiere Pro. So switching to that product was as simple as clicking a different software icon -- yeah, that's the little Premiere Pro icon many of us have had installed on our machines all these years as part of the Creative Suite but never bothered to click. Final Cut Pro X gave us a really good reason to try it out.

Here's the thing. While as a whole it works very similarly to FCP 7, and, unlike FCPX, you can import your FCP 7 projects, there are a lot of little things about Premiere that are very annoying -- track assignments, audio, even project setup. But instead of telling simply telling us to deal with it and learn the "Adobe way," I've found a very open and humble product team that instead says "Yeah, these things suck and we know we need to fix them, but in the meantime, have you played with these other things that we think are pretty cool?" The Adobe team seems genuinely excited to have so many folks just naturally progressing over to their software. They're very eager to take our input and move the entire product line forward.

It's a delicate balance because they don't want to upset long time Premiere Pro users (who would do that?), while improving the product for so many coming from Final Cut Pro.

Beyond just Premiere Pro, Adobe has the full suite of products that many production professionals prefer. No one "super app" can ever match the toolset and flexibility of an entire suite. I don't care how much power you put into that "super app," a suite of products dedicated to graphic design, special effects, video editing, color enhancement, photo manipulation, audio production and even web design will always give you more options.

At the end of the day, I want the most options for my available at my fingertips rather than having to say, "Well, that's all we can do with this application." The suite is one area where Adobe clearly has Avid beat, particularly with the addition of IRIDAS SpeedGrade to the CS toolset. It will be interesting to see by NAB 2012 how that product is integrated into CS 6.



AVID MEDIA COMPOSER...Avid kept their promise.

I've told part of this story before, but now I can tell you the rest.

I was invited to an Avid breakfast event at NAB, ironically, the morning of Apple's FCPX unveiling. What I expected was some sort of marketing presentation to anywhere from several dozen to 100 folks. What I got was 25 minutes at a small table for 10 with CEO Gary Greenfield, Senior VP Ron Greenberg, CTO Tim Claman, Senior VP Chris Gahagan, Executive VP Ken Sexton, VP Christine Viera and Sales Manager Luke Smith and a few others.

That got my attention. In all my years running Final Cut Pro, I never even had a one on one meeting with anyone on the FCP team.

Mr. Greenfield started by saying nothing was off the table, ask the team anything I want. Naturally, the first request was "Open up the Avid to my AJA Kona boards." Rather than a straight answer, they kept reiterating that "we're listening to our users," but even as they tiptoed around, it was clear that Media Composer would be more open. Supporting AJA products just made sense, since the two companies have a long history of working together -- even if nobody would come out and say it directly at that breakfast.

As the meeting ended and we were shaking hands, Mr. Greenberg leaned to me and said, "We'll have you in an Avid before the end of the year." Now mind you, I'm the guy who spent 10 years telling the editing world you DON'T need to use Avid. Save money and use Final Cut Pro! And here is the CEO of Avid telling me straight out, my AJA Kona board will be working with the next version of Media Composer, AND it will be out before the end of 2011.

You see why I could not say anything publicly about this until now. But with the release of Avid Media Composer 6, Mr. Greenberg and Avid have kept their promise.

We've tested Media Composer 6 with the AJA Kona 3 so far, and I can report that the AJA Kona 3 works better with Media Composer 6 than it ever did with Final Cut Pro. This was also a different experience than the current sluggishness with Kona in Adobe CS5.5, which I expect to improve when Adobe CS6 is released, but at the moment, the Kona boards are running in Media Composer as if the support has always been there. Performance is simply outstanding, much snappier than what I'm used to in FCP.

I have not tested with Blackmagic or Matrox products, but I'm told that they are working with Media Composer 6 as well.

Storage was the make or break decision maker for me and Avid. Avid has traditionally been very closed with their storage solutions. You used Avid storage or nothing at all. That has been changing slowly over the past few years but in our case, we're running an Ethernet-based shared storage system from Small Tree Communications: 48TB shared to up to 12 workstations all connected via Ethernet, with no management software controlling the SAN.

We have not pushed the system at all yet, but early indications are promising. We will be doing much heavier testing this week, but the fact that our Ethernet SAN is available in Media Composer at all is a huge step forward for Avid opening up their software to many more storage solutions.



THINKING ABOUT THE UNTHINKABLE: WINDOWS!
I'm about as hardcore a Mac user as I know. I own pretty much every product Apple makes. I purchase Mac Pro configurations that run anywhere from $5500 - $8500 when I upgrade, and have probably spent in excess of $300,000 or more over the 10 years of my business on Apple-related hardware and software.

Now I'm doing what I would have considered unthinkable at the beginning of this year. I'm considering Windows 7 workstations to replace our aging Mac Pros to run Adobe and Avid. We have a copy of Windows 7 in our shop that I originally intended to install into a Mac Pro, but now I'm looking at the hardware from other companies as well.

It doesn't mean that I love the thought of going to computers that run Windows, because after all, there aren't that many of them that are beautifully designed like Macs. As much we love the OS, we also really love the touch and feel of an Apple product. Steve Jobs knew that external appearance was as important as the internal workings. People had to want the device for their home or office, but Windows boxes have been pretty ugly and flimsy.

Of course, we use "headless" systems in our shop, that is, a box that sits in a machine room. The editor and client will still get the experience of working in a very nice edit suite, with all the comforts they expect. The only difference will be the operating system on the computer itself tucked away in the machine room.

We have not put a full Windows 7 test workstation in my facility just yet, but we will very soon. I'm working with my VAR to get a demo workstation in so we can run this on our SAN and do a true comparison to Adobe / Avid running in the Windows environment alongside our Mac Pros.

Yes, I said alongside our Mac Pros. I'm not going to simply throw away 10 Mac Pros in one fell swoop. That would be crazy. I will make a slow transition over to Windows as we replace the boxes, one at a time. And even there, we most likely won't replace every single Mac with Windows. Just having the ability to choose one workstation or the other based on NEED, and not just on software requirement, is absolutely huge for my bottom line. Going Adobe / Avid allows us to break some of the tethers to just one company.

The interesting thing about all of this is that I know I'm not alone. I'm sure when evaluating the expected response to Final Cut Pro X, Apple's internal discussions anticipated some users would leave the application -- but I suspect that they never expected so many people to be discussing leaving the Mac platform altogether.



OBSERVATIONS, MOVING FORWARD
It's absolutely unreal that we've gone through 12 years of a fairly steady arc of Final Cut Pro creation, foothold, acceptance and industry dominance -- and it all changed within a matter of months. It's startling to see so many people simply abandon Apple, regardless of what Apple does with FCPX after this.

Additionally:


  • For now, we're running Avid Media Composer 6, Adobe Premiere Pro CS 5.5.2 and FCP 7 all on the same machine (we actually have two machines that are both running all three of them), and we can even run them all the applications at the same time, all with the AJA Kona 3 boards.

  • I now prefer Avid DNxHD to Apple ProRes. The DNxHD codecs are lighter on our systems than ProRes, and we're really glad to see so many third party companies adding support for them.

  • For existing ProRes projects, we find that both Premiere and Media Composer can work with them, Media Composer does ProRes better. We determined in testing that running ProRes in Premiere with the AJA Kona bard requires an 8 core machine. However Media Composer can run ProRes nicely on a 4 core machine. We're really not sure why. Same machine, same Kona board, but there you go.

  • Avid has much more solid tape controls than Adobe at this time.

  • Both Premiere and Media Composer are faster than FCP 7. Both are 64-bit. Both are metadata rich. We have completed broadcast projects with both and the end product doesn't look any different.

  • If you're a freelancer, I HIGHLY recommend learning both Media Composer and Premiere. I can tell you that we will support Final Cut Pro 7, Adobe Creative Suite and Avid Media Composer in our shop because we're an independent post house and it makes sense to support all of them. As to what will be our primary editing tool, we'll make that decision in another week or so after more testing with the SAN.
In all of this, the debacle of FCPX has caused me to "lift the blinders" that kept me focused solely on Apple. There's a whole new world out there, and I am now open to accept the possibilities, no matter where these new opportunities come from.







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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Bil Chase
Final Cut was successful because there was an incredibly smart team of people that actually "GOT IT".

They had immense PASSION and actually cared about the product.
They listened to the users and welcomed input and feedback.
They were accessible.
They didn't bullshit us.

The question is: where'd they all go?

Things were SO MUCH BETTER when Paul Saccone and Bill Hudson were running the FINAL CUT show. Both these men were TRUE FINAL CUT GENIUSES, not only in a business sense for the killer marketing job they did, but also in an engineering sense as well.

Its RARE to find product managers who not only know how to effectively market their product, but also have real life, hands on, day to day, and in-depth actual experience with their product. The team THAT WAS; DID.

If Apple were smart, they'd go find them TODAY and beg them to fix the mess that is FCPX.

Bil
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Alex Hawkins
Excellent article Walter. Thanks so much for taking the time to write this.

Much appreciated.

Alex Hawkins
Canberra, Australia
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Doug Weiner
Walter, very good article. Thanks.

I am looking for some render speed comparisons of ProResHQ in Avid 6 and FCPX. (I know what it is in FCP7 and dealing with my sequences - its about 8x slower than real time.)

My situation:
Basically I have 15 minute or 30 minute ProResHQ sequences with ProResHQ Footage, a color effect on it (I use Colorista 1, and then an overlay with alpha on it (a bug) and a timecode burn.

I have played with FCPX a little, and didn't do a stopwatch test on it, but its was about 4-5 faster at rendering out these sequences. Of course I couldn't use Colorista in FCPx and used the color corrector in there.

I was wondering if you had any idea how Media Composer 6 would fare with ProRes or new of any people running some spec comparison tests.

Thanks
Doug
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
ProRes is still a non-native codec to Avid and it's a quicktime codec. Avid blazes through MXF so it's hard to really compare since Avid is in no way optimized to work with Quicktime codecs.

What we do is convert everything to Avid MXF because it's just so doggone fast to make the conversions.

Overall, the workflow is Avid and Adobe are both much faster than the workflow in FCP 7. I don't have a need for X so I couldn't tell you how that compares right now.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Adam Hain
Walter,
Great article! You, along with the other posts, have distilled a disappointing attitude in Apple towards their most devout, albeit less profitable market. As mentioned this may have a ripple effect in the years to come - as creatives using Macs inspired the DIY spirit of "prosumers" to buy their own Macs and software.
Realistically, if Apple no longer competes, Avid and Adobe will succeed. They make great products - as FCP has been for years.
Avid has had great success lowering the price of Pro Tools - and with Pro Tools 9 opening to different machines. Avid, Pro Tools (and the associated hardware) had been cost prohibitive for many compared to FCP. I have no problem switching to an open Avid, an Adobe suite or whatever works best for getting projects done.
Apple seems to have actually made it more difficult with FCP X! I don't want 3rd party plug-ins to do things I already did in FCP 7.
If this is Apple's attitude towards the post community, then Avid and Adobe have a chance to really wow this customer base and I think they will. I agree that it would be ill-fated to trust Apple at this point though.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Pat DeFilippo
I enjoyed your article and overall agree with it, Walter. I too would have like to have seen FCS4 with 64-bit and background rendering and other things Adobe already had.

I, too, am just finishing updating my edit suite to include FCS3, Avid MC5.5 and Adobe Production Premium CS5.5.

As of this morning (1/31/12), do you think that FCPX just got more appealing to professional editors with the 10.0.3 update that is now available? Multicam editing is back with PluralEyes-type plug-in features built-in, import from FCP7 is now possible via a third party app that now works due to re-added XML, and a better chroma keyer (Primatte RT possibly?) that eliminates the need to import from Motion and After Effects. They also have a beta for external monitoring and other upgrades.

It's not where it needs to be yet but, after 7 months of iMovie Pro, do you think FC"P"X is "professional" again?

A further question is, with FCPX 10.0.3, does Apple now finally have the release it needs to re-open their long abandoned booth at NAB to re-sell Final Cut to professional editors (like they first did a decade ago)?

You listed in an article several months ago specifically what Apple should never have taken out, and I do recall Multicam editing, XML and external monitoring were three major things (and you probably had chroma keying, too).

I haven't bothered with FCPX and instead have been investing in and re-learning Avid, but perhaps as of today it's worth another look?

G5 Quad Desktop with 4GB Ram, 750GB HD & eSata ~ 30" Cinema Display & 17" Sony SVGA
~ Swift Data 200 Internal 1.6TB SATA II RAID 0 ~
2.33gz Intel MacBook Pro with 3GB Ram, 500GB HD
AJA Io LA
Final Cut Studio 2 on G5 & 3 on MBP
Sony UVW-1800 Beta-SP
Sony DSR-40 DVCam

P D Post Productions, Inc.
TV~DVD~WEB-Device
for Corporate Communications, Commercials, Infomercials, Television Programs and Family Occasions since 1983
E-mail PD@PDPost.com
Website http://www.PDPost.com
Business/Cell Phone (847) 275-5671
@Pat DeFilippo
by Pat DeFilippo
I just updated my signature from what's posted...

* Final Cut Studio 3 with Bella keyboard
* Avid Media Composer 5.5 with Bella keyboard
* Adobe Production Premium CS 5.5 with Bella keyboard

Six-core 3.33ghz Mac Pro with 16GB RAM
~ 30" & 24" Apple Cinema Displays
~ AJA LHe with HDMI to 21" Sony Production Monitor and component I/O to Sony UVW-1800 Beta-SP deck
- ATTO Mini-SAS card
- ESata card
8TB G-Tech Es Pro with fast Mini-SAS connection
Sony DSR-40 DVCam deck
Horita external waveform monitor & vectorscope
Berringer audio mixer
Genelic production speakers

17" MacBook Pro for on-site editing
-ESata Express34 card & drives
-access to most of the above equipment

P D Post Productions, Inc.
TV~DVD~WEB-Device
for Corporate Communications, Commercials, Infomercials, Television Programs since 1983
E-mail PD@PDPost.com
Website http://www.PDPost.com
Business/Cell Phone (847) 275-5671

* Final Cut Studio 3 with Bella keyboard
* Avid Media Composer 5.5 with Bella keyboard
* Adobe Production Premium CS 5.5 with Bella keyboard

Six-core 3.33ghz Mac Pro with 16GB RAM
~ 30" & 24" Apple Cinema Displays
~ AJA LHe with HDMI to 21" Sony Production Monitor and component I/O to Sony UVW-1800 Beta-SP deck
- ATTO Mini-SAS card
- ESata card
8TB G-Tech Es Pro with fast Mini-SAS connection
Sony DSR-40 DVCam deck
Horita external waveform monitor & vectorscope
Berringer audio mixer
Genelic production speakers

17" MacBook Pro for on-site editing
-ESata Express34 card & drives
-access to most of the above equipment

P D Post Productions, Inc.
TV~DVD~WEB-Device
for Corporate Communications, Commercials, Infomercials, Television Programs since 1983
E-mail PD@PDPost.com
Website http://www.PDPost.com
Business/Cell Phone (847) 275-5671
@Pat DeFilippo
by walter biscardi
What's missing from the Apple updates is the "trust factor." There are features returning, though we don't know how good they really are until folks really start to hammer away at them. According to Gary Adcock Apple sent folks out to meet with editors to find out what they need to make FCP X a tool they could use, something they should have done BEFORE April of 2011.

I'm wondering who those editors are cause I know quite a few folks in LA, Chicago, LA, Miami, New York, Atlanta, San Francisco and none of them know anything about this. I'm wondering if they are the same "professionals" Apple touted as consulting prior to the original release. Evan Schechtman is the only person I know of that Apple is actually talking to, and he is a great guy to consult. But are there any feature film / documentary folks talking to them because I still don't see a great workflow for 250+ hour raw material documentaries.

Now I have not downloaded 10.0.3 yet, but I will do so soon along with the 7 to X XML tool and see what happens when I take a massive project like Foul Water Fiery Serpent and move it forward. Well actually all three projects forward because you see that's how the project is organized. We have the Capture Project, the All Tapes Project, and then the Edit Project. That was one of the beauties of FCP that we could decide on which projects to open as the editing process progress so by the time I was on the final cuts, we only had to open the Edit Project which only accesses the media required for the timeline, not the 250+ hours in the Capture Project.

I still want to see Apple add an option for Track Based editing so when we have multiple editors working on the same project, we all know what's what, particularly in the audio tracks, by simply looking at everything visually.

But honestly I know of more shops and long time editors who will not have anything to do with Apple simply because of the trust factor. They are a consumer based company first and foremost. Folks still leery to trust a company like that with their livelihood. How long until they get bored with this version of FCP and re-invent it again? :)

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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+1
Re: @Pat DeFilippo
by Richard Herd
[walter biscardi] "We have the Capture Project, the All Tapes Project, and then the Edit Project."

Did you write an article on your organizing? If so I missed it, but am still very interested.

Thanks!
Re: @Pat DeFilippo
by walter biscardi
[Richard Herd] "Did you write an article on your organizing? If so I missed it, but am still very interested."

No, we followed Shane Ross' excellent DVD, "Getting Organized in Final Cut Pro" sold here on the Cow.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

Blog Twitter Facebook
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Michael Sacci
Great article. FWIW, I have been using a PC and Premiere Pro CS 5.5 at work doing simple edits. The main concern was exporting H264 for the web without exporting. Adobe's dynamic linking between PP and Encoder is so rock solid, it is a no brainer for my workflow. FCP cannot even compare. But I have to say I don't like Windows 7 as much as I do a Mac. For the most part it runs fine Mac OS is just so much cleaner. It would be hard for me to ever buy a PC. But iMacs and MacBookPros fit my needs and I probably won't ever look at buy a MacPro again. Thunderbolt has removed a lot of barriers for people like me.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Richard Harrington
It was After Effects that did it.

Richard M. Harrington, PMP

Author: From Still to Motion, Video Made on a Mac, Photoshop for Video, Understanding Adobe Photoshop, Final Cut Studio On the Spot and Motion Graphics with Adobe Creative Suite 5 Studio Techniques
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Buddy Couch
Walter that was an excellent overview of the situation as it stands for many editors. What I never understood about the hardcore Apple supporters was the willingness to pay WAY more for less. I have Macs in my house as well, and I am also in love with the aesthetic feel they provide. That being said, the lack of hardware options and power of said hardware is mind boggling.

I have built PCs since I was 14 years old, so about 24 years in total. The only reason I went to a mac was the aesthetic properties and smoothness of the operating system, that is it period. The hardware is dated compared to what you can build PC wise. Windows 7, in my opinion has lived up to the hype that preceded it. It is a solid platform free from the lockups/blue screens that plagued its predecessor. It is a shame that it wasn't around when I went over to a Mac platform. I mean for crying out loud I can build a windows laptop that would have benchmarks above current Mac pros or pretty dam close to it. For simplicity's sake the most expensive Z800 vs Mac pro. Nuff said.

It seems the only thing tethering many professionals to the Mac all of these years was the fact FCP is a Mac only product, combined with "coolness" factor mentioned above. In my opinion if you were using Avid Media Composer or Adobe Suite on a Mac, you were doing yourself an immense disservice. I will agree, Mac software/hardware is legendary for its feel and quality, however Walter as you know 8,000 dollars on a PC system would have purchased an incredible amount of power that is just not available from a Mac platform. I won't even get into upgrades, because Mac/upgrade does not belong in the same sentence.

My 2 cents.
Buddy Couch
Enfocus Studios
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Richard Herd
Apple ProRes is pretty cool too.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been! - Good Said
by Jon Merrifield
Thanks Walter for confirming our tool switch a few months ago was proper and justified. It just makes sense to use a company whose core business is software for image professionals, not devices for consumers. At least I don't have to adjust blanking anymore, or edits to compensate for odd/even frame phase shifts or worry about generation loss and become an expert at tying up every available keyed on the Grass. Tools change, the craft and art form doesn't. Just saying'.. Its a good thing, keeps our profession dynamic.
+2
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mark Chapin
I enjoyed your post and I too feel the fear of abandonment weighing on my software and hardware systems, but I think many editors and producers are not recognizing a new and emerging market that FCP X is helping to create. That market is the enterprise wide production market. Remember when they packed all the power of a Dicomed into PowerPoint and added graphics? Clients would request PowerPoint operators to create their presentations just they had for slide shows. Once the application was available on their PC's as part of their word processing suite, the presentation production fell to their Administrative Assistants. That is why so many presentations suck!

Video is inevitably going to take the same course. More people are creating their own videos and using them in their corporate presentations. In my organization people always say, "If you can't be at the event, gimme a Flip Cam and I'll get it." Of course they won't but pretty soon they will! If everyday people can start a project in iMovie and then submit that to a professional editor to finish in FCP X, then there is the brilliance of Apple.

Sure there may be a disconnect between FCP X and other professional NLE's, but that doesn't mean that the "professional world" will always be heading down the same path. Those paths may soon diverge with broadcast and feature production going the traditional route and corporate heading down the road I have described. Sure, from a content point-of-view that is scary, user generated content always is, but steno-pools and typesetters have gone the way of the Dodo. The same may come true for the corporate video production house unless they can manage the process and education. I think FCP X is the tool for this. It may not be as easy to plug into your current post setting, but a majority of presentation production doesn't need all that.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Joseph Owens
[Mark Chapin] "If everyday people can start a project in iMovie and then submit that to a professional editor to finish in FCP X, then there is the brilliance of Apple."

I do see trouble for the B,Ed&I sector (aka "corporate") since there doesn't really seem to be enough margin left to make sense for it to be a sustainable business to cater to out-sourcing. I've witnessed several local businesses go down.

However, it is extremely rare that an enthusiast production gets to a stage where what has traditionally been identified as "online" makes any sense. Its just as cold a calculation as retail markup. Over the last decade, I've come up with a kind of rule-of-thumb that loosely corresponds post budget with overall production allowance. After-camera processes don't seem to be accorded anything more than about 10% of the overall figure. So if you're going to make a go of this as a "professional", then calculate what your annual net income wants to be, and then multiply that by 10 and ask yourself if that's what even the most ambitious home movie makers are willing to spend. Frankly, I'm guessing that number is much closer to zero. To make even a solo effort sustainable, you need at least one $1-million feature a year, or multiple documentaries and so on that gets to that minimum.

A non-monetized sector is not a market.
A venture cap investor would consider all of this insanely hilarious! Well, tragically so.

jPo

You mean "Old Ben"? Ben Kenobi?
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ramil Pasibe
A very nice read Walter!

Transitioning to Windows is indeed inevitable, up until now not even a hint of future macpros in sight.

Adobe really gained the upperhand on this one. I am also looking forward to NAB 2012 and how speedgrade is integrated into Adobe's Suite.

On my end, I've already decided to worked on my next project inside Adobe Premiere CS 5.5, the only thing keeping me inside FCP right now is working on STEREO Footage with regards to Cineform.

Cineform Neo 3D and Premiere Pro CS5.5 isn't as smooth yet on a MAC as compared to Cineform Neo 3D with FCP 7. I am feeling the slowdown on FCP 7 though with its 32 bit structure - opening a STEREO Project in FCP 7 is taking me 2 to 3 minutes!

Again, thanks for the write up!
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[Ramil Pasibe] "On my end, I've already decided to worked on my next project inside Adobe Premiere CS 5.5, the only thing keeping me inside FCP right now is working on STEREO Footage with regards to Cineform."

Hmmm, I remember Richard Harrington showing a 3D stereo workflow back in July at our Atlanta Cutters meetings. Can't remember if that was in Premiere Pro or After Effects, but it was part of the discussion.

http://www.atlantacutters.com/meeting/meeting-archives/july-27th-meeting/

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ramil Pasibe
Thanks for the link Walter, will try to watch this soon. My problem lies more with me constantly shifting from 2D to STEREO timeline, and right now Premiere Pro is heavily dependent on Cineform for its STEREO Workflow. Cineform on its end hasn't perfected yet it's Stereo Workflow with Premiere as compared to FCP. Plus with FCP right now, I can combine another set of STEREO Tools and Plugins - in particular the Dashwood Plugins. This Plugin is not available for Premiere though. That is why on a real world production scenario, ( as I am right now) I am still heavily dependent on my FCP+Cineform+Dashwood Workflow.

I know Cineform will eventually polish its workflow with Premiere but that will take time. Can't wait for NAB though. I hope CS6 can meet my needs, I am looking forward to see Adobe's integration of Speedgrade into the suite. DaVinci Resolve is coming to Windows as well. Exciting times indeed!
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by John Christie
Well said Walter! You and I both started out on the FCP journey around the same time with the Cinewave card. That to me was the game-changer for FCP, broadcast quality in and out for a fraction of the price of an equivalent Avid.

Fast forward 10 or more years and it's time to move on. I'll miss FCP, it's too bad Apple couldn't or wouldn't sell the code to a company that could continue development on it.

I remember when Apple got out of the 1U server business, Steve said they were only selling 12000 a quarter (or it might have been a year) Either way, for some smaller companies, 12000 units of a product is a viable business model, but when you're selling a gabillion iDevices per quarter, 12,000 units of another product becomes a distraction rather than a profit centre.

I hate the thought of transitioning to PCs, but its inevitable that they will sneak into our work flow as our 20+ MacPros start to age.

Cheers

John C
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[John Christie] "it's too bad Apple couldn't or wouldn't sell the code to a company that could continue development on it."

They can't. A lot of the "intellectual properties" and features still being used "under the hood" that would require Apple to license back the technology if they sold it. So from what I understand the suite of products will never be sold unless Apple completely abandons the applications. But then iMovie also has some of that technology wrapped in there too, so it's a moot point.

Better to just move on for now and keep an eye on where FCP X goes. If it becomes viable or folks actually start requesting it in the future, we can add it back to the toolbox.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Liam Hall
Great article Walter.

It has been a long year. I feel like digital editing has gone back in time. Certainly, PP has that clunky early version software feel about it and far too many missing features. Still, it's been good relearning AE. I'm hoping CS6 will be the bomb, otherwise it's back to Avid for me.

Liam Hall
Director/DoP/Editor
http://www.liamhall.net
I'll always appreciate Apple for holding Avid's feet to the fire
by John Chay
Avid is a better company today because of it.

I will miss the beautiful layout of FCP7.

I hope Avid continues to improve and the strides Premiere is taking is very promising. Can't wait for PP6!




http://www.john-chay.com

Editor/Videographer
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Sara Nichols
Walter, thank you for such a great article. As a director.producer.editor I have had the good fortune to be involved with a variety of productions from music videos and commercials to variety, reality and currently a feature documentary.

I learned to to edit early on because I recognized how large the role of post is in the creative process. For years I was an Avid snob, though I've always owned Mac, mainly because the workflow called for multiple systems and NYC's large post facilities were Avid dominated. A few years ago I sold my Symphony, and began to explore FCP, but always had Avid onboard, using them for different types of projects. And, as I got more into FCP and saw the increase in support for multiple systems on a shared network, I could see how FCP was headed toward domination.

I love Apple products, and yes, they probably don't "need" to be in the pro business--for now. However, when you look at why Apple HAS had such a good run, I believe it is in part due to the professional world in effect helping them brand. They have almost always been the tool of choice for creatives from all visual arenas except in situations where Apple didn't support beefier hardware or occasionally dropped the ball and went too consumer with their pro macs. So while short term it seems unnecessary to support the few in the pro world, I do believe this will come to impact their bottom line in years to come. It's their niche...delivering high end capability to the desktop. As a creative, I want everything on my laptop and to plug in to professional workspace when I need to, and work independently other times. It is shortsighted to abandon the professional line. I believe it could have a very negative trickle down effect. Working and living are intertwined, often more than we want them to be, but we are in a media, content-driven world. If you're not a player in both arenas, you risk diminishing your share across the board. Time will tell. Thanks again for such a great article, Walter.

+1
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
Thanks for the kind words!

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mark Suszko
Quoted froma buisness web site:

Apple ended the fourth quarter with record revenues of $46.3 billion and nearly $100 billion cash in hand. The results place Apple among the high earners of all industries, such as Exxon Mobil Corp and Gazprom OAO.

During the quarter, the company sold 37.04 million iPhones and 15.43 million iPad tablets, marking a raving holiday season. In fact, the sales have doubled compared to one year earlier. Sales were particularly strong in the United States as a lot of users have waited for the iPhone 4S.


This is why I now refer to Apple as a Phone Company. They really don't need us, except to give their products a marketing cachet of "professionalism".
+3
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Richard Herd
Apple are geniuses. We paid them to test their beta software. So far it's an awesome environment to cut pic.
-1
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mike Zimbard
Terrific article as always Walter! We're in the exact same dilemma - having invested huge in OSX, FCP, Mac Pros, and XSAN over the past 10 years. A year ago we moved our 3D department off of windows and now we're in the situation of evaluating if we need to move the whole studio off of Mac if the Pro line fades away. Definitely crazy times.

I love OSX as an operating system for the same reasons you mention in there article. Would you see Apple under any circumstances make their OS available to the masses and hardware independent? With the Mac Pro line inevitably dying my dream would be all of our artists and editors on HP workstations with AJA cards running OSX. Wouldn't that be nice??

+1
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Jeremy Garchow
[Mike Zimbard] "I love OSX as an operating system for the same reasons you mention in there article. Would you see Apple under any circumstances make their OS available to the masses and hardware independent? "

As much as this would solve a bunch of problems and would be great for us pros, I just don't see this happening.

Apple is still a hardware company. Their entire system depends on the hardware that they sell.

Put it this way, they probably won't put iOS on a Motorola or HTC machine, they probably won't do the same with their PC OS (lion, snow, etc).
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mike Zimbard
Yea - that's my feeling as well. But if they really were set on taking down Microsoft this would definitely deal a big blow. Unfortunately, I don't see it happening either.

Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[Mike Zimbard] "I love OSX as an operating system for the same reasons you mention in there article. Would you see Apple under any circumstances make their OS available to the masses and hardware independent? With the Mac Pro line inevitably dying my dream would be all of our artists and editors on HP workstations with AJA cards running OSX. Wouldn't that be nice??"

Nope, not going to happen unless a future CEO decides to make it happen. Remember when Steve killed off the Mac Clones in the past, that strengthened the Apple product line. It took some time, but Apple is all about end to end control. Their machines, their OS, their sandbox.

So you never say never, but unless someone comes along that "thinks different" than Steve Jobs, the answer is no.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Tj Jaglinski
I saddens me to consider that I might also have to migrate away from the Mac computer platform. It is evident that Apple has put the Mac Pro line on the back burner. Seems as though the "i" product line is enough to pay the bills. God, I hate Windows...

T.J. Jaglinski
dctv23.com
silvercamera.com
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+1
@Tj Jaglinski
by walter biscardi
The "i" is responsible for the best quarter ever for Apple so there is absolutely no need for Enterprise or Pro solutions anymore from Apple. Smart business decision actually.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Dennis Radeke
Great article as usual Walter.

For Adobe, I think you nailed it just fine. We've got a great product, a very high potential ceiling and we're listening to our customers. We admit that aspects of our products need improvement (they're never done) and we have no problem with working with other products as well - Avid and Apple included. Moving forward, a core for us is to embrace open workflows wherever it makes sense.

We very much look forward to showing the world things we've been working on in the future!

Dennis - Adobe guy
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Kris Merkel
Thanks for chiming in here Dennis. As proof point of Walter's comment of Atlanta not being and FCPX town is because of folks like you at Adobe and other software manufacturers that have spent considerable time over the last 7 months or so visiting us at our user group meetings giving us the reassurance and support we need while moving from an old standard to a new one.

Apple has only been here once! and it shows. We are all looking, with excitement, to this next year and seeing your team in May.

Please keep up the good work and thanks again.

"Think of everything in terms of building capacity."

Kris Merkel
twitter @kris_merkel
Product Specialist, Flanders Scientific Inc.
http://www.shopfsi.com
Co-Founder, Atlanta Cutters Post Production User Group
http://www.atlantacutters.com

2.2Ghz MBP core i7
16Gb RAM
CS 5.5
FCP7 and Studio
Blackmagic Design UltraStudio 3D
AJA IO XT
FSI LM-2340W
2TB Max Digital Pro Edit2 VR
1TB LaCie Thunderbolt
1TB CalDigit FW VR
2TB LaCie Big disk




Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
Looking forward to NAB in April to see what you guys have been up to Dennis!

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Job ter Burg
I've tried it before, without any result, but I would so much like Adobe to explain why their products are up to 45% more expensive in Europe as they are in the US. It's not import duties or taxes. This has been true for years now (no matter the currency market at any point in time).
Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[Job ter Burg] "I've tried it before, without any result, but I would so much like Adobe to explain why their products are up to 45% more expensive in Europe as they are in the US. It's not import duties or taxes. This has been true for years now (no matter the currency market at any point in time)."

Quite honestly, that's a very good question, particularly in this age of software downloads where physical packaging and shipping are no longer required.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: Article: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Job ter Burg
Would love you to push for an answer.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by David Lawrence
[walter biscardi] "If you're a freelancer, I HIGHLY recommend learning both Media Composer and Premiere."

Done and done. Great article, thank you Walter!

_______________________
David Lawrence
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ron Pestes
I have been using PP CS 5.5 on a Dell M6600 laptop with Cuda and 16 gig of RAM and it works great. All that power in a laptop! Still use my MBP and FCS 3 for old projects that are in-process but all new projects are Windows and PP from now on.

ronpesteshdvideo.com
Apple Certified Master Pro FCS 2
Sony EX-3
MacBook Pro
Dell M6600
New convert to Adobe CS5.5 Production Premium
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Chris Harlan
[Ron Pestes] " have been using PP CS 5.5 on a Dell M6600 laptop with Cuda and 16 gig of RAM and it works great. All that power in a laptop! Still use my MBP and FCS 3 for old projects that are in-process but all new projects are Windows and PP from now on.
"


Ron, as to your video card--which Quadro did you choose?
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ron Pestes
I have the M3000 card. The computer has USB 3 and esata for my external drives. I have had it only a short time but it seems to work well with XDCAM EX footage. I have had three layers playing in real time. The only rendering I have had to do is when I put the Warp Stabilizer on a clip in AE. My MBP will not touch this kind of performance.

ronpesteshdvideo.com
Apple Certified Master Pro FCS 2
Sony EX-3
MacBook Pro
Dell M6600
New convert to Adobe CS5.5 Production Premium
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Chris Harlan
[Ron Pestes] "I have the M3000 card. The computer has USB 3 and esata for my external drives. I have had it only a short time but it seems to work well with XDCAM EX footage. I have had three layers playing in real time. The only rendering I have had to do is when I put the Warp Stabilizer on a clip in AE. My MBP will not touch this kind of performance"

Cool. I'm thinking seriously about getting one of these to run Media Composer. I'd put CS5.5 on it, too, but I'm not yet willing to burn my Mac license.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
This is so amusing to see that photo on the article. It's been a long strange trip over the 4 years since I posed for that in my old edit suite which was located in my house. The old Sony PVM L5 makes me chuckle, that must have been one of the last photos of that monitor in a suite. The Flanders Scientific units came in shortly thereafter.

In a rather interesting development, we tried to give away 5 licenses of an FCP X based plug-in at our last Atlanta Cutters meeting with about 150 folks in attendance. We could only give away 2 licenses as nobody else wanted them. Atlanta is going very heavily back to Adobe and Avid and all but ignoring FCP X. Most folks agree there are some really neat features in there, but as with myself, there is a great distrust of Apple as they are clearly a consumer company now with no interest in Enterprise or Professional solutions moving forward.

Ah, it used to be so easy...... :)

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mark Dobson
Thanks for that Walter.

Great essay.

I'm a big dead fan, you'll hear me in the background of the London Lyceum recordings of 1972 and that gives an indication that I'm no spring chicken. And luckily just as my dad survived the 2nd world war I survived the psychedelic minefields of the late 60's.

So having spent many years learning FCP7 and the array of outboard bits and pieces you need to make a small Apple based NLE set up work I like many others was totally taken aback by the launch of FCPX.

But also excited. I made a commitment to learn the new software and it's been a frustrating but ultimately rewarding experience which is only now really starting to pay off. I'm definitely not saying it's faster, the freezes, pauses and crashes definitely hold it back. But it is slowly revealing itself to be a far deeper bit of software than my first impressions led me to believe.

I totally see why editors like yourself are, or have, switched software providers and platforms. I can't see anybody in top end studio production being able to work collaboratively with this software.

And collaboration is at the heart of this whole debate. With FCPX the inter connectivity was been stripped out.

I'm going to see where the next upgrade is going to take us. The depth of the next release will surely give a fair representation of whether Apple is committed to adding missing core features back into to the software, of having listened to the outrage.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
Wow, wow, wow, my wife will be so jealous of your participation in a Dead album!

All signs that I've seen point to Apple really doing very little in terms of adding anything back to the software. Rather, they've added a few more "hooks" to the software so third party folks can add many of the original FCP features back into the app. Not really the answer I'm looking for right now.

In a few years, we'll see were X is and if it's something worth pursuing at that time, we might reconsider. In the meantime, I have a business to run and the smart business model today is the open architecture Avid / Adobe workflow with the two sharing the entire FCP infrastructure that is already in place. I'm definitely having fun learning the new software, though the Avid media management is still a bit of a struggle to get in this brain, but it'll get there.

Thanks so much for chiming in!

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ben Oliver
I will totally take one of those licenses...if you still have any!
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Phil Hoppes
"Apple imploding"

?????

I wish that my business should implode so badly...
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[Phil Hoppes] ""Apple imploding"

?????

I wish that my business should implode so badly..."


We were referring to their position in the Post Production market. One of my colleagues who is a long time Avid user was simply stunned when he saw FCP X and called it a "lifeline" to Avid. If Apple had released a 64 bit FCP Studio 4 or whatever you wanted to call it, that progressed from the previous 11 years of applications, Avid would have been all but dead.

But because of the completely new reboot that didn't work with anything when it was released, it caused a resurgence of Avid in the Post Production community and gained huge market share for Adobe.

So in terms of Post Production only, Apple was on the precipice of complete Post Production domination. Instead, Apple imploded for the very reasons you cite in the link. They are cash rich selling to the consumer masses. They have absolutely no need for the Enterprise or Professional market so why bother following that path.

As Steve Jobs makes clear in the recent biography, he hated the Enterprise and Professional markets because the end users dictate what they want. With Consumers, they "don't know what they want until we show it to them." Sounds like the game plan for the NAB FCP X rollout in April 2011.......

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Phil Hoppes
I understand that Walt. I just think "Apple imploding" is a poor choice of words. "FCP Imploding" is far better and more accurate.

To my point, I am truly confused by the confusion on this board as to their lack of understanding of why Apple did what they did. Really???? You have got to me kidding me! Look at the numbers of the chart I linked to. In 5 quarters... 5 quarters iPad revenue topped ALL revenue by Mac's. Apple is clearly a consumer company. Their only evil I see is I do believe they miss-led this community perhaps in what FCPX might be. But, then again, being a public company, there is not much you can say about a product before it is released without getting into significant hot water by the SEC so in the end, I still don't think they did much wrong. They see FCPX as a means to sell lots of Mac's and mark my words, iPads too. For mostly consumers and prosumers but also Pro's where they see they can use it effectively. That it does not meet the needs of the high end professional like yourself I truly understand but nor does Apple care. You did absolutely the right thing and moved on and got exactly what you needed. I did too. For my needs Avid is like cutting cheese cake with a chain saw but Primer Pro works perfect for me and where I can use it, so does FCPX.

Again, I'm simply confused by the confusion. It's very clear to me what Apple did and why they did it and had I been in their shoes to make the decision, I would have done the same thing.

BTW - Your previous articles about FCPX are fantastic. Love all your posts and your work it great.
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by walter biscardi
[Phil Hoppes] "Again, I'm simply confused by the confusion. It's very clear to me what Apple did and why they did it and had I been in their shoes to make the decision, I would have done the same thing. "

Most of the confusion and anger towards Apple across all forums is that Apple has never come out and admitted that their primary target is the general public and the "masses," not the professional post production market in the traditional sense. I'm sure some in Apple figured the entire industry would pivot along with their thinking and some are, most are not.

There are folks out there who seem to think Apple "needs the pro market" for some reason to survive. They don't and quite honestly they don't care. But when you take a product that has been the lifeblood of production for many, and helped many hundreds if not thousands of people across the globe, yours truly included, start and grow their own businesses, and then suddenly throw out that entire workflow, well you can understand the confusion. For me it was crystal clear in April of last year during the "sneak peek" that there was no immediate future for me with FCP X and I made it pretty clear in the podcast and subsequent articles why. As I said, once the blinders came off, I realized just how different both Adobe and Avid were since the last time I really played with them over 10 years ago. It's quite simple to transition over to either of them at this point.

Others choose to hold on with the hope that "Apple is going to bring back everything we need" to make it work. Apple isn't, they're not going to waste time and money to redevelop something they killed. Just like the iPad and iPhone model, 3rd party developers are making plug-ins, add on apps and such to add features back in.

Whatever works for you, make it work, I'm going down my path and while keeping an eye on the developments of X, I'm not overly concerned with what Apple is or is not doing. I'm most concerned with what my client needs are right now and what we need in house to deliver that.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Ken Zukin
Thanks for a great analysis -- it seems as tho you've truly "moved-on," as I don't sense any anger from you directed at Apple. Good for you.

In keeping with your Grateful Dead reference -- in a way, Apple currently is what happens when you give the Grateful Dead 2 Billion dollars: some brilliance and a lot of wackiness.

It's been said before: If Apple were struggling financially, you could see abandoning the Pro Edit Community -- with all their success tho -- it feels like a betrayal.
@Ken Zukin
by walter biscardi
Much obliged, so glad the article was helpful

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mitch Ives
[Ken Zukin] "It's been said before: If Apple were struggling financially, you could see abandoning the Pro Edit Community -- with all their success tho -- it feels like a betrayal."

To paraphrase your point, since they make $400,000 in profit for each employee, you'd think they could at a minimum put some more people on the FCPX team? Updates (meaningful ones) could come faster.

Mitch Ives
Insight Productions Corp.

"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." - Winston Churchill
Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Mark Raudonis
Yep. What he said!

Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Juan Salvo
Mark,

Before going back to Media Composser did you guys try out Premiere Pro. Was there any reason you didn't go in that direction? Are you switching over to ISIS and Avid 100% or using AMA & Xsan in addition to ISIS?

@Mark Raudonis
by walter biscardi
Thanks Mark! We'll be following your lead with the reality shows cutting on Avid Media Composer. Multicam Rocks! Looking forward to picking your brain in Vegas.... :)

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
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Re: What a Long, Strange Year It's Been!
by Chris Harlan
Just about where my head is.


Related Articles / Tutorials:
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
FCPX On Air. Coming Soon

FCPX On Air. Coming Soon

Former skeptic John Davidson was right there with everyone else when FCPX was released who deemed it a complete disappointment for broadcast pros. Many updates and much experimentation later, he's now a believer: he has FCPX not only running on shared storage for broadcast work, but for John, it does so even better than FCP 7 ever did. Here he introduces a 5-part series, taking you step-by-step from project set-up to delivery, ready to help other broadcast pros get moving with FCPX.

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Workflow Update: iMac, Adobe & the X Factor

Workflow Update: iMac, Adobe & the X Factor

With five edit suites currently running at Biscardi Creative Media, and four more on standby, Walter Biscardi and crew need the best possible performance our of their workflow and machines. Here, Walter describes the power (yes, power) of the iMac, the workhorse Adobe Premiere Pro, and some never say never insight on FCP X.

Editorial, Feature
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
Smoke: A Journey and a Look Ahead

Smoke: A Journey and a Look Ahead

An FCP user and enthusiast since version 1.0, David Jahns looks at Autodesk Smoke for Mac, and discusses color-grading, tracking, editing, compositing and overall performance.

Editorial
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
High Noon in the Editors' Corral

High Noon in the Editors' Corral

A group of editors gathered at a Hollywood Post Alliance Sales Resource Group luncheon to debate the merits of today's nonlinear editing systems. In the process, they argued less over tools and complained more about an ever-changing workflow. And, yes, there are a few fans of FCPX.

Feature
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
For your Bovine Mastication and Consideration: FCPX Can Work

For your Bovine Mastication and Consideration: FCPX Can Work

After coming across and commenting on a post in the forums concerning FCPX and its current popularity and possibility for serious editing use, Charlie Austin was contacted by Tim Wilson to expand his original thoughts for Bovine consumption. Care to chew the cud with us?

Editorial
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
A Cautionary Tale for the FCP Switcher

A Cautionary Tale for the FCP Switcher

Herein lies the cautionary tale of a long-time user of Final Cut Pro, penned for those who would consider switching NLEs. Are there tools that will positively replace FCP 7? Are there NLEs that are even more powerful than our now evanescent favorite?

Editorial
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
Colorgrading Round-Up

Colorgrading Round-Up

Dennis Kutchera went to Vegas with a goal - to be tantalized by the new colour-grading options - in essence, to cheat on his beloved Avid. What happens in Vegas, this time, comes back with some great stories.

Feature
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
Confessions of a Creative Maniac: Unified Theory of Media

Confessions of a Creative Maniac: Unified Theory of Media

Convenience is more important than quality -- I've taught a couple of generations of students that understanding this basic reality is a great way to predict just about any future media trend, and in the case of NAB, it looks like the equation has not lost a molecule of relevance.

Editorial, Feature
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
Confessions of an NAB Virgin

Confessions of an NAB Virgin

This is no ordinary NAB recap. This isn't a collection of thoughts about products and software. This is the confession of a small-town starry-eyed NAB virgin, and the adventures and anxieties she finds herself in.

Feature
Apple FCPX or Not: The Debate
Real World Editing: From Avid to FCP and Back Again

Real World Editing: From Avid to FCP and Back Again

The inside story of reality TV giants Bunim/Murray Productions, and their trip from Avid Media Composer to Apple Final Cut Pro...and back again.

Feature, People / Interview
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