Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
LIBRARY:TutorialsVideo TutorialsReviewsInterviewsEditorialsFeaturesBusinessAuthorsRSS Feed

Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro

COW Library : Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorials : Andrew Devis : Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
Share on Facebook
CreativeCOW presents Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro -- Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorial



©2011 CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


Sometimes you bring in footage to your project panel to add to a sequence and it just looks wrong! This is because Premiere Pro has interpreted the footage - or made assumptions about the footage - which aren't correct. So how do you tell PP to interpret the footage properly? In this tutorial Andrew Devis shows how to use the 'Interpret Footage' function in PP and then how to use the correctly interpreted footage in a sequence that matches that footage. NOTE: The Interpret Footage function works in previous versions but the the new comp function demonstrated is for CS5 and above.



Play Video Tutorial



  View 9 Comment(s)

  Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorials   •   Adobe Premiere Pro Forum
Reply   Like  
+2
Share on Facebook
Comments

Re: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Alex Rinquest
Eish (as we say in RSA) I have posted this on the forum before but with no luck on my side.
I am editing in DV lower field PAL CS5. The footage is HDV .mpeg,.m2t and mp4 (from a gopro) - I have imported the HDV footage directly into the DV timeline and the mp4 footage I deinterlace in the timeline. After export as Dv lower field this file is imported into the station system via Avid. However we seem to constantly suffer from jitter on air and it does not seem to be consistent to one camera. It's all based on the type of movement. If I export to AE and import back (lower field) I have a 50% chance that the footage will jitter. Can you advise what I am doing wrong? Many thanks

Re: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Alex Rinquest
Wonder if you could do a tutorial with mixed footage (PAL)

@Alex Rinquest
by Alex Rinquest
Just watched your tutorial again on the numbers again - and also made a discovery in that i.e. Gopro 1 folder which I assumed would be consistent in size and format varies in frame rate, frame size and System (PAL and NTSC) - all shot the same day same subject. This seems to have been done with all previous shoots as well. Dealing with 3 Gopros each with their own folder, I uncovered a nest of confusion - suspect this is my problem:(

@Alex Rinquest
by Andrew Devis
Hi Alex

Sorry I've not got back before now, I've been away training in London.

I'm not sure what's going on for you, but one thing did come to mind. Whichever footage item you want to use, import it to your project panel and then drag it to the 'new comp' icon and this will create a new comp which exactly matches the footage type you're using. You can then always add different footage items to the same timeline as PP will support this. But, if you do it firstly with the footage that causes you a problem and then add the other footage it may help.

Also, remember that you could always add the troublesome footage to its own timeline in the manner mentioned above and then 'next' that sequence in your master sequence and it may help to minimise your problems.

Sorry again for not getting back to you earlier and I hope you manage to get to the bottom of all the problems you're having.

All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Tom Durham
It just exports at 59.94 with the same properties. Going through it frame-by-frame you see the duplicates like with the original.

The tricky thing is removing those pesky duplicate frames.

After Effects can do it on a clip-by-clip basis, but that would be unrealistic with this much footage.

Since I was able to get FCP to drop the duplicates when you edit the footage onto a 23.98 timeline, I was hoping I could do the same with Premiere. In "interpret" window or something with some of the pulldown feature of AE.

But no worries. I guess I'll have to stay in FCP for this project. Though soon I'll start doing test projects in Premiere in preparation for the switch. Thanks again!

-Tom





================================================
YOU can help save TimeSpace. Join the Chronos Protectorate!

http://www.95ers.com
http://www.SpaceAceMedia.com
Re: Tutorial: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Tom Durham
Great tutorial Andrew.

I'm very seriously pondering moving my workflow entirely over to Premiere and leaving FCP behind... I'm loving all things CS5 and Adobe just keep innovating.

My big project I want to move over is going to need a lot of "interpreting." I've got lots of DVCPRO HD footage, which is technically 59.94. (This is when Panasonic recorded everything 59.94 and somehow flagged the 23.98 frames.) I can't seem to get Premiere to do the pulldown properly so it doesn't play stuttery. In FCP, if it doesn't guess right, you just re-edit the footage onto your timeline, but move the in-point up one frame. This doesn't seem to work in Premiere. Any thoughts?

THANKS!

-Tom





================================================
YOU can help save TimeSpace. Join the Chronos Protectorate!

http://www.95ers.com
http://www.SpaceAceMedia.com
Re: Tutorial: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Andrew Devis
Hi Tom

I'm pleased you found the tutorial helpful and I've been thinking about your question a little.

Firstly, my advice would probably be to finish off the project you have started with FCP and move to CS5 from the start of your next project as it can be a complex thing to shift a whole project across. That is not to say it can't be done, only that you may find it easier to finish on one platform and start afresh on a new one.

When it come to the frame rate issue, I have a couple of tutorials uploaded that may be of some help. Firstly,

Creating a Custom Sequence 1: Using the Numbers

This shows how to set up sequences and select 59.94 or 23.976 as the default frame rate for the sequence.

And secondly (CS5 only) which is a one hit fast solution.

Creating a Custom Sequence 2: The Magic Bullet

This shows how to use the new to CS5 function that allows you to drag footage on to an icon and have PP make a new sequence for you based on that footage. (Like the new comp icon in AE).

Both these tutorials deal with setting up non-standard sequences and should make sure that the footage plays just fine in PP.

Sorry if I haven't quite understood the issue properly and I hope this is some help for you. All the best with your project.

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Tutorial: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Tom Durham
Thanks Andrew!

DVCPRO HD when recording at it's native 59.94 lays down to tape like this:

AABBCDDEEFGGHHIJJKKL... (Meaning frame 1 is on the tape twice, etc.)


When you capture properly, it records digitizes like this, dropping the duplicate frames:

ABCDEFGHIJKL... (And plays smoothly.)


However, my DVCPRO HD was not captured correctly. :( I have the whole thing from the tape, including the duplicate frames. So when you edit it onto a 23.98 timeline, PP gets confused as to which frames it's supposed to play. It plays both the A's, then a C, then both the D's, etc. It skips frames because it's trying to force the 59.94 into 23.98. So you get stuttery playback.

On a 59.94 timeline, it plays every single frame, but you don't notice because since it's playing at that rate, you don't realize it's actually playing duplicate frames.

So in FCP, if it stutters, you just trim a frame and then it starts skipping the correct duplicate frames. But I can't Adobe to do the same. Basically, it doesn't know which frames to drop! :(

I agree there are lots of reasons to finish the project in FCP... except that my project file is going corrupt and I want 64-bit power and I want to edit-on my AE projects and and and! :)

-Tom





================================================
YOU can help save TimeSpace. Join the Chronos Protectorate!

http://www.95ers.com
http://www.SpaceAceMedia.com
Re: Tutorial: Interpreting Footage in Premiere Pro
by Andrew Devis
What happens if you use and edit in a 59.94 sequence and then export out the result? Is the export stuttering?
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


Related Articles / Tutorials:
Adobe Premiere Pro
Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

As America's Test Kitchen enters its 15th season on PBS, they've made the switch to Premiere Pro Creative Cloud. Post-production Supervisor and director Herb Sevush has been with the show from the beginning, and confessed some trepidation moving away from FCP 7, but has found it to be a great fit for their data-intensive, increasingly 4K multicam production, and his work with remote editors. Here, Herb offers some insights into both the why and the how of their switch, with special attention to Premiere Pro CC's approach to multicam.

Editorial, Feature
Adobe Premiere Pro
Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin

Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin

Customizable interface, visual effects integration, and fast rendering time impressed long-time Avid editor and second generation filmmaker, Nicolas de Toth. Nicolas recently enjoyed the opportunity to edit a commercial for MagnaFlow and chose to work with Adobe Premiere Pro for the first time in his career.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Adobe Premiere Pro
RE:Match Non-matching Cameras in Premiere Pro

RE:Match Non-matching Cameras in Premiere Pro
  Play Video
In this tutorial Andrew Devis demonstrates a relatively new plug-in by RE:Vision Effects called RE:Match and how it can very quickly and accurately deal with the very common problem of non-matching cameras in Premiere Pro. A typical approach to dealing with say a white balance issue would be to apply the fast color corrector and use the white balance picker, but this can be very hit and miss, while RE:Match deals with the whole image using another image or clip as the reference to match too. This very powerful effect can save a great deal of time for an everyday problem and so earn its cost back very quickly as well as giving excellent and fast results. There is another tutorial showing how this effect works in After Effects as there is a slightly different way the two applications deal with reference images.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CC: 108 Multi-Cam Synched by Audio

Premiere Pro CC: 108 Multi-Cam Synched by Audio
  Play Video
In this tutorial, Andrew Devis looks at the next version of Premiere Pro and shows how it can now automatically synchronise footage in a bin by various options including timecode and AUDIO! Andrew uses multiple clips and allows Premiere Pro to synchronise these clips using audio and shows us in real time how long this process takes based on a 48 min talk and 11 clips! Andrew also goes on to show some of the changes that have taken place in the headers for video and audio tracks as well as a change in how to make multi-cam edits in the up-coming next version of Premiere Pro - valuable information for anyone working with multiple cameras.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 90 Export 5: Media Encoder 2

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 90 Export 5: Media Encoder 2
  Play Video
In this second tutorial on Media Encoder, Andrew Devis shows how to create preset groups for customers to ensure that you always export the same file types and minimize the risk of choosing the wrong presets when outputting multiple different sequences. Andrew also shows how to customize a preset to meet specific needs such as different frame rates or frame sizes etc and save that preset and add it to a preset group for the customer you created it for. Andrew then shows how to quickly select a smaller portion of the sequence so that you can test your output settings on a much smaller section of the sequence you want to export.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 86 Export 1: Dynamic Link

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 86 Export 1: Dynamic Link
  Play Video
In this tutorial, Andrew Devis shows how to get a sequence from Premiere Pro into either Encore or After Effects using the 'dynamic link' function. Dynamically linking a sequence to either Encore or After Effects will mean that any changes made to the sequence in Premiere Pro will be automatically updated in the program it is linked to (Encore or After Effects). Andrew demonstrates both a simple 'drag and drop' as well as a menu driven approach to setting up dynamic link.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 87 Export 2: Export Settings

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 87 Export 2: Export Settings
  Play Video
In this tutorial, Andrew Devis starts by talking about the 'Send to SpeedGrade' option and then moves on to discuss the selection settings (left hand side) in the Export Settings dialogue box.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 88 Export 3: Export Settings 2

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 88 Export 3: Export Settings 2
  Play Video
In this tutorial, Andrew Devis goes through and explains many of the options on the right hand side of the Export Settings dialogue box.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 89 Export 4: Media Encoder 1

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 89 Export 4: Media Encoder 1
  Play Video
In this tutorial, Andrew Devis shows how to use the Media Encoder to render out several different versions of a Premiere Pro sequence using easy to find and select presets. Andrew shows how to add sequences without even having to have Premiere Pro open and then change the preset to another one of your choice and add extra outputs to suit your customers' needs.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Adobe Premiere Pro
Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 91 Export 6: Media Encoder 3

Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 91 Export 6: Media Encoder 3
  Play Video
In this third tutorial on Media Encoder, Andrew Devis shows how to create and use 'Watch Folders' which are folders linked inside of Media Encoder which 'watch' for any footage item that is dropped into them and then encodes that footage item to any other output type of your choice. Andrew shows how to create and set up your watch folders as well as explaining some of the limitations of watch folders as they presently work.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
MORE


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]