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Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono

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CreativeCOW presents Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono -- Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorial



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In this tutorial, Andrew Devis deals with one of the most common problems when dealing with audio in Premiere Pro - how do you change a stereo clip into a dual mono clip? Andrew will show how to change your preferences so that any imported clip will be seen as being dual mono in Premiere Pro as well as how to change a clip that is already imported into your project. Please note that it is not easy to change a clip AFTER it has been put in the timeline. However, Andrew goes on to show one option for muting one channel of a stereo pair in your timeline which can in some cases be helpful.



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Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono
by Vann Weller
I have found a much easier workaround to this, and i use it all the time. Just copy the clip(s) you want to split out so you have two copies of it stacked. then select the top copy of the clip(s)-- and it is easy to select multiple clips -- Then go to audio effects and add the FILL LEFT effect to all the highlighted tracks (by dropping it on one of them). Do the same thing with the second copies and use FILL RIGHT. voila! two (effectively) mono audio tracks for the clip. If you do it in Modify -> Audio Channels and turn off one side, wouldn't you also have to change the channel format to mono from stereo? Otherwise, it seems like the channel you left on would end up on one side of the stereo mix.
@Vann Weller
by Andrew Devis
Hi Vann

Thanks for sharing this, it is a good solution, but it will only ever be a fix. It is always best to get the files sorted out on import or before you put them in the timeline ...

As for channel formats, no, you don't need to modify the channel format for CS6 and above because the new 'standard track' will cope with either stereo or mono in the same track - which is a nice little feature.

All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono
by Matt Campbell
Andrew, thx for the response. You're right about patience for the match frame option, man that would a harsh one! And yeah, I wasn't sure about the EDL route. Just a thought. But in Premiere do you not have the option to export multiple EDLs for each track? I know you can in Avid MC. Just haven't had the need yet for EDLs. Oh well. Maybe I'll mess around with this sometime.

Btw, love these tutorials. After being a FCP editor for the past 8 years and more recently Avid MC6 for year and a half, these videos have help a ton in my transition to Adobe products. I've seen some Audition one's but do you have any for Speed Grade?

Thanks again.

OSX 10.7.5 with a 3.39 Ghz Intel Core i7 on a built up Hackintosh
16 GB of RAM with OSX on SSD, (2) internal HDDs RAID'd 1 for project files and External RAID 5 for all project assets (media, GFX, stills, etc.)
@Matt Campbell
by Andrew Devis
Funny you should ask about SpeedGrade, I am aiming to start recording a series of about 45 tutorials on SpeedGrade CC starting in a couple of weeks. It will probably take about a month before they start appearing on the COW but it should give you a very good working basis for the product - AND - you will be using EDLs as a method of interchange with SpeedGrade ...

Really pleased that the PP tutorials have helped in the transfer from FCP/MC to PP - sounds like you can put your hand to just about anything!

Keep an eye out for the SG tuts - as I said, I should start in a couple of weeks with the first ones up a couple of week after that.
All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
@Andrew Devi
by Matt Campbell
Thats fantastic. I've used Color for a few projects in the past and really liked it. But being end of life'd, its time to move. Was going to look to Davinci, but already having SG with CS6, I figured why not try it.

been doing this stuff a while now and you never stop learning, so this is awesome news! thx.

OSX 10.7.5 with a 3.39 Ghz Intel Core i7 on a built up Hackintosh
16 GB of RAM with OSX on SSD, (2) internal HDDs RAID'd 1 for project files and External RAID 5 for all project assets (media, GFX, stills, etc.)
@Matt Campbell
by Andrew Devis
SpeedGrade CC has had some quite big revisions over CS6 and while you will be able to do most of what I show in CC you do need to bear in mind that there will be these big differences - especially in the UI.

If you don't plan to move to CC any time soon I would have a look at Davinci Resolve as it is free up to HD and very powerful. To my mind it is quite a lot more fussy to get going with but there is a great deal of power in it and it is worth learning. You may also find the switch from Color to Resolve quite straight forward. For example, Color and Resolve both use curves while SpeedGrade doesn't ...

SpeedGrade is an easy product to get going with and I think it lives up to its name in that it is all about speed - and you can get a lot of work done very fast. But the truth is, you'll probably end up needing to know both at some point anyway but if you want to learn SpeedGrade remember CC is a better and easier to use UI especially if you are only on 1 monitor.

All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
+1
Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono
by Matt Campbell
Andrew, just a thought on this. If the clips are already in the timeline, couldn't you make the adjustment in the browser as shown in your tutorial, hit yes to the warning, so that the clips are now dual mono. Then, in the timeline, select each clip by parking the playhead on the 1st frame, use match frame and re-edit that clip back into the timeline? Sound tedious especially if a large edit, but I wouldn't would work, in theory at least!

Or maybe make an EDL of that timeline, make the audio channel change, then load that EDL into a new sequence!?

FYI, I don't have any problems, just saw the comments and thought I'd reply.

OSX 10.7.5 with a 3.39 Ghz Intel Core i7 on a built up Hackintosh
16 GB of RAM with OSX on SSD, (2) internal HDDs RAID'd 1 for project files and External RAID 5 for all project assets (media, GFX, stills, etc.)
@Matt Campbell
by Andrew Devis
Hi Matt

I think you are probably right and that may well be a solution but not one I would have the patience to do myself!

I'm not sure about the EDL but that may be worth a try is desperate but of course EDLs only look at video track 1 so you would need to get everything on a single track before creating the EDL - but again it may work ...

The best solution of course is to get it right at the start ...

Thanks for the input
Andrew :o)

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono
by Andrew Devis
Hi Matt

Yes, you can do that although to use both channels you need to copy the original audio and then turn off the other channel in the copy and then copy and paste that to another audio channel. So it can be done but isn't practical for a real workflow.

The best thing is to get the audio separated out before you use it in the timeline so that you have access to both audio channels at all times. Any other approach is really 'shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted' so to speak.

Enjoy PP CS6 - it is a very good NLE :o)
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 80 Audio 10 Stereo to Dual Mono
by Matt Crum
I've only been using PP CS6 for a few days (switched from FCP7), but I seem to have come up with a quick and simple way to overcome the problem of working with dual mono audio that's already been edited in a sequence as a stereo track.

First, select all the audio clips you want to change, disable the channel you don't need as shown in the tutorial above (right-click audio clip, select Audio Channels, switch channel to "None"). Next, create a new mono audio track. Copy and paste your stereo audio clips to the new mono audio track. Done. Audio comes out both channels.


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