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Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing

COW Library : Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorials : Andrew Devis : Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
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CreativeCOW presents Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing -- Adobe Premiere Pro Tutorial



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Without nesting, timelines can quickly become unmanageable and impossible to navigate. When timelines are broken up into chunks that reflect the main elements of your story, you can keep control of your production while making quick, realistic editing decisions based on the elements you have in each of your sequences. By using nesting you can quickly and easily build the final product and still have fast and efficient access to all editing decisions. Nesting is an essential part of editing and incredibly valuable for that final color wash to give mood and substance to your production. In this Premiere Pro tutorial, Andrew Devis demonstrates how to use nesting, and how to think about your projects so that they can be edited in the most efficient way.



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Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Camille Katz
This is a great tip! thanks!
i spent a lot of time yesterday applying effects to all my clips when i could have done it so much faster.
how could i have missed this tutorial before?
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Douglas Fraze
Andrew,

Confusion here. Trying to follow your guidance in Pr and En concerning sequences and menus but having difficulty. I have 7 or 8 sequences -- parts of the former Yugoslavia. Created the master and output as you suggested. I believe you said I need to separate all these sequences when I work in Encore. Does this guidance apply to sequences such as a title with several layers? Can I leave this little sequence nested within its sequence? Encore and menus -- you made bullets for four parts of your story; however, there was no button for the complete story told from start to finish. I would think I would have one button for Output and then submenu with other buttons for the sequences found within the output sequence. If I am wrong would you direct me to one of your tutorials so I can better understand what I am to do. Thanks, Doug

@Douglas Fraze
by Andrew Devis
Hi Doug

You leave sequences nested in PP as you want to see them in Encore. So if you have a nested title etc, just link the final sequence that have everything as you want to show to Encore. This way, when they press the play button they will see it as you intend.

You only separate sequences when you want to view them separatly.

In Encore you can create as many buttons and sub-menus as you want. You just make the end action of your video to go to another (sub)menu. From there you can link buttons however you wish. They key is making sure you have whatever menus you need created and then making sure your end actions send your viewer to the right place each time.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
@Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Robert Model
Andrew,

Excellent tutorial once again. I have a question, Sometimes when I edit specifically with deleting, 1 of my sub sequences to my master I get grey bars in my master that show up . It then plays as black footage when I play back my master sequence????

Any suggestions?

Thanks
Bob
@Robert Model
by Andrew Devis
Hi Bob

It sounds like what is happening is that you are deleting part of your 'sub' or 'nested' sequence which is then leaving a gap in the master sequence.

Unfortunatly, the master sequence doesn't know that you have deleted material and assumes that you still want the original nested sequence the same length it was when you put it in the master sequence and because part has been deleted it assumes that you just want black in that extra space that has now been created in the master sequence.

What you need to do to get rid of the black is go in to the master sequence and trim back the nested sequence until those lines have gone, or, delete the nested sequence and re-nest it again after you have made the changes.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Andrew Devis
Hi Doug

I think I see what you are saying. However, I don't think this will work.

What you need to do is create your separate sequences in PP and make sure you are happy with each one and then select File>Adobe Dynamic Link> Send to Encore for each individule sequence.

Then, in Encore you wire up the project so that each sequence will either follow the previous one straight on or go to a menu with a selection of option buttons.

Nesting in PP is really about creating lots of short sequences that can be put in a master sequence for colour correction or for the final output of the project. Once they are all nested and you send that to Encore it is seen by Encore as a single footage item and you cannot un-nest the sequences.

To have access to the sequences you need to create each one and send it to Encore and wire Encore up so you can select the next sequence in turn.

I guess you could say that nesting is all about cutting everything up into managable lengths so you don't have long and unmangable sequences.

You nest those small sequences as you described, but only if you want them to work together as 1 item, not if you want to access them them separately.

Sorry if this isn't very clear ...

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Douglas Fraze
Andrew,


Thanks for the quick response. Here is the project: Former Yugoslavia travel: I: Bosnia; II: Slovenia, etc. Then under each former Republic an area such as A: Northwest, B Northeast and then within that cities. So I create a sequence for Sarajevo, and nest it in a sequence for center, and nest that sequence into a sequence for Bosnia, and then nest that sequence into Former Yugo (master). When I go to Encore I need to de-nest (for lack of a better word) and move each and every sequence into Encore. I then use the picwic to link them: pictures to city -- city to area -- area to new state -- new state to Former Yugo. Correct?


I have been making this one very long sequence. There are titles, background music, and voice descriptions of places and things. Sometimes pictures have effects and they do not apply throughout the sequence. Guess this is going to be quite the learning process -- especially going to and from AE with these individual improvements.


Doug

Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Douglas Fraze
Mr. Devis,

Thanks for your outstanding productions. Seeking clarification on nesting and eventually on Encore. If I were writing an essay I would have major topic points, and within them I may have sub-topics and even sub-sub-topics: I, A, 1, a etc. If I understand this nesting concept I reverse this and nest a in 1 and then nest 1 in A and then nest A in I. Is this correct? If I had four major topics, I, II, III and IV and did the same for all of them I could then nest I, II, III and IV into Master sequence. Correct? If these assumptions are correct, when in Encore I can recreate this hierarchy with Master and four scenes (I, II, III, and IV. If I so desired I could break out the As, Bs, etc and place them as sub-titles. Do I understand the concept?

Respectfully,

Doug

@Douglas Fraze
by Andrew Devis
Hi Doug

Up until your point about Encore you are correct. However, you can't break things out in Encore, you would need to export each sequence separately into Encore.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Paul Musgrove
This is *amazingly* helpful....
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Drew Smith
Thanks Andrew!

You have just saved me sooooooooooooo much time!


scribble88
@Drew Smith
by Andrew Devis
Hi Drew
Really pleased it has helped :o)
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Tutorial: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Tony Connoly
Very timely; I am currently syncing audio and video, and it seems one way to do that is nesting. I look forward to watching your tutorial, because I can't figure out whether I should create multiple versions of the nest if I am going to use different parts of the nested clip.
Re: Tutorial: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Andrew Devis
Hi Tony
Once you have synced up the video and audio in a sequence, use that sequence as if it is a footage item. You can nest sequence as many times as you like in any other sequences and then if you make a change in the first sequence it will be updated in all the other sequences in which it is nested. So, you don't need multiple copies of the sequence just the one nested as often as you like.
Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Andrew Devis
Thanks Alex

As always, well observed information to make sure you are the most efficient you can be and make best use of this powerful feature :o)

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Alex Udell
This is great info, thanks Andrew.

To add, nesting structure should be considered carefully early in the edit process as it can help greatly with things like color correction.

As an example if you have a situation where you are cutting a scene based on multiple cameras, and you need to color balance the cameras so that they are consistent:

1) Put the camera take into its own individual sequence
2) As illustrated in the tutorials, add color correction to the clip in the sequence
THEN
3) Use the Nested sequence to edit.

Why is this important?

Because to manage baseline color corrections for the entire edit after the fact, you'll need only to modify the color correction in the nested source, the effects will ripple though to everywhere that media is used in the edit.

You don't want to have to change color correction on multiple clips to match.

However, if you are working from a log, this has implications for timecodes, as source media timecode doesn't pass though the nest, so be careful and test the workflow and develop it carefully so you and your producer will be on the same page (literally). :)


Alex
Re: Understanding Nesting: A Key to Efficient Editing
by Kadshah Nagibe
another great tutorial.

-kaj

http://sweetproductionmedia.com


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