LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin

COW Library : Adobe Premiere Pro : Adobe : Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin
CreativeCOW presents Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin -- Adobe Premiere Pro Editorial

Born in Rome, raised in Switzerland, and son of director Andre de Toth, Nicolas de Toth is a second generation film maker. After studying acting for six years Nick worked in production, occupying various positions, from gaffer and grip to production manager. His editing career started as an assistant editor, working with Academy Award-winning editor Neil Travis for eight years. He's now been editing on his own for 10 years, with film credits including Stoker, This Means War, and Wolverine: X-Men Origins. The windows of time between feature films are small, so Nick only spends about 5% of his time editing commercials. He recently had the opportunity to edit a commercial for MagnaFlow, and chose to work with Adobe Premiere Pro CC. Here, he talks about his first experience with Adobe's video editing software.



MagnaFlow's 2013 Andretti Commercial


Adobe: What made you decide to try Adobe Premiere Pro?

de Toth: I was aware of Premiere Pro for a long time, but I hadn't given it a fair shot. I've worked with Avid since it was trying to dethrone Lightworks. Though Avid has been the de facto editing system in features, I think it's important to stay on the lookout for software that is evolving and reinventing itself. For the last seven years, I've been lucky enough to work on consecutive projects at 20th Century Fox and even luckier to become friends with Ted Gagliano, President of Feature Post Production. He mentioned that Premiere Pro has made significant strides. When a side project materialized for me, instead of going to Final Cut Pro, I decided to try Premiere Pro.


Adobe: As a long-time Avid and Final Cut Pro editor, how was the learning curve for you?

de Toth: I expected the learning curve to be much steeper than it turned out to be. The interface was malleable, so I could customize it to make it more Avid-like. I've worked with Avid for 15 years, so there is comfort in finding a familiar layout. Ultimately, my editing requirements are rather basic, including cutting and timeline editing. Finding something that does as well if not better than what I'm used to working with is encouraging.



MagnaFlow's 2013 Andretti Commercial



Adobe: What are some of the things that you think Adobe Premiere Pro does well?

de Toth:
I was impressed with the color timing functions in Premiere Pro. I also thought that the manageability of visual effects and the ability to interface with powerful visual effects software was better in Premiere Pro, which makes sense given the tight integration with Adobe After Effects. Overall, it was very nimble and I never found myself waiting for anything like I do on occasion with Avid. When I'm rendering certain effects, this wait time can interfere with the creative flow. Editing is somewhat like writing. If your process is interrupted you can lose your train of thought, and with it your overall creativity. Premiere Pro was more fluid than I expected.


Adobe:
Tell us about the project you worked on using Adobe Premiere Pro.

de Toth:
The project was not terribly complex, but I only had a couple of weeks to work on it. We had a lot of dailies for a 30 second spot, so there was a lot of footage to quickly review before bringing it into the project. I liked being able to use the Media Browser and the Hover Scrub feature to scrub through clips before deciding to bring them in. Avid has a rudimentary version of this, but it is not as smooth. I also received ProRes files of the dailies, which were not graded, so they had a flat, raw look. With the Lumetri Deep Color engine in Premiere Pro I was able to take a lookup provided by ARRI and nondestructively apply it to the footage. It didn't bake the color in, so when I went to color correct the spot, I was able to turn the lookup on and off. This was cool, because I wasn't backed into a corner based on how the dailies were graded.



MagnaFlow's 2013 Andretti Commercial



Adobe:
How did you prepare the final commercial for delivery?

de Toth:
I used Adobe Media Encoder and the experience was very good. Creating the final files is usually something an assistant will do, so I don't have a ton of experience. I found it to be a foolproof and seamless process. With Avid it is much slower and less straightforward. I posted the commercial for review at a lower resolution and then delivered the final files in the highest possible resolution. Outputting in multiple qualities was easy. The entire experience was good; I was pleasantly surprised and would use Premiere Pro again on future projects.





Learn more about Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Download a free trial of Adobe Creative Cloud


Comments

Re: Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin
by Tim Wilson
Mike Cohen: "These should be articles, not blog entries.

Your wish is our command, Mike. We've expanded this to article form for the COW Library, which is where most people will be seeing it. We are already working with Adobe to go even further with these.

I also agree with you about Premiere's long-standing status as a pro NLE. No doubt that it has achieved a new level of utility with Creative Cloud, but my company's first NLE in 1994 was Premiere, and it was an option at the heart of early systems including Media 100 qx, Radius Video Vision, and Matrox Digisuitegoing back 20 years or more. The fact is that is has been the best choice for many editors for years, even if a great number of them are only noticing it now. :-)

Thanks again,

Tim Wilson
Vice President, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW
Re: Seasoned film editor takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC for a spin
by Mike Cohen
Sort of an amusing article: A seasoned filmmaker tries Premiere for the very first time now that the software is in version 14. The great thing about editing software, which the article sort of mentions, is that you can switch from Avid or FCP pretty easily and just worry about the editing.

Cool commercial and nice to hear about Premiere being used by a "pro" but millions of pros use it every day for paid work.

And another thing, sponsored blog posts? These should be articles, not blog entries.

Mike Cohen
Premiere user since 1996


Related Articles / Tutorials:
Adobe Premiere Pro
Working with Audio in Adobe Premiere Pro

Working with Audio in Adobe Premiere Pro

Want to learn how to add music and sound effects to your videos using Adobe Premiere Pro? Tobias Gleissenberger of Surfaced Studio will teach you all you need to know about adding music and sound effects to your projects, creating and using submixes, working with audio keyframes, and much more.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
Top 10 Adobe Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Top 10 Adobe Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Join Tobias Gleissenberger for an energetic look at the top ten keyboard shortcuts Adobe Premiere Pro. These essential tips will greatly improve your efficiency and help you optimise your editing workflow!

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Premiere Pro for Absolute Beginners

Adobe Premiere Pro for Absolute Beginners

New to Premiere Pro? In this tutorial, Tobias will show you how to create a video using Adobe Premiere Pro.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips

PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips

With the popularity of HD-DSLRs, many shooters are recording sound separately because of the camera’s limitations with audio -- but putting audio and video together in post can be a chore. Longtime spots ace Bill O'Neil has been dealing with this over the past several years , and has found PluralEyes from Red Giant to be fast, easy, and effective. Take a look to see if PluralEyes will help you, too.

Review, Editorial, Feature
Bill O'Neil
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Premiere Pro CC's Lumetri Color Tool: Gamechanger

Adobe Premiere Pro CC's Lumetri Color Tool: Gamechanger

Longtime Creative COW Leader and passionate color grader Walter Biscardi notes that the word "gamechanger" gets thrown around too easily, but for color grading inside an NLE, Adobe Premiere Pro CC's new Lumetri Color Tool, "gamechanger" is the only word that will do.

Feature
Walter Biscardi
Adobe Premiere Pro
Misery Loves Comedy: Comedian Kevin Pollak Cuts His Docu

Misery Loves Comedy: Comedian Kevin Pollak Cuts His Docu

Comedian and actor Kevin Pollak talks about directing and editing his documentary "Misery Loves Comedy", a film that explores the darker side of comedians. After three software lessons from editor (and renowned VFX supervisor) Rob Legato and ten months at the console, Pollak has some new insight about the cross-over between stand-up comedy and editing.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Purrrfect Videos with Adobe Premiere Clip for Cat Day

Purrrfect Videos with Adobe Premiere Clip for Cat Day

The Premiere Clip app is a great way to get started in shooting, editing and sharing your own videos, and today Adobe is encouraging everyone to sink their claws into a cat video of their own for National Cat Day.

Editorial, Feature
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Gone Girl: Editing a Hollywood Feature with Adobe Premiere

Gone Girl: Editing a Hollywood Feature with Adobe Premiere

David Fincher's "Gone Girl" is the latest in a series of critically acclaimed films from the director, but it's the first studio feature edited with Adobe Premiere Pro, with a complex post production workflow that includes 6K acquisition and over 200 visual effects completed in house with the help of Dynamic Link and After Effects.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

As America's Test Kitchen enters its 15th season on PBS, they've made the switch to Premiere Pro Creative Cloud. Post-production Supervisor and director Herb Sevush has been with the show from the beginning, and confessed some trepidation moving away from FCP 7, but has found it to be a great fit for their data-intensive, increasingly 4K multicam production, and his work with remote editors. Here, Herb offers some insights into both the why and the how of their switch, with special attention to Premiere Pro CC's approach to multicam.

Editorial, Feature
Herb Sevush
Adobe Premiere Pro
RE:Match Non-matching Cameras in Premiere Pro

RE:Match Non-matching Cameras in Premiere Pro
  Play Video
In this tutorial Andrew Devis demonstrates a relatively new plug-in by RE:Vision Effects called RE:Match and how it can very quickly and accurately deal with the very common problem of non-matching cameras in Premiere Pro. A typical approach to dealing with say a white balance issue would be to apply the fast color corrector and use the white balance picker, but this can be very hit and miss, while RE:Match deals with the whole image using another image or clip as the reference to match too. This very powerful effect can save a great deal of time for an everyday problem and so earn its cost back very quickly as well as giving excellent and fast results. There is another tutorial showing how this effect works in After Effects as there is a slightly different way the two applications deal with reference images.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Andrew Devis
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]