LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

PREVISUALIZATION Part FOUR: When to Use Previs

COW Library : Cinematography : Gare Cline : PREVISUALIZATION Part FOUR: When to Use Previs
CreativeCOW presents PREVISUALIZATION Part FOUR: When to Use Previs -- Cinematography Editorial

WHEN TO USE PREVIS
Early in the last century, the movie industry developed a workflow, or a process of manufactoring and marketing narrative films. Over the course of the past century this method has evolved with the introduction of new technology, such as sound and color. Though much of the new innovations in machinary have enriched the movie veiwing experience, it has not altered the fundimental means of making movies. Nonetheless, pre-visualization is one of the few improvements that has made the filmmaking more cost efficient.


MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION PHASES
The making and distribution of movies comprises of six phases and a number of subphases, which are far too detailed to cover in this brief article. The six phases are as follows:

  1. Script
    This phase involves the conceputalization and writing of the story in the form of a screenplay.
  2. Development
    Forecasting the cost to make the movie and raising the funds neccessary to complete the project are done in this phase.
  3. Pre-production
    Here the artistic and logistical preparations for shooting the film takes place.
  4. Production
    This stage entails the actual shooting of the movie.
  5. Post Production
    Since it is most likely that the project is not shot in the order it will be displayed, it becomes neccessary to assemble the footage in a manner that tells the movie's story. Of course, this is not to say that editing plays a minor role in the making of a movie. Editing allows the director to creatively manipulate time and space.
  6. Delivery
    The final stage in the manufacture of a movie is making it available for viewing. In today's ever evolving market, a plathera of options have emerged from the traditional large screen movie theater to the small screen portable telephone.

HOW DOES PREVIS FIT INTO THE FILMMAKING PROCESS?
In this new age of filmmaking, pre-visualization can play an important role in every stage but delivery. However, the advantages of previs can best be realized in the first three phases where the concept and logistics of the project are carried out. Much of the time, unfortunately, projects are not storyboarded or boarded until late into the pre-production phase. Often, this is too late to be effective. The longer a director is allowed to plan and conceptualize his or her project, the better the results.

Below is a brief examination of how previs fits into each stage of film production:

  1. Script
    The script stage may be the best time to previs with regards to planning how the film should look and could be shot. By roughly visualizing the sets, the costumes and the coverage, the director can readily see how his or her story is unfolding, or perhaps, not unfolding. Many story structural and character development issues can be recognized at this juncture of planning and therefore creative solutions can be derived and explored. 3D storyboarding is especially effective at this stage.
  2. Development
    Development is the optimal phase for creating a pitch deck or finalizing the storyboards. The pitch deck, a term coined by Good Magazine, is a brief three minute slide show designed to help visualize a verbal pitch. Boarding the picture at this stage allows the director the precious time and freedom to work out how to creatively communicate the intent of his or her project. In other words, the director can discover how to best show the film's story.
  3. Pre-production
    Unfortuately, this not the best time to begin using previs. Nevertheless, this is when it is most often initiated. Due to budgetary constraints, many producers can only afford to hire on a previs artist at this stage. This delay in hiring is unfortunate as it hampers the potential quality of the project. The longer the director is allowed to plan and conceptualize his or her project, the better the results will be. Boards done in development are passed onto a pre-visualization house to be rendered as VFX animation. This is where the visual effects shots are conceived and tested.
  4. Production
    Previs at this stage is rarely used except for a process known as motion matching whereby the movement of computor generated images are matced with the movement of a photographed shot or scene.
  5. Post Production
    If previs is used at this phase, it is usually done to aid the editor and the visual effects department. Often shots that would contain VFX are slugged with previsualized shots in order to help the effects personnel determine the nature of the effects needed.
 

In the final chapter, we will look at who should use previs and how to shop for a previs artist. We begin by looking at what sort of previs is needed and the volume of work that needs to be done, and then proceed through how much time to allot for previsualization and finally end with determining the costs involved with previsualization.

To Be Continued...







Gare Cline, Creative COW Magazine

Gare Cline

Mr. Cline specializes in optically accurate, pre-visualization storyboards for business plans and motion picture productions. His clients include JuiceBox Skateboards, Arenas, Sony Pictures and The China Film Studio.

Recently, he has been designing a course in stereography for the PRC film community. His work in film spans nearly 20 years, including seven years as a lighting designer where he worked on over ninety videos, commercials and features, including Amityville Horror and King of the Hill. More recently, he had been a foreign correspondent for the Belgium magazine, Cine-Tele-Revue, covering industry news and gossip. He has also worked for the stage, including Assistant Director for the Armory for the Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Lighting Assistant on the U.S. premiere of Sam Shepard's Fool For Love at the Magic Theatre in San Francisco. Mr. Cline holds teaching credentials in art, English and history. He briefly taught English and cinematic studies to autistic children.

Mr. Cline received a BA in English from San Francisco State University and a MA in cinematography from the American Film Institute.


www.banksyde.com







Comments

Re: PREVISUALIZATION Part FOUR: When to Use Previs
by clyde desouza
Excellent series by Gary Cline.
How about a part 5 on stereoscopic 3D previz.
To get you started here's one article I'd done a while ago, that could benefit from more in-depth (no pun) extrapolation by Gary.

http://realvision.ae/blog/2011/12/3d-movies-and-motivated-camera-movement/

http://realvision.ae/blog/2010/09/previsualize-in-stereo-3d-with-frameforge...

I can recommend FrameForge 3D as the best bet software for this.

Best Regards,

----------------------------
Clyde DeSouza
twitter: @cly3d
Author: THINK in 3D: Food For Thought for Directors and Cinematographers.

now available on Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Think-in-3D-ebook/dp/B007DK92J0

http://www.realvision.ae/blog
-----------------------------


Related Articles / Tutorials:
Cinematography
PREVISUALIZATION Part ONE: What is Previs?

PREVISUALIZATION Part ONE: What is Previs?

Previs. You may or may not have heard of it. If you have, you may have heard conflicting or more often muddled definitions. Many assumptions have developed around this often misunderstood word. Join Gare Cline, Previsualization Storyboard Artist, in this series of articles as he defines what previs is and isn't, what it can do for you, why you should use it, and how it works.

Editorial, Feature
Gare Cline
Cinematography
PREVISUALIZATION Part TWO: Why Previs?

PREVISUALIZATION Part TWO: Why Previs?

In part two of Gare Cline's ongoing series on Previsualization, readers are transported to examples of cinematic genius such as George Lucas and Alfred Hitchcock to truly understand the compelling reasons as to why previs is crucial to conceptualizing and demonstrating your storyline.

Editorial, Feature
Gare Cline
Cinematography
PREVISUALIZATION Part THREE: How Previs Works

PREVISUALIZATION Part THREE: How Previs Works

In this chapter of Gare Cline's series on previsualization, the art form for conceptualizing a project, we focus on how the process of previsualization works. We begin by finding the look for the picture, and then proceed through blocking, coverage and finally end with determining the time and cost expenditure.

Editorial, Feature
Gare Cline
Cinematography
Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

If you tend to put your drone up in the air and then struggle with what to do next, or if you just randomly shoot around filling up your memory card, then this tutorial is for you. Here are 5 cinematic drone shots that, with a little practice, will take your aerial cinematography to the next level.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Filming In Small Spaces

Filming In Small Spaces

"Penned" is a narrative series shot on location in New York, which means working in lots of small spaces. The team not only explores how these challenges call upon their highest level of creativity in the shortest amount of time, but also lay out how these challenges give some of the most creative results. The producers, director, and DP all share their tricks and advice including connecting the corners, putting light in Z space, having the lens closer to a foreground element, and utilizing high ceilings.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

When you think about video transitions, your mind might first turn to software, but as Surfaced Studio vfx guru Tobias Gleissenberger points out, some of the cleverest, most-effective, and easiest transitions to create are ones that take place primarily in your camera. A little pre-production planning and a little timeline finesse can work magic!

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Cinematography
Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

From Where I Drone's Dirk Dallas will show you how to capture and stitch together an interactive 360 aerial panorama image using your drone. Dirk will also give you some expert tips on how he shoots and processes panoramic images using the Litchi app for iOS and Android, PTGui and Adobe Photoshop, along with some DIY options.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

The "why" of Alex Strohl's work as a nature photographer: to inspire people to get outside. In this presentation from Adorama TV, Alex talks about what led him to the American West, the mysteries of our interaction with water, and the magic that can happen when things go wrong.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

In his conversation with Claudia Raschke, the cinematographer of the acclaimed documentary "RBG" featuring Supreme Court Justice and folk hero Ruth Bader Ginsburg, DP Jimmy Matlosz speaks to her about the Canon C300, the challenges of shooting such a high-profile subject, and the influence of dance on her approach to documentary filmmaking. A truly remarkable conversation about multiple remarkable subjects.

Feature, People / Interview
Jimmy Matlosz
Cinematography
Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Rick Ray of DVArchive has traveled the world, lived in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, played ragtime piano for money in Australian bars, and both been arrested in Ethiopa and recruited those same police to be in his videos the very next day. In his NAB Show presentation for Adobe Stock, Rick gets specific about how to make real money in stock video following your passion around the world, what kind of equipment to choose and avoid, and yes, some advice about talking your way out of trouble.


Cow News
MORE
© 2018 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]