LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Qube Cinema Delivers 4K 3D From a Single Server

COW Library : Cinematography : Debra Kaufman : Qube Cinema Delivers 4K 3D From a Single Server
CreativeCOW presents Qube Cinema Delivers 4K 3D From a Single Server -- Cinematography Feature


CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


4K, 3D, giant screens: the combination seems like an almost impossible challenge, but Qube Cinema did exactly that and upped the ante by streaming 4K 3D from a single server. If you had been at the Moody Gardens Digital Cinema Symposium in Galveston, Texas, you could have seen Space Junk 3D presented on an 80-foot by 60-foot giant screen at a high bit-rate 4K stereoscopic DCP through two Barco projectors.

Qube Cinema President/CTO Rajesh Ramachandran
Qube Cinema President/CTO
Rajesh Ramachandran
"People have done 4K 3D with two servers," says Qube Cinema president/CTO Rajesh Ramachandran. "We spoke to these users and they were happy with what they did but not how they did it. They had to get two servers and use external synch generation to keep them in synch. And when it came to the actual DCP package, they had to get two, one for the left eye and one for the right, so each server could do a single 4K stream."

"There is a lot of prep and 'gotchas' they needed to be aware of to do it this way," he adds. "We looked at our hardware - the standard Qube XP-I server and the Qube Xi 4K Integrated Media Block - and realized we could simplify the process and make it as if it were a 2K cinema playback."

Stereoscopic 3D at 4K resolution may seem like a huge amount of throughput, but the DCI specification relies on JPEG-2000 compression fed out at a bit rate of 250 megabits per second for picture. "That's the peak rate we had to feed out," says Ramachandran. "From a Digital Cinema perspective, the server was built round that DCI spec of 250 megabits per second. When we want to do 4K and giant screen presentations, the question is, Is 250 megabits enough?"

Qube Cinema started with the Qube Xi 4K Integrated Media Block. "Our media block is spec'ed to do 500 megabits in a JPEG-2000 stream," he says. "500 megabits from each eye gives us 1,000 megabits, or one gigabit per second." With a combination of Qube Cinema's storage system and network as well as dual gigabit links on the Qube XP-I server, the company achieved that 1 gigabit split into 500 per eye out of one network link to two different media blocks installed in the two Barco projectors.

The results were spectacular, especially to the filmmakers. "Seeing the film in 4K 3D was a startling experience," says Space Junk 3D director Melissa Butts. "All the hard work we put into shading, lighting and textures was that much more brilliant and remarkable. What Qube is offering is very exciting for filmmakers and audiences. With all that detail, everything just looks and feels more real."

Ramachandran notes that this configuration produces the maximum performance possible from the combination of hardware and software, certainly one that remains a desirable goal for most exhibitors and filmmakers. "4K 3D is really of interest for giant screens, for people competing with IMAX," he says. "In this arena, they don't care much about DCI standards. They just want to get the highest quality, so we're talking about special venue movies such as Space Junk 3D and The Last Reef."



Qube Xi (left) with XP-I 4K Integrated Media Block & Qube Xi 4K XP-I workflow illustration.
Click on image to zoom.


But that's not all that the combination of the Qube XP-I server and the Qube Xi 4K Integrated Media Block can do. "Another interesting feature of this combination is that it can do high frame rate cinema," says Ramachandran. "That's up to 120 fps for 2D and up to 60 fps for 3D."

High frame rate cinema is on the horizon. Peter Jackson is shooting The Hobbit at 48 fps and James Cameron has signaled his intention to shoot Avatar 2 and 3 at high-frame rates. Although Ramachandran declines to mention any feature film by name, he notes that "high frame cinema is coming and it's real."

For those filmmakers who want the high frame rate look, for now they'll have to be satisfied with 2K. "The projector has inherent limitations," he says. "At 4K, it can't do more than 30 fps, which means at 2K it can do 120 fps. We push the projector to its maximum and we can't go any faster than it can do."

As the buzz over high-frame cinema grows, many have wondered if motion picture theatres will have the infrastructure to handle the results. With companies such as Qube Cinema providing some early solutions, high-frame cinema comes into focus.






Title image from Space Junk 3D




Related Articles / Tutorials:
Cinematography
The Lion King's Virtual Cinematography: Caleb Deschanel, ASC

The Lion King's Virtual Cinematography: Caleb Deschanel, ASC

Caleb Deschanel, cinematographer for Disney’s live-action The Lion King, shares how they used traditional cinematography to create the life-like virtual film. Caleb and Go Creative Show host, Ben Consoli, discuss modeling cameras and lenses for virtual filmmaking, how Caleb was able to move the sun around in virtual space to get the perfect lighting, using a real drone for the Circle of Life sequence, and more!


Ben Consoli
Cinematography
Shooting RED 8K for Danny Boyle's Yesterday

Shooting RED 8K for Danny Boyle's Yesterday

The magical romantic comedy Yesterday reunites cinematographer Christopher Ross BSC with director Danny Boyle to tell the story of a singer-songwriter who wakes up to discover that he's the only one in the world who remembers The Beatles. Christopher selected the RED HELIUM S35 8K sensor (with as many as 17 cameras rolling simultaneously in a single scene!) to capture a variety of looks as the story takes viewers from East Anglia to Los Angeles. With 10-15TB of footage coming in every day, this is also a workflow story, featuring DIT Thomas Patrick and the team at Mission Digital for dailies, and Goldcrest Post for online, VFX, conform, and grade.


Adrian Pennington
Cinematography
Spider-Man Far From Home Cinematographer Matthew Lloyd

Spider-Man Far From Home Cinematographer Matthew Lloyd

Matthew Lloyd, cinematographer for Spider-Man: Far From Home, takes us behind the scenes of the film and shares techniques for lighting and shooting massive visual effects scenes. Matthew and Go Creative Show host Ben Consoli, discuss working in Marvel’s Cinematic Universe, using pre-vis to prep for shots with VFX, creating Spider-Man’s holographic world, plus Matt’s camera and lens choice, his experience with commercial and fashion filmmaking, audience questions and so much more!


Ben Consoli
Cinematography
DJI Osmo Action Camera In-Depth: Taking on GoPro

DJI Osmo Action Camera In-Depth: Taking on GoPro

The DJI Osmo Action is DJI's first GoPro-like action camera. It shoots crisp 4K video at 60 FPS, and super slow motion at 240 FPS at 1080p, also with support for HDR and terrific RockSteady image stabilization. Especially interesting: TWO LCD screens to make it easy to see what you're shooting from every angle. VFX guru and filmmaker, Surfaced Studio's Tobias G puts the Osmo Action through its paces and tells all about what he likes and doesn't, with lots of sample footage for you to judge for yourself!


Tobias G
Cinematography
Stuart Dryburgh: DP for Men In Black International

Stuart Dryburgh: DP for Men In Black International

Stuart Dryburgh, cinematographer for Men In Black International, joins Go Creative Show host, Ben Consoli, to discuss creating the look for the film. Stuart talks about the challenges of working in an established franchise, filming in NYC in the snow, why Stuart prefers Arri Alexa cameras, his lighting and lens choices for the film, shooting action scenes, and more!


Ben Consoli
Cinematography
Capturing ProRes RAW

Capturing ProRes RAW

Apple ProRes RAW has lots of buzz, and can offer some great opportunities in both shooting and post, once you know how to capture it. Director Steve Pierce and DP Igor Kropotov explain why they love it, how to capture it on set, and what tools you can use.


Adorama TV
Cinematography
Small HD FOCUS 7 4K Monitor Hands On

Small HD FOCUS 7 4K Monitor Hands On

Here's a first look at the SmallHD FOCUS 7, a 7-inch, 4K monitor that packs significant production value in a moderate price. The monitor includes Small HD’s OS3 software, which gives users access to features such as pinch-to-zoom, waveform monitors, focus pulling, 3D LUTs, and more, in a build that's lightweight, durable, and retains mobility.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
GoPro HERO7 First Look

GoPro HERO7 First Look

The new GoPro HERO7 can do WHAT? Join Steven John Irby, co-owner and director of Street Dreams Magazine, for a look at the most advanced GoPro yet: HyperSmooth Stabilization, TimeWarp Video, live streaming, voice control, waterproof, and much more.


Adorama TV
Cinematography
Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

If you tend to put your drone up in the air and then struggle with what to do next, or if you just randomly shoot around filling up your memory card, then this tutorial is for you. Here are 5 cinematic drone shots that, with a little practice, will take your aerial cinematography to the next level.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Filming In Small Spaces

Filming In Small Spaces

"Penned" is a narrative series shot on location in New York, which means working in lots of small spaces. The team not only explores how these challenges call upon their highest level of creativity in the shortest amount of time, but also lay out how these challenges give some of the most creative results. The producers, director, and DP all share their tricks and advice including connecting the corners, putting light in Z space, having the lens closer to a foreground element, and utilizing high ceilings.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
MORE
© 2019 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]