LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

The SciTech Award Goes to... the Stab-C Classic, Super-G & Stab-C Compact Stabilizing Heads

COW Library : Cinematography : Debra Kaufman : The SciTech Award Goes to... the Stab-C Classic, Super-G & Stab-C Compact Stabilizing Heads
CreativeCOW presents The SciTech Award Goes to... the Stab-C Classic, Super-G & Stab-C Compact Stabilizing Heads -- Cinematography Feature


CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.





Top three images are the Stab-C Classic



Above three images are the STAB-C COMPACT

The STAB-C MINI-C has the ability to point straight down.
At the 84th Annual Academy Awards® for Technical Achievements, Nettmann Systems International's "versatile family of 5-axis camera and lens stabilizers" will be honored with a SciTech Award: to E.F. "Bob" Nettmann for the concept and system architecture, Michael Sayovitz for the electronic packaging and integration, Brad Fritzel for the electronic engineering, and Fred Miller for the mechanical engineering of the Stab-C Classic, Super-G and Stab-C Compact stabilizing heads.

These camera and lens stabilizers, says the Academy, "allow any standard motion picture camera to be fitted into the open architecture of the structure. The system can be quickly balanced and made ready for shooting platforms such as helicopters, boats, camera cars or cranes."

The Stab-C Classic (Stabilizing Cradle) is a 5-axis stabilizing camera system that eliminates adverse motion artifacts from pan, tilt and roll throughout a typical 25-250mm (film lens) zoom range. "By mounting it in a stabilizing cradle, the camera is rock steady while the world goes crazy around it," says Nettmann. "My system allows any camera to be mounted; you don't need special cameras or lenses. The cameraman can remotely point, roll, pan, tilt, zoom, focus - all the controls - and see a steady picture and not get motion sick."

The system is also completely silent and can be used on any type or size of camera crane, camera car, cable support or helicopter to produce stable images. The roll axis is fully controllable and maneuverable, with adjustable side arms that can handle many size payloads. The Stab-C Classic is extraordinarily robust, having been used in weather from 30o to 120o Fahrenheit, drenched with water and frozen with snow and ice.

The Stab-C Compact (Stabilizing Cradle) is a smaller form factor of the Stab-C Classic and shares its many features, including the ability to point straight down. It is controllable via NSI's Advanced Data Link, which can allow the head and control desk to be miles apart. The Advanced Data Link integrates with any microwave, laser, RF, IR or other communication relay on the market.

The Super-G is a 5-axis aerial camera stabilization system, rated at 120-knot flight speed, and capable of stabilizing any camera or payload with a stable image at the end of a 250mm film lens. Other features include a stabilized steerable roll axis and optional wireless control

The Stab-C Classic, Stab-C Compact and Super-G systems have been used on a long list of feature films, most recently and notably on Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, where stabilizing helicopter-mounted cameras filmed Tom Cruise rappelling around the outside of the Burj Khalifa Hotel, the tallest building in the world. According to Nettmann, the company does approximately 12 feature films a year.

The systems have also been used for competitions at numerous Olympics Games. "In 2004, in Turkey, we had the systems on a track alongside the swimming pool for the swimming events and along the track for track and field events," says Nettmann. "At the latest one, in Beijing, we had two stabilized cameras, one slo-mo and the other HD. We could keep up with the runners, drop back or move ahead."

Nettmann Systems International, which has 20 worldwide rental outlets, is currently building seven systems for the London Games, for cycling, track & field and swimming. Recently, the systems have even gone 3D. "Sports is starting to use 3D," he says. "Three times, we've filmed the fastest runner, Usain Bolt, with our Stab-C Compacts on the track and 3D cameras."

This is Bob Nettmann's fourth SciTech Award. He founded Nettmann Systems International in 1972, and and immediately turned his attention to building helicopter door-mounted camera stabilizers, similar to others on the market. These systems use passive stabilization because the mounts feature a high level of inherent inertia. He went on to develop the Astrovision and Vectorvision systems for shooting aircraft in the air. Astrovision and Vectorvision, which are still the only systems for doing high-speed air-to-air cinematography, garnered Nettmann his first Academy SciTech Award in 1977.

"Those systems put my little company in the limelight," says Nettmann, who started off his career in the U.K. at the Marconi Wireless Telegraph company. "Before that people were trying to shoot airline commercials from a B-25, with camera positions in the tail and nose of the plane. But the B-25 would struggle to get up to altitude and keep up with the airliners. My system was for the Learjet, which can outpace a commercial airline.

Since then, Nettmann won a second SciTech award for his remotely controlled optical relay system, the Pitching Lens, which aided cinematographers in capturing miniatures. The Pitching Lens was used on Star Trek: The Motion Picture and The Black Hole. His third award was for the Cam-Remote and the scaled-down Mini-Mote, robotic cameras used at the end of camera cranes that are the forerunners of today's greatly expanded stable of remotely controlled cameras. "The basic idea was to displace the cameraman to a safe environment away from the camera and still have full control of the camera's positioning," says Nettmann. The technology has been productized by Matthews Studio Electronics, as well as by NSI with its own gyro-stabilized heads and helicopter gimbals.

"I love doing this," says Nettmann, who notes that his son Karl is being primed to eventually take over the 40-year old company. "I never thought about return on investment. I've always just thought I'd like to design and build that idea."






This is Bob Nettmann's fourth SciTech Award

This story on Nettman Systems International and the STAB-C range of stabilizing heads is one of a series on the winners of the Scientific and Engineering Awards.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has awarded The Scientific and Engineering Award® (Academy Plaque) to E.F. "Bob" Nettmann for the concept and system architecture, Michael Sayovitz for the electronic packaging and integration, Brad Fritzel for the electronic engineering, and Fred Miller for the mechanical engineering of the Stab-C Classic, Super-G and Stab-C Compact stabilizing heads.

This is Bob Nettmann's fourth Academy Award®.



ACADEMY AWARDS® is the registered trademark and service mark of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.








Related Articles / Tutorials:
Cinematography
The SciTech Award Goes To...The Pictorvision Eclipse

The SciTech Award Goes To...The Pictorvision Eclipse

On February 11, at the 84th Annual Academy Awards® for Technical Achievements, Michael Lewis, Greg Marsden, Raigo Alas and Michael Vellekoop will receive a Scientific and Engineering Academy Award for the concept, design and implementation of the Pictorvision Eclipse, an electronically stabilized aerial camera platform.

Feature
Debra Kaufman
Cinematography
GoPro HERO7 First Look

GoPro HERO7 First Look

The new GoPro HERO7 can do WHAT? Join Steven John Irby, co-owner and director of Street Dreams Magazine, for a look at the most advanced GoPro yet: HyperSmooth Stabilization, TimeWarp Video, live streaming, voice control, waterproof, and much more.


Adorama TV
Cinematography
Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

If you tend to put your drone up in the air and then struggle with what to do next, or if you just randomly shoot around filling up your memory card, then this tutorial is for you. Here are 5 cinematic drone shots that, with a little practice, will take your aerial cinematography to the next level.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Filming In Small Spaces

Filming In Small Spaces

"Penned" is a narrative series shot on location in New York, which means working in lots of small spaces. The team not only explores how these challenges call upon their highest level of creativity in the shortest amount of time, but also lay out how these challenges give some of the most creative results. The producers, director, and DP all share their tricks and advice including connecting the corners, putting light in Z space, having the lens closer to a foreground element, and utilizing high ceilings.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

When you think about video transitions, your mind might first turn to software, but as Surfaced Studio vfx guru Tobias Gleissenberger points out, some of the cleverest, most-effective, and easiest transitions to create are ones that take place primarily in your camera. A little pre-production planning and a little timeline finesse can work magic!

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Cinematography
Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

From Where I Drone's Dirk Dallas will show you how to capture and stitch together an interactive 360 aerial panorama image using your drone. Dirk will also give you some expert tips on how he shoots and processes panoramic images using the Litchi app for iOS and Android, PTGui and Adobe Photoshop, along with some DIY options.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

The "why" of Alex Strohl's work as a nature photographer: to inspire people to get outside. In this presentation from Adorama TV, Alex talks about what led him to the American West, the mysteries of our interaction with water, and the magic that can happen when things go wrong.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

In his conversation with Claudia Raschke, the cinematographer of the acclaimed documentary "RBG" featuring Supreme Court Justice and folk hero Ruth Bader Ginsburg, DP Jimmy Matlosz speaks to her about the Canon C300, the challenges of shooting such a high-profile subject, and the influence of dance on her approach to documentary filmmaking. A truly remarkable conversation about multiple remarkable subjects.

Feature, People / Interview
Jimmy Matlosz
Cinematography
Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Rick Ray of DVArchive has traveled the world, lived in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, played ragtime piano for money in Australian bars, and both been arrested in Ethiopa and recruited those same police to be in his videos the very next day. In his NAB Show presentation for Adobe Stock, Rick gets specific about how to make real money in stock video following your passion around the world, what kind of equipment to choose and avoid, and yes, some advice about talking your way out of trouble.


Cow News
Cinematography
Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Charlotte Bruus Christensen is the Danish cinematographer behind the lens of the horrifying and beautifully shot film A Quiet Place. Charlotte joins commercial director and Go Creative Show host Ben Consoli to discuss the camera, lighting, and lensing choices for A Quiet Place, its unique sound design and how show created its horrifying yet warm look.


Ben Consoli
MORE
© 2018 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]