LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Bob Zelin Looks at The AJA GEN10

COW Library : AJA Kona - Mac : Bob Zelin : Bob Zelin Looks at The AJA GEN10
CreativeCOW presents Bob Zelin Looks at The AJA GEN10 -- AJA Kona - Mac Review

Orlando Florida USA All rights reserved.

Every professional editing system has required some sort of sync generator, since the beginning of the era of television. Long ago, it was separate sync, blanking and subcarrier.

In the 1970s, composite black was created to carry all of these signals across one video wire. This use of synchronizing different pieces of video equipment has been used in every piece of professional video equipment developed ever since. We see this referred to as Genlock, External Reference, External Sync, or Reference Video.

Sync and color black generators used to cost a lot of money. But times changed, and prices got lower and lower. A little company called Horita came along, and released a very low cost color black generator - the BSG-50, and almost everyone, overnight said "I'm not gonna spend over $1000 for a black generator, I'll buy a Horita box".

And all was good - until Hi Def Video and the 23.98 frame rate cameras came along.

All of a sudden, the good old color black generator wasn't good enough anymore. People wanted to shoot, edit, and output back to tape at this new frame rate. And companies like Evertz and Tektronix came out with sync generators that would work at these new frame rates, that matched different hi def standards developed by Sony and Panasonic.

And these new sync generators - called TRI-LEVEL SYNC GENERATORS were expensive. All over $3000. And they were complicated to use. They had big manuals, rack chassis with lots of switches, and knobs, or setup control panels. Everyone was jumping into the hi def sync generator game - big names like Tektronix, Leader, Evertz, Astro Systems, Ensemble Design, Nvsion, and others. And so, people that needed tri-level sync were destined to spend over 3 grand to get a working unit.

Until April 2007.

A new hope
AJA Video shocked the world by releasing the GEN10, a multiformat tri-level sync generator, that's also a color black generator. And a color bar generator. It also generates AES digital audio tone or silence. AND it works at NTSC or PAL frame rates. AND it will do both Color Black AND tri-level Sync at the same time. All in one tiny AJA GEN10little box.

The big reason everyone jumped up and down, was its small price: $390, about 1/10th the price of any other box on the market.

So lets make this simple. You need a sync/black generator, but sometimes you need NTSC, sometimes you need PAL for those European jobs you occasionally get. And you need color bars once in a while to test your system out. And you've started getting in those Hi Def video jobs that were shot at 23.98 frame rate, and the client wants a 23.98 frame rate master on an expensive HD VTR that you'll rent. That's a lot of little boxes to buy, and you really can't justify the cost to any client.

But the AJA GEN10 solved all of these problems, and paid for itself in the first day of your first job.

In normal operation, you only need NTSC color black, and the GEN10 gives you 6 NTSC black outputs. Flip one of the tiny DIP switches on the unit, and you get 6 PAL black outputs.

Maybe your TV monitor looks weird, and you need to quickly get color bars out of this little box - flip a DIP switch, and you get 75% NTSC or PAL color bars. (No, you can't do Bars and Black at the same time - it's one or the other).

But the GEN10 is split into 2 groups - 4 BNCs on one side, and 2 BNCs on the other side. So you can have 4 BNCs putting out color black (or color bars) while the other 2 BNCs put out tri-level sync, at any frame rate you like. Or vice versa - you can have 4 BNC's putting out tri-level sync, while the other 2 are putting out black.

The typical use would be for all color black, but then you get an HD job that requires tri-level sync, because you have to lock your edit controller and HD VTR to a 720p or 1080i 23.98 frame rate (and NTSC or PAL color black can't do this!). You would flip DIP SWITCH #2 on the AJA GEN 10 to the "HD" position, and like magic, you now have your edit controller and HD VTR being fed tri-level sync, while the rest of your equipment is still getting NTSC or PAL color black. ONE LITTLE SWITCH. Want to work at 720p or 1080i - just one more little switch (it's switch # 5).

You don't even need the manual, as it's all silk screened right on the little AJA GEN10 box.

AJA GEN10 rear

The box is so flexible, that it will generate all the little variations of tri-level sync that you may be forced to work with - everything from 1080i/59.94 to 1080psf23.98 to 1080p23.98, 1080p29.97, all the 720p variations of this, and all the film rates of true 24, 30 and 60, both at 720p and 1080i. And yes folks, this product is only $390 !

But do you really need tri-level sync at all ? Well, most of my clients never work at 23.98, and so their old trusty Sigma or Horita black generators work just fine. Their VTR's do the pulldown for them to work at standard frame rates. But what if you need nothing other than NTSC black with the occasional PAL black ? You won't find ANY OTHER COMPANY making a dual standard black generator. And if you DO ever need to work at 23.98 ? For this low price, why would you ever consider any other black generator, when this does EVERYTHING.

Bottom Line
There is another great thing about this box, which is true about most of the AJA mini converters. It just plugs in and works. No setup instructions, no 60 minutes with a manual. Plug it in, and it works. Too lazy to read a .pdf file - just look at the silk screening for the DIP switches right on the back of the unit, and you are in business.

But what if you don't use Final Cut Pro? What if you don't use an AJA capture card? WHO CARES?? This is the ONLY black generator you should own, no matter what other products you have.

If you have an Avid Adrenaline, or certainly an Avid Nitris, that wants to see tri-level sync when working in 23.98 - THIS IS YOUR BOX.

Got a Blackmagic Multibridge HD or Decklink HD Extreme - THIS IS YOUR BOX.

Got 3 Sony HD cameras and a Panasonic HD-SDI switcher, and don't want to suffer the frame delay with the frame sync inputs - THE GEN10 IS YOUR BOX to genlock all of this production gear together.

No matter what you own, no matter what you do in the video business, there is no longer any reason to not own an AJA GEN10. It's as critical a piece of equipment, no less critical than a set of speakers, or a TV monitor.

Now there are plenty of people out there that are saying "I never use a black generator - I just throw my VTR to look at the Video Input as the reference signal." There are countless posts on user forums about all the problems that are generated because of this - everything from channel error conditions, to audio distortion problems, to sync errors, to VTRs not locking up.

There are always "tricks" to avoid tri-level sync, but at $390, there is no longer any excuse. Everyone can afford to have their professional video equipment locked to a stable house sync - whether they are in Europe or the US, working at standard frame rates, or 23.98, or other variations that require tri-level sync. The AJA GEN10 is just a no brainer when building a video system.

If you found this page from a direct link, please visit our forums or read other articles at


I ran across this thread when
by Brian Roth
I ran across this thread when researching a problem I encountered with the Aja GEN10. The system in question is a new, small-ish studio that produces a live, 1 hour daily news magazine that is streamed on the net and simulcast on Cox cable in their Oklahoma markets. The majority of the plant is 1080i (with Aja FS-1 "Swiss Army Knife" boxes to input/output from/to some legacy analog equipment that was recycled from the older analog facility).

The bulk of the equipment requires tri-level sync, but there are some units that require blackburst. Hence, the GEN10 appeared to be an inexpensive answer for all "house sync" requirements.

In addition to new HD cameras on floor pedestals, we included a pair of Panasonic AW-HE100 cameras mounted from the lighting grid to supply wide shots, etc. The HE100's are self-contained "robo cams" (with remote controlled pan/tilt/zoom/focus) which come standard with analog outputs, BUT have an optional 1080i output module which we purchased for each cam.

The HE100's require blackburst sync.

When we heated up the new system earlier this week, we were stunned to see that the HE100's were vertically offset about 1/3 of a frame. IOW, the image from those cams...while horizontally synced...was almost split in half with a black bar in the "middle".

I connected my dual trace Tek scope to the outputs of the trilevel DAs and the blackburst DAs, and after some fiddling with triggering, etc. observed the vertical sync "retrace" "blanking" pulses were indeed offset between the trilevel and blackburst signals.

Thinking that we had a defective GEN10, we contacted Aja tech support. They checked with Engineering, and reported back that the trilevel and blackburst outputs ARE NOT VERTICALLY TIMED with each other!!!!

We did a quick "search and scramble" and overnighted:

DV-321 Genlockable HD/SD Sync Generator

Functionally the same as a GEN10, but with Genlock input...which I wanted from the beginning "just in case" for some odd-ball future requirement. ESE also has:

DV-319 HD/SD Sync Generator

...wiithout genlock.

Sync problem solved for a few more bucks!

I am annoyed that Aja makes NO mention of the non-timed Vertical in any of their GEN10 sales docs, nor in the tech/install manual. Live And Learn! That said, I generally like Aja products.


PS...last year I discovered that the analog outputs of the Aja FS-1 units we bought for another project had a volt or so of DC offset; that caused some problems with devices which had DC coupled inputs....."blown out" analog video. I fixed that problem by installing a low impedance 1000 microfarad capacitor in-line. Aja tech support is aware of that problem, and it may be fixed by now.

I still like Aja....
Brian Roth Technical Services
Oklahoma City, OK
brianroth is offline Reply With Quote
Not the only generator you will ever need, though.
by Job ter Burg
Not so great if you need both PAL and 24.00p or 23.98p HD sync simultaneously. It will not do that. Check the manual, and see that, when set to PAL, this machine only does 25p/50i HD sync.
Bob Zelin Looks at The AJA GEN10
by Robin Hobart
Very cool if you're the only one working. My two problems with this box. 1. You can only output 1 tri-level signal at a time. It seems pretty common these days in production environments that someone will be working in 23.98 and someone else will be working in 59.94 and others in NTSC and even 720p. 2. It can't genlock to anything. For 1 person with a deck and a CPU this unit is pretty ideal. For anything larger than that I think you'd be painting yourself in a corner to go with this.

Related Articles / Tutorials:
AJA Kona - Mac
Cal Digit S2VRHD

Cal Digit S2VRHD

CreativeCOW's Bob Zelin tests a Cal Digit S2VRHD with a host card for a PCI-X computer, and a PCI-E computer. He used the incredible AJA Kona System Test, to evaluate the drive speeds. He was determined to 'break it.' Did he? No. He determined that...''If you want to do uncompressed HD, for a fraction of the price of an Apple Xserve RAID, or other hi end SCSI or Fibre Channel drive arrays, THIS IS YOUR BOX.'' Read the rest to find out why.

Bob Zelin
AJA Kona - Mac
AJA HD10AVA Converter

AJA HD10AVA Converter

CreativeCOW's Bob Zelin discusses how to turn your HDV VTR into a professional product using the amazing AJA HD10AVA converter. It takes the analog component HD signal from your Sony or JVC HDV VTR, and converts it to an HD-SDI signal that can go right into the HD-SDI input of your capture card.

Bob Zelin
AJA Kona - Mac
AJA Kona SD v2.1

AJA Kona SD v2.1

CreativeCOW leader, Marco Solorio reviews the new AJA Kona SD v. 2.1. For those seeking the latest uncompressed capture card for your Final Cut Pro system, this may be the answer you're looking for. With version 2.1 in public release, this system has unique features that other capture cards can only dream of.

Marco Solorio
Recent Articles / Tutorials:
The Cinematography of Altered Carbon

The Cinematography of Altered Carbon

Today we explore the cinematography of Altered Carbon with Directors of Photography Martin Ahlgren and Neville Kidd.

Ben Consoli
Adobe Creative Cloud
Creating Dunkirk VR: Ingenuity, Accessibility & Adobe Tools

Creating Dunkirk VR: Ingenuity, Accessibility & Adobe Tools

Academy Award-nominated director Christopher Nolan has referred to his film Dunkirk in IMAX as “virtual reality without the goggles,” so when it came time to build Save Every Breath: The Dunkirk VR Experience, the team at Practical Magic knew that the stakes were higher than usual. Creative COW Associate Editor Kylee Peña speaks with Practical Magic's Matt Lewis and Adobe Director of Immersive Chris Bobotis about the challenge of creating a tie-in worthy of a supremely immersive Academy Award-nominated Best Picture, the future of user interfaces, the role of community in storytelling, and the new ways that young creators are driving technology.

Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
A Vision For Stock Video Success: Daniel Hurst, VIA Films

A Vision For Stock Video Success: Daniel Hurst, VIA Films

You’ve definitely seen Daniel Hurst’s work. An early mover in high frame rate and aerial shooting for stock footage using cameras including Phantom Flex 4K and RED Weapon 8K, he’s sold over 200,000 clips through his company VIA Films. His career has been driven by trying to create shots he hasn't seen before, even if it means building a new set of skills from scratch. Daniel still sees opportunities for himself and anyone else who wants to start or grow their business in the ever-more competitive field of stock video, and offers practical advice on how you too can succeed.

Daniel Hurst
How Kubrick Achieved the Cinematography of Barry Lyndon

How Kubrick Achieved the Cinematography of Barry Lyndon

Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon is often lauded as one of the greatest achievements in the history of cinematography. And in a decade or even a year with some of the toughest competition imaginable, Barry Lyndon always seems to stick out just a little bit more. What sets the cinematography of Barry Lyndon apart from other movies? And how was it done? Let's explore the story...

Tutorial, Feature
Tyler Knudsen
Adobe After Effects
Basic Clone Effect Interaction - After Effects Tutorial

Basic Clone Effect Interaction - After Effects Tutorial

Want to take your CLONE EFFECT to the next level? Want to know how to make your clones INTERACT? Tobias Gleissenberger shows you how.

Tobias Gleissenberger
Know Your Film Editing History, Part 1

Know Your Film Editing History, Part 1

Knowing about the history of film editing can help you understand how best to use these tools today, as well as point to where film editing might go in the future. Join feature film editor Sven Pape, host of "This Guy Edits", for part 1 of his fast-paced, example-packed conversation with Los Angeles-based filmmaker and film teacher Tyler Danna.

Tutorial, Feature
Sven Pape
Audio Professionals
2018 MPSE Award Winner John Fasal on His Passion for Sound

2018 MPSE Award Winner John Fasal on His Passion for Sound

On February 18th, the Motion Picture Sound Editors will present John Paul Fasal with its annual Career Achievement award at the 65th MPSE Golden Reel Awards. Fasal has worked in sound for more than 30 years as a sound designer and field recordist. His many credits span features, television and games, including such titles as Top Gun, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Interstellar, The Dark Knight, American Sniper and this year’s box office hits Dunkirk and Coco. Fasal recently spoke with the MPSE about his career and the art of sound.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Creative COW
© 2018 All Rights Reserved