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Keyboard Customization in Premiere Pro CS3

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Keyboard Customization in Premiere Pro CS3
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Steven Gotz: Keyboard Customization in Premiere Pro CS3
Steven Gotz
Steven Gotz
http://www.stevengotz.com/premiere
Clermont, Florida USA
©2007 Steven Gotz and Creativecow.net. All rights reserved.

Article Focus:
This article from CreativeCOW leader Steven Gotz explains the differences in the Keyboard Customization between Premiere Pro 2.0 and Premiere Pro CS3. It started out as a simple post, but he got carried away, so here goes...


Some changes in the Keyboard Customization between Premiere Pro 2.0 and Premiere Pro CS3 were to accommodate Macintosh users now that Premiere Pro CS3 is available on the Mac under OSX. Some changes were merely additions or deletions. My comments are meant for PC users who have grown set in their ways, and while there may have been a great reason to make the Mac and PC keystrokes the same, I believe that Adobe should have included the option to select the Premiere Pro 2.0 keystrokes as a preset, with any newly added options, of course. I have included with this article the file that I believe Adobe should have included under the name of "Mostly the Same as 2.0". Use it, or don't use it. Make your own if you wish. This is all about you, and your preferences.

Premiere Pro 2.0 had a "Toggle Source/Program View" set for Ctrl+ that is not present
(and no longer needed as far as I can tell) in CS3. This is because CS3 added a hotkey for each panel. Finally!

One change that makes a lot of sense is the replacement of F9 for "File > New > Title" with Ctrl+T because let's face it, Ctrl-T is easier to remember for "Title" and it probably interfered with a Mac process. But wait, they also added "Title > New Title > Default
Still" and assigned F7, which does the same thing as Ctrl-T doesn't it? I put F9 in place of F7 for old time's sake.

What I find strange is that they seemed to have simply overlooked putting in the shortcuts for "File > Export > Movie" (Ctrl+M), "File > Export > Frame" (Ctrl+Shift+M) and "File > Export > Audio" (Ctrl+Alt+Shift+M). Since the keystrokes are not used elsewhere within Premiere Pro CS3, it is easy enough to just add them back in. So I did.

Ctrl+H for "Clip > Rename" is missing. Put it back in. However, keep in mind that when the History panel is selected instead of a clip in the sequence, Ctrl-H used to be "Clear History". It is no longer OK to reuse keystrokes so you have to make a decision. I chose "Clear History" to be Ctrl-Alt-H since I don't bother to clear the history very often anyway.

And for those of you who were using the Adobe Title Designer in Premiere Pro 2.0 for credits, you may have learned Ctrl+Shift+T to call up the tab stops in the titler. No longer. That option is now "mouse click only" as far as I can tell. It is not listed in the Keyboard Customization menu anymore.

Not to worry, the Enter key still renders the sequence, but the information is missing from the Keyboard Customization list. Trying to put it in is useless. Fortunately it still works anyway.

Here's an interesting one. The shortcut for "Marker > Go to Clip Marker > Numbered" was Ctrl+Shift+3 in Premiere Pro 2.0 but was changed to Ctrl+Shift+1 in CS3. Really, what was the point of that? Even if the first one made no sense, why change it now that some people have learned it. Change it back.

The shortcut for "Marker > Go to Sequence Marker > Numbered" used to be Ctrl+3 and is now Ctrl+1 (see above for reason). Again, change it back.

Match Frame used to be T and is now M. Um. OK. Sure, why not? Because I learned it the other way, that's why! Well, since the Trim Monitor now has a keystroke (T), I am willing to let this one go. You have to pick your battles.

The shortcuts for the Premiere Pro 2.0 workspaces were Shift+F9 through Shift+F12 for Editing, Effects, Audio and Color Correction. Well, now it is Alt+Shift+1 through Alt+Shift+8 for workspaces one through eight. The new defaults (which I left alone) are:

Audio Alt+Shift+1
Color Correction Alt+Shift+2
Editing Alt+Shift+3
Effects Alt+Shift+4

The "Play In to Out with Preroll/Postroll" shortcut used to be Ctrl+Alt+Space and is now Shift+Space. Leave it be or change it. I left it as Shift-Space since I never learned that keystroke anyway.

The Audio Mixer Panel menu used to have "Show/Hide Tracks" as Ctrl+T and it is now Ctrl+Alt+T. OK. Now I am in trouble because I left Ctrl-T to create a new title. This is another case of only one shortcut per key combination. Leave it be.

"Meter Input(s) Only" used to be Alt+M and is now Ctrl+Shift+I. This interferes with a menu accelerator so find a new keystroke or leave it be.

Are you ready for some good news by now? OK, here goes! Here are the all new keystrokes to change focus to each different panel:

Project Shift+1
Source Monitor Shift+2
Timelines Shift+3
Program Monitor Shift+4
Effect Controls Shift+5
Audio Mixer Shift+6
Effects Shift+7

There is a cool new feature that allows you to maximize the active panel and then use the same keystroke to restore it to its normal size. Check out the ` key (shares the ~ key on the PC keyboard for most people). That is one of my favorites if not my all time
favorite.

"Open in Source Monitor" has a long awaited shortcut for mouse haters: Shift+Enter (Me? I still just double click.)

Now that you have the information, out of good conscience I must recommend that you learn the new CS3 keystrokes and be done with it. If that does not please you, then make use of "Mostly the Same as 2.0.kys" that I zipped up for you into PProCS3Keyboard.zip" and fiddle with it to your heart's content. On my PC (WinXP), it goes in the C:Documents and SettingsStevenApplication DataAdobePremiere Pro3.0 directory. Replace your name for mine and you should be able to find the right place for it. In lieu of that, it goes in the same directory as "Adobe Premiere Pro Prefs" so you should be able to find the right directory.

Good luck, and enjoy the new features in Premiere Pro CS3.

Feel free to ask questions or comment in our Premiere Pro forum at Creativecow.net. Or if you have basic questions, try out our Premiere Basics forum.




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