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On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX

COW Library : Sony XDCAM - EX & Related : Don Greening : On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
A Creative COW Real Time Report


Creative COW Real-Time Report: Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX

Trent Armstrong

Don Greening
Port Coquitlam, British Columbia Canada
©Don Greening and CreativeCow.net. All rights reserved.


Article Focus:
In this Creative COW Real Time Report, Don Greening takes us along on his very first shoot with his brand new Sony XDCAM EX camera on location in British Columbia. Upon return to his nice warm studio, Don also takes us through his very first look at the footage on his plasma TV, and his first edit in Final Cut Pro.


My wife and I walked out onto the Port Coquitlam river dykes in British Columbia, Canada to do some scenery shooting with our new Sony PMW-EX1. I've been shooting DV until now, with a Canon GL2, XL2 and Sony PD170. I bought the EX because of what it is: HD, 1/2" chips, pro-style lens, tapeless and all wrapped up in a small unobtrusive package for run and gun/event type shooting. There's nothing else like it in its class.


Sony PMW-EX1 profile
Click image for larger version


We didn't spend a lot of time on our first trip with the EX because it was cold and I was a real wimp. We ended up taking about 10 minutes of footage. I didn't try any other picture settings other than taking the camera out of the box and changing the recording setup to 1080P 30fps. I used the highest quality setting of 35 mbps.

 

PMW-EX1 shot of river dyke
Click image for full-size version

 

Even though I was shooting with the default picture settings (other than 30p and a shutter speed of 1/60) I was impressed with the color saturation, the amount of increased latitude in the blacks and highlights, and the amazing shallow DOF. I'm so used to shooting MiniDV and protecting highlights that I ended up unconsciously underexposing just about every scene. This resulted in some picture noise in the blacks, but as soon as I exposed properly the noise disappeared completely.


Sony PMW-EX1 close-up of snow
Click image for full-size version

The double zebra bar function is wonderful, at least for me. Now I can set zebra 1 at 80% for faces and zebra 2 at 100% IRE to see what would be totally blown out if the picture is recorded. Both zebra settings can be active at the same time. The pro cameras have had this feature for years and I've been waiting a long time for a camera I can afford that has this function.



PMW-EX1 river shot 2
Click image for full-size version


The lens controls for manual focus and zoom are smooth, give lots of feedback and are repeatable for things like rack focus, etc. What I liked best is the iris ring on the lens. It's so much easier to adjust exposure than anything I've ever used in the past. And it's fast and smooth.

EX1 dark details
Click image for full-size version


One of my shots today was of a small boat on the river going by at a brisk pace. I zoomed all the way in (14x) and panned with the boat for several seconds. There were lots of bare winter tree branches in the foreground of the picture whipping by but the XDCAM codec powered right through the fast action without a hiccup.

XDCAM HD EX boat 1
Click image for full-size version

 

I have a new respect for the MPEG2 35 mbps VBR compression.

 

XDCAM EX1 boat 2
Click image for full-size version



The Big Screen
When we got home I immediately hooked the camera up to our 50 inch Samsung plasma TV using component in. I pushed play on the camera and it cycled through all the scene files on the card non-stop. I thought it would have stopped at the end of each clip but the camera just played all the clips in one go. Nice.


XDCAM EX on plasma


Anyway, the video is impressive. Huge amount of detail. And a big part of why I wanted to move to progressive HD is for the LCD and plasma televisions coming to market and to "future-proof" for the corporate markets our company is going after in the new year. Progressive shooting is the way to go when your delivery is for a client watching your product on an LCD or plasma screen. No contest.

 

PMW-EX1



Workflow
There is more than one way to transfer the files over but I elected to simply do it within the FCP log and transfer window. In order for this to work the software required is Final Cut Pro v.6.0.2, Quicktime Pro v.7.3 and Mac OS v.10.4.11, in addition to the free Sony Clip Browser and Sony XDCAM Transfer Tool v.2.1. Of course, for those who are already using OS v.10.5.1 you probably already have QT 7.3.

Once the camera was connected via the included USB cable I turned it on and waited for the camera device icon to appear on the desktop. When it didn't show up I looked into the camera's VF and discovered that it was waiting for me to say "OK" to its question which was: "Do you want to connect your EX via USB?" or something similar. Once I confirmed the request the device showed up on the desktop like a hard drive or disc image icon with the label "Untitled."

PMW-EX1 in the studio

I started up a new project in FCP and chose a new sequence with the setting XDCAM EX 1080 30p 35 VBR because that's what the footage was recorded at yesterday. Once that's done you're ready for the transfer.

Now, logging in this instance isn't done in the traditional way like you would do if you were capturing tape. You don't use any of the log and capture controls. Instead go to the file menu and choose: "Import > Sony XDCAM." (Even though I had the log and transfer window open I'm not sure now that it even needs to be active in order to access the camera. Just a thought that others may want to look into when it's time for them to transfer video.)

Immediately the Sony Clip Browser window appears within FCP. From here, it's just a matter of highlighting each (or all) of those scene files and choose "Import" on the lower right side of the Clip Browser window.

XDCAM capture in FCP
Click image to enlarge


Before transferring each clip you have the option to add a clip name, metadata, etc. to give each clip a unique filename. BUT BEFORE YOU DO IT......I highly recommend that you change the default capture settings within the Sony Clip Browser window. Meaning, you want to change the place where the actual video files will be saved.


Why? Because the default location is on your startup drive, inside your Documents Folder. Even though you may have already created a scratch folder on your media drive(s) within FCP, these transferred files will not be there when you check later. They will instead be in the folder location that you have chosen within the Sony Clip Browser window.

Why Sony chose the startup drive as the default location is known only to Sony, but your media should not be saved to your startup drive, only a separate media drive or a drive array. Using the USB camera connection resulted in a transfer speed of roughly 15 or so sec. for each minute of media transferred. Choosing a lower recording bitrate will probably result in faster transfer times.

Plugging your SxS Pro memory card directly into your MacBook Pro's Express 34 slot will dramatically reduce the time it takes to transfer media, down to about 5 min. or less for a 16Gbyte SxS Pro card which is about 50 min of footage recorded at the HQ camera setting.


In the accompanying picture of FCP's Browser window you can see that some of the transferred clips are showing up twice.

FCP Browser with repeated XDCAM clips

Not too sure why this is happening but from what I've been able to find out it's not happening to everybody. There is a workaround. Folks here at Creative COW like Ben Kupfer and others have reported that if you delete your filenames from the Browser and import again from their folder on your hard drive there will be no duplication of filenames when they show up again in the Browser window. You DON'T have to actually re-transfer the video again from the camera.

Make sense?

Before you delete the actual video clips from your SxS Pro Memory card I recommend that you go to the clips on your hard drive and check each one, making sure they play okay. Just double -click each .mov file and it will play in the stand alone Quicktime Player window. Once you're comfortable with your workflow and have seen the reliability with it then you probably won't have to do this last step before reformatting the card, but for now I'd check first.

 

What's next

Today, we mostly shoot weddings, but starting next year we'll really be going after more corporate business. We'll be dramatically changing our web site to reflect that, especially pointing to the fact that we'll be shooting with the "uncompromising quality of CineAlta HD."

XDCAM CineAlta

But that's our little secret, right? ;-)

 

Read part 2 of Don's Real Time Report here, a low-light shoot-out between the EX1 and the PD170.




If you found this page from a direct link, please visit our forums or read other articles at CreativeCOW.net





Comments

Re: On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by pamela heller
This camera is certainly recommended by many people. Can someone please confirm workflow is good with a:
PC, Intel(R)Core(TM)2DuoCPU
Memory: 3.00GB
32 bit Operating System
and editable in Premiere Pro?
About to buy it but would like to know your experience with the above. Much obliged.
Decklink SDI an option
by Ron Coker
Hi Henry! Can I check if you have considered the Decklink SDI card ? It promised 10-bit 4:2:2 and its about 280 USD. Probably the cheapest option as a card..
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Brian Jacobs
Don, thanks for the additional info.

I will do as you suggest.

Brian
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
Hi Brian,

There are several inherent differences between CCD and CMOS technology. With CCD the sensor is scanned all at once, whereas a CMOS sensor is scanned from top to bottom. This results in the CMOS "picture skew" when there's fast action being recorded and the frame rates/shutter speed is too low to neutralize the effect. This scanning system also results in the "rolling shutter" effect where a camera flash will only be seen in part of the frame. Choosing the shooting mode to match the subject matter becomes very important with CMOS cameras. By the way, the RED ONE camera also has these same issues.

CMOS creates a little noisier picture and is less sensitive in low light but from personal experience I find less noise and more light sensitivity than comparable CCD cameras, probably because the CMOS sensors and the signal processing in the EX cameras is state of the art compared to CCD cameras that have come to market within the last 5 or so years. CMOS is not affected by "vertical smear", takes less battery power and runs cooler than comparable CCD cameras.

The EX series cameras only output an HD SDI 4:2:2 signal. This effectively bypasses the Long GOP compression stage and takes the stream directly off the camera head. Companies like Convergent Design take advantage of this and can record directly to data cards at very low compression. Their recorder will even do 4:4:4 recording but the EX picture will not benefit from the increased colour space because you can't "invent" more colour information that wasn't there to begin with.

I don't know what else to add other than to strongly recommend you post any additional questions in the Sony CineAlta XDCAM forum, as there are more experienced compression experts who can give you real world feedback dealing with SDI output from these cameras. I'm just a simple "run and gun" person and have never used SDI output.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Brian Jacobs
Yes, I do understand that the HD/SDI signal is before the camera's internal compression and one can capture this as 4:2:2 10-bit uncompressed or even 4:4:4 uncompressed, depending on which camera and what the capture system is capable of - and hence there is an improvement in quality.

It seems clear to me the storage method employed by all these cameras now is the weak link. Whether AVCHD or Mpeg-2, whether tape or Hard Disk or solid-state card etc, they are all limited by the storage medium and therefore the compression format implemented to achieve adequate time-wise storage....

Don kindly replied and explained that the undoubted blurryness in moving parts of the images he shows are because of shutter speed 1/60th sec....decrease shutter speed and movement gets sharper.

I am trying to figure out what inherent problems exist with latest CMOS type sensors - shutter banding is one and that will not be solved by HD-SDI capture.

If there is a problem with movement, even after adjusting shutter speed to 1/125th or 1/250th sec - maybe this is due to very high compression when using camera's internal compression / storage systems -
maybe it is due to the response time in each pixel in CMOS sensor. I am trying to get a definitive answer to that question.

I am designing economical portable capture system for HDMI / HD-SDI to bypass bottleneck of all existing storage systems in latest cameras, hence these questions.....

Your further input highly appreciated...
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Rafael Amador
Hi Brian,
Just to add to the post of our dear Don, what you get through the HD/SD-SDI is the full 10b uncompress 422 signal before MPG2 compression.
I made few test recording through the AJA ioHD to Proress and the picture is incredible. Now I want one of those Convergent Design devices:-)
Rafael
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
Hi Brian,

I shot that footage in HQ 1080p 30 mode with the shutter speed set to 1/60th sec. so I'm assuming that the result is motion blur from the panning, much the same as following a target with a still camera and similar shutter setting. The HQ mode on the EX series cameras is 35 Mbits per second but the bit rate varies (VBR) depending on the change from one I frame to the next, so it's supposed to be much better than HDV in that respect.

For fast action shooting it's recommended to use the 720P 60 setting along with higher shutter speeds as this mode has twice the temporal resolution as 30p.

I can't answer your question about the 4:2:2 stream from the EX SDI port as I've never done a test for comparison. You're more than welcome to pose your question in Creative COW's Sony CineAlta - XDCAM forum. There are others that have carried out this test and would be happy to answer your query.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Brian Jacobs
Don, hi...

Thanks for a very informative and useful review...

Looking at the stills of your footage and reading your review it seems that there is significant blurring on anything moving within the frame. Would you agree with that statement and if yes, then in your opinion is it the result of the compression or just something that happens with CMOS sensors ? In other words, if you were capturing live direct from the camera via HD-SDI to a suitable editing station in full 4:4:4 10-bit uncompressed HD (1920 x 1080p), or even 4:2:2 10-bit uncompressed HD (1920 x 1080p) would even those parts of the image moving within the frame be as sharp as the rest (provided of course that they were in focus)....?

Brian Jacobs - bricyn786@yahoo.com
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
HI Peter,

You're most welcome. Does this mean I helped Sony sell yet another EX? :-) The secret to trouble-free EX file transfer and editing is to have a rock solid workflow in place before you ever push the record button. Peter, if you have any questions or concerns about the workflow or camera operation don't hesitate to ask them in the Sony CineAlta - XDCAM forum here at the COW.

The image quality of the EX is going to make you a very happy camper.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Peter Feysa
Thanks man, that does. Just working out all my paranoia before I get it...just attached to the mini-DV's I suppose, my security blanket. Cool, definitely will get it now. Thanks brother!
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
Hi Peter,

If you're referring to backing up in the field, then no I'm not all that concerned. I have yet to experience any problems transferring the files from the SxS Pro memory cards to the computer while on-site because I've been using an external firewire drive hooked up to my Macbook Pro. The process is dirt simple. I'm not converting the footage for use in my NLE at this point but am simply dragging the folder from the memory card to the hard drive. Then I use Sony's Clip Browser software to quickly review the clips to make sure everything transferred okay then I just delete the files off the card and put it back in the camera.

Back at the editing suite I always make copies of everything and have at least two separate hard drives to store the raw and converted files.

Transferring and archiving footage with the EX is pretty easy once you know the workflow. Using the Express 34 slot in my Macbook Pro on site I can transfer an hour of footage (16 gig card) to the external FW drive in about 5 1/2 minutes.

Hope this helps.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Peter Feysa
I am extremely close to buying the EX1, but before I do, I'm curious...Are you scared that your computer will crash and that you won't have your videos anymore? How do you back up your footage?
File didn't write using XDCAM EX
by Jon Collins
Thanks for the article.

I'm shooting with the XDCAM EX and one of my shots didn't write all the way. The movie file goes for two seconds and the take should have been a minute long. Has anyone else had this problem. Is it possible that it was an importing problem or did this happen in camera. My chip is already reformatted so I can't check the later.

Thanks for your help.
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by chuck cirino
This review has been quite helpful to me. If you would be so kind. Will the Sony EX1 work with the computer I'm considering buying below?

Dual 1.8GHz PowerPC G5 processors
900MHz per CPU frontside bus
2GB PC3200 DDR SDRAM
160GB SATA Hard Drive
Superdrive
ATI Radeon 9600 XT AGP Card 128MB VRAM
AirPort Extreme
Apple Pro keyboard and mouse
OS X 10.5.2 Leopard, Final Cut Studio 2, Logic Studio 8, Adobe CS3 Master Collection, Microsoft Office 2008, VectorWorks 2008, Maya Unlimited 2008 installed.
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by easyease
Don,
Thanks for your reply.
Even though I have not tested the EX1 personally, I now see that the rolling shutter issues are real even though the Sony rep said they weren't. I did a web search and it looks like strobes are indeed an issue for wedding shooters. My issue is with the frame by frame image distortion that makes doing any type of special effect impossible unless it is a locked down shot. So unfortunately for me I will stick with my Z1 for now but darn I need 24P bad.
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For James Carl:

I haven't had the need to apply the smooth cam filter to any footage yet but I'll let you know when I do. During normal EX1 shooting it's unlikely that you'll need to be worried about or will see any rolling shutter problems. Others have reported that still camera flashes in the frame are recording just fine. That's probably the most common issue that EX1 users were worried about.

Coming from your Z1U I can tell you what the EX1 WON'T have, and that's HDV-induced compression artifacts during fast action or quick panning/zooming sequences. I haven't been able to "break" the XDCAM codec yet.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For James Carroccio:

Yes, the import process is as simple as connecting the EX1 via USB and choosing: Import XDCAM from the Final Cut Pro menu. The codec used is an XDCAM version specific to the EX1. To oversimplify, it's the XDCAM codec but with an .mp4 wrapper. When imported, the Sony Transfer software removes the wrapper and it becomes a .mov file that is edited natively in FCP.

Hope this helps.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by easyease
I have a Z1U 3CCD Sony and I was waiting for the EX1 but I am VERY concerned about the rolling shutter effect. Apparently all CMOS sensors have this problem but I am wondering if you have tried to do any smooth cam stabilization on any footage?? This is the main thing that has stopped me from putting in my order. The other is how off balence this camera feels. I don't understand how Sony could design such a cool camera that is impossible to hold stable without a shoulder brace. The problem I have seen with CMOS sensors is that fast movements that get stabilized have a jello like effect. If you test the rolling shutter effect on your camera, will you post back? Thanks!
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by James Carroccio
hey don.

very informative. i, thinking about investing in this camera.

i was just concerned about the import process. is it as simple as using a usb via the import selection? what is the exact codec?

thx
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Chris Poisson
Hey Don,

Excellent, informative and "almost like being there" experience reading this review. I saw one of these at our local FCPUG meeting last week and was really impressed. If you recall, you recommended this camera to me almost a year ago when I started looking for an HD rig. Boy, you saw it coming alright. Thanks!
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For Stephan Stjerna:

"Did you have a chance to do any editing?"

No, unfortunately I haven't had a chance to do much of anything since my articles have been published since I've been rather busy with other things. In fact, I won't even be back home until the new year. However, others have stated that if you edit in a native XDCAM timeline it isn't much harder on the computer than editing DV 25 (MiniDV).

"I'm very close to getting this camera but I'm a bit worried about the audio"

I'm also going to have to disappoint you here as well, since I haven't had a chance to do any audio testing with the EX1. I do know that the camera will record 2 channels of PCM uncompressed audio, so I suspect that the quality will be somewhat better than what you've had to deal with in the past with other handheld cameras. One thing I know for sure is that the audio meters on the EX1 are a little slow to react, meaning that if the levels are too high the audio will distort before the meters go into the red zone. Something to be aware of, for sure.

Best regards,

Don Greening
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For David Wexler:

Thank you for your article comments and observations regarding the EX1 pros and cons. Sony wanted to develop and bring to market a high end camera for event people. It's my opinion that they've achieved their goal, as I've been waiting for a camera like this for the past 3 or 4 years. While the EX1 certainly isn't for everybody, there's going to be a lot of use for them in the film industry as B roll cameras/crash cams, etc. I've heard reports that the EX1 intercuts quite well with other cameras like the Sony F900, which is understandable since picture profiles can now be shared between all the Cine Alta series cameras.

Your EX1 observations are right on and I can only hope that feedback like yours will help Sony to improve the EX1 in future iterations.

"Multiple Frame rates (although it looks like we are still flagging frames here)"

I believe that this is done because 24p is not part of the SDI output spec, so the extra frames still need to be flagged for software editors in post.

Best regards,

Don Greening
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For sebastien thomas:

That's very strange. It asked for a backup, you say? Unfortunately I'm about 3500 miles away from my studio and can't try and duplicate your problem. When I get back home in the new year I'll check it out. Meanwhile, you may want to post your problem in the Sony CineAlta forum.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by sebastien thomas
I had a problem yesterday when FC2 asked for automatic backup of files while I was using the clip browser.
Finaly FCS2 crashed. Now every time I go to the File -> import -> Sony XDcam, FCS2 crashes (even after prefs removed and re-install of the xdcam import tool).
OsX 10.4.x (latest not Leopard), FCS 6.0.2 on a G5.
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For Rignold:

I've not had a chance to test the EX1 for green screen/chroma keying work, but I will tell you this: One of Creative COW's forum leaders, Gary Adcock has done green screen testing with the EX1 using the camera's HD SDI port and reported that he got consistent results.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For Sebastien THOMAS:

When I did my very first transfer I wasn't sure whether or not I needed the log and transfer window to be open before I went to the menu to choose: Import-XD CAM. In the article, I eluded to the fact that this step may not be necessary before importing XD CAM footage but I never tested my theory out before the test was complete.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Don Greening
For Bob Carpenter:

You can capture approximately 25 minutes of footage at the highest quality setting, which is called HQ35 VBR (variable bit rate) using an 8 Gbyte card. Double that for a 16 Gbyte card, etc. I'm assuming that 1080i and 1080p will take up the same amount of space on the card.

- Don
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by cine1138
After the review here I did a little personal detective work. I have recently shot with the F-23 which is an extremely power creative acquisition tool. This new Cine-Alta while not being in the same league as it's big brother (allthough I would love to see someone shoot some footage on both cameras and inter-cut them within the same scene) has some wonderful features, all of which I can't wait to test. At a glance my impressions are:
Pros:
Larger chip size (1/2 over 1/3)
Full 1920X1080
Multiple Frame rates (although it looks like we are still flagging frames here)
Histogram feature
Cons:
4:2:0 color sampling (why/why/why?)
Long GOP (Think DVC PRO HD / AVC Intra is better)
A Fuji Lens with not enough on the wide end (please get us out of the under 30mm with the prosumer style lenses) like a 28mm or a 24mm in 35mm
Equivalent

This said, I still need to test the camera and will call the BandPro folks this week!

DM Wexler
DoP
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Rignold
Hi Don

If you get round to it I would really like to know how the camera handles Chroma Keying. (Blue & Green)

Looks really good so far though. How long to transfer a full card to hard drive?
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by sesammedia
Thanks Don for a good review.
I have two questions.
Did you have a chance to do any editing? I've heard that the mpeg2 codec is hard on the computer, did you get a feel for that yet?
I'm very close to getting this camera but I'm a bit worried about the audio, all the handheld Sony's I have tested has a very compressed feel to the audio, has this improved in the EX1?
Thanks again for writing this article.

/Stefan
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Sebastien THOMAS
good review.
Why don't you use "import from XDCAM" option instead of log and capture ? this is one window faster :)
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Bob carpenter
Thanks for the review. How long can you capture 1080P to each card?
On Location with the Sony PMW-EX1 XDCAM EX
by Rafael Amador
Dear Don,
What a nice Christmas gift your article. I still have few weeks of suffering till I get my EX1.
Best wishes for the 2008, for you your wife and your EX:-)
rafael


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After 25 years as an editor, compositor, and VFX artist, frequent Creative COW poster and tutorial author Simon Ubsdell knows what he needs from a keyer -- and knew he wasn't getting good enough results from FCPX or Motion. Discussions in COW forums led him to create the highly regarded Hawaiki Keyer for Mac users using Apple Final Cut Pro X, Apple Motion, and Adobe After Effects and Premiere Pro on Mac as well. Enthusiasm expressed by COW members for its latest release led us to ask Simon for a tour of the even more advanced Hawaiki Keyer 3.0.

Tutorial
Simon Ubsdell
Cinematography
All Eyes on IBC 2016 for Cameras and Lenses Galore

All Eyes on IBC 2016 for Cameras and Lenses Galore

What’s that you say? An IBC that’s not only relevant, but downright exhilarating? This used to not be news, of course. However, in recent years, IBC has too often become simply an opportunity for European audiences to see products already announced at NAB. In 2016, however, the focus swings sharply to Amsterdam, especially when it comes to cameras and lenses. IBC 2016 is shaping up to be one of the most dramatic trade shows for cinematographers, broadcasters, and videographers in years. Join Creative COW Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a speedy overview of some of the highlights.

Feature
Tim Wilson
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