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Mastering CDs and DVDs for Mac OS9, OSX and Windows OS by Bob Hayes

COW Library : DVD Authoring Tutorials : Bob Hayes : Mastering CDs and DVDs for Mac OS9, OSX and Windows OS by Bob Hayes
'Mastering CDs and DVDs for Mac OS9, OSX and Windows OS' by Bob Hayes

A CreativeCow.net Process Overview




Bob Hayes
Bob Hayes
Artbeats Digital Film Library
Myrtle Creek, Oregon USA

©2002 by Artbeats and Bob Hayes. All rights are reserved.
This edition also contains additional production copyrights by CreativeCow.net.


Article Focus:
Bob Hayes, one of the nicest guys in the industry and the master of all things technical at Artbeats, shares the process he uses to create dual-formatted discs that look and behave properly for both Mac and PC users. While this article centers around Roxio® Toast™, the principles can be applied to many other tools in use in the market. Taken from a white paper created for the Artbeats Team, we have repurposed it here for the benefit of Creative Cow members.


Mastering discs for OS X, OS 9, and Windows...

Introduction:

When mastering to a CD, we can make a hybrid Mac and Windows CD where the Mac users only see the Mac items and the Windows users only see the Windows items. Some of this data might actually be shared between the two partitions, even having a different name for Mac or Windows. But when we make a data DVD, all users see all the files on the disc. So, Mac users will see things like Windows programs that they cannot run (".exe" files) and Windows users will see Mac programs, etc etc.

But we can make it as neat as possible for both sets of users. First of all, what data do we have that both Mac and Windows users need? The QuickTime clips, of course. So, as long as we always include the Windows filename extensions (.mov for QuickTime movies) and keep the file & folder names legal (just use standard alphanumeric characters, nothing fancy, and avoid starting with spaces), both Mac and Windows users will see that. Then we can put all the Mac programs or installers in a folder called, for instance, "Mac OS Software" and the Windows specific stuff in a folder called "Windows Software" so that we at least tidy up the root of the disc.

That limits what the users see. But what about layout? When you insert a disc in a Windows PC, the files and folders just show up however the user has everything configured. Sometimes icon view, sometimes list view, sorted alphabetically or by date, whatever. But Mac CDs normally have the icons arranged in a neat pattern or the window is set to list view or whatever, and these settings stick to the disc when we put it in a different machine. Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X handle this disc related arrangement differently. So, we should make sure that both Mac systems "see" the folders arranged in whatever pattern we choose. This is easy enough if we follow a few basic
steps.


Create your partition

You will need to create a partition for your DVD master. This can be a Toast temporary partition or a true drive partition. Just make sure that if it is larger than 4.7-ish GB, you don't copy more data to it than your DVD can hold. A true drive partition rather than a Toast temporary partition really makes things easier, so if at all possible, do that.


Arrange in OS 9

Then, boot using OS 9 and copy your data to your partition. Arrange your windows how you want them for OS 9. Have the windows cascade or open where you want them to, icon view or list view, etc etc. Karl Bunker's Neatnik app is an excellent utility to do this, BTW.


Arrange in OS X

Now boot in OS X. If you look at the partition you created and arranged in OS 9, you will see that there is a folder called "Desktop Folder" that is visible in OS X but invisible in OS 9. Anything that is on the desktop for the partition you created in OS 9 would be in this folder. That's bad form for a CD or DVD anyway, so don't leave anything on the desktop. Remember that each partition in OS 9 has its own desktop, so just because something shows on your desktop in OS 9 doesn't mean it's on that partition. It might be on your boot partition. Using File Buddy (or similar) in OS X, find the "Desktop Folder" and make it invisible. All the other oddball files should be invisible by default. I've actually deleted that folder in OS X with no ill effects, but your mileage may vary. Best to simply make it invisible.

Now arrange the windows and set the view settings however you want in OS X. This can be a little tricky in OS X because of the settings to open new folders in the same window or a new window and the fact that View Options can be set globally or only for the specific folder. Just pay attention to that and you'll be fine. OS X gets the initial Finder window settings for each window from the OS 9 desktop files if they are present or the default OS X views settings if the desktop files are not present. If you open a disc mastered in OS 9, the files will be arranged according to whatever method was used in OS 9 (with certain exceptions). The problem with this is the fact that an icon layout that looks great in OS 9 may be too crowded in OS X because of the different system font settings and icon sizes and so forth. OS 9 uses icons 32 pixels square, but OS X supports icons up to 128 pixels square and the default is 48 pixels. Also, OS 9 by default uses 10 pt Geneva for file names and OS X uses a 12 point font whose name escapes me at the moment. And of course, if the user has customized the global view settings in OS X, that takes effect and can just mess everything up. All these problems are easily overcome by arranging the disc layout in OS X. To make the settings "stick" to the folder or disc, you need to logout or unmount the partition. There are probably other methods for this, but logging out is easy enough or use Disk Utility to unmount that partition. Dragging the partition to the trash will unmount all partitions for that physical drive, which is inconvenient.

Be aware that when you open a subfolder in OS X and do some rearranging of the stuff in the folder or of the folder window, you stand a good chance of creating a ".DS_Store" file for the specific folder. If you want every folder on your disc to have specific settings, that's fine. If you don't, you can safely delete the .DS_Store files using Terminal. Just "cd" to the appropriate directory, do an "ls -al" to see the .DS_Store (and all other unix invisibles) and then type "rm .DS_Store".

Next, launch Toast, select DVD for the disc type, drag your partition in there and you should be good to go. All the mysterious Mac only files (.DS_Store, .FBCIndex, .FBCLockFolder, & .Trashes for OS X and Desktop Folder, Temporary Items, TheFindByContentFolder, & TheVolumeSettingsFolder for OS 9) will be invisible to Mac users and most Windows users, plus the folders will be arranged in whatever neat pattern you specify. If you are creating a hybrid Mac HFS/ISO9660 CD, you can go click the "Select ISO" button and remove all the Mac specific files that ended up in ISO partition. The remove button just removes them from the ISO partition, not from the actual disc.


Final thoughts

You might ask yourself, what about a partition that I formatted in OS X? Good thought. When you copy files and folders using the Finder, the invisible Desktop DF and Desktop DB files will be created. Folders will open to icon view and files will be arranged within those folder by name. New folders will open directly on top of the parent. One problem is that for OS9, the icons will most likely be generic even for apps that the user has installed. If you keep the .DS_Store files, they will control the look of the windows in OS X, otherwise it will be the default.

###

with special thanks to Bob Hayes and the Artbeats Digital Film Library team for this tutorial...



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