LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Batch Export Script

Batch Export Script
Creativecow.net Leitch dpsVelocity Tutorial


Virtual AVI in Leitch dpsVelocity

John David Hutton
John David Hutton
mYth productions
Kansas City, Kansas, USA

©2006 John David Hutton and Creativecow.net. All rights are reserved.

Article Focus:
In this article, John David Hutton explains the batch export script he has written and how to use it to automate the exporting of multiple timelines with the same format in Velocity.


Batch Export.  What Is It?


Batch export is a function currently missing in velocity.  It allows multiple timelines to be exported in the same format without having to baby-sit each timeline.  Since version 9, velocity will handle up to 100 timelines per version and 20 versions per project.  That means one project can potentially hold up to 2000 timelines!  Currently, velocity has a “batch export” function that will export the same timeline into multiple file formats, but in our workflow that isn’t nearly as helpful as exporting multiple timelines to the same format.  So I sat down and wrote a batch export script written in Vbscript to automate the exporting of these timelines.



What Is Vbscript?


This is a script language native to windows, specifically windows XP.  It should run on any default XP box.  This means once you have it on your hard drive, simply double-click it.  For Velocity, you may find it more useful to assign it to a quick key so you don’t have to retreat to your file explorer to run it.  The script will work either way, assigning it to a keyboard hotkey is merely a convenience.

Note:  Historically, Vbscript has served as a tool for hackers to take control of your windows system.  Because of this, anti-virus tools are very leery of allowing scripts to run without your knowledge.  The first time you run this tool, you may get a notification that this script is going to run and will ask for your permission.  In Norton Anti-Virus, simply choose “Authorize” and you shouldn’t receive this again.  In other circumstances, you may need to adjust your anti-virus to allow this script to run.  I’m assuming this will run unhindered in XP SP2 but I’ve only been using it on SP1 currently.


What Does It Do?


The first thing the script will do is gather information it can’t collect itself.  Most importantly, the number of timelines you wish to export and the duration it needs to wait for each timeline to finish.  The script won’t know when velocity is done with each timeline so you simply have to input the time of your longest timeline in seconds.  In addition, the script will ask if you want to perform an optional “movie range” function.  If you choose “yes”, it will ask for the in and outs you’d like to use and then perform those same ins and outs on all of the timelines (based on the number of timelines you gave it in the previous dialog).  This function is most helpful if you have a lot of timelines that share the same in and out points (if you have a lot of thirty second spots starting and ending at the same time, for example).  This is merely a time-saver function and not necessary to run for the batch export to complete successfully.  You may manually set the movie ranges on each timeline if you wish.

 

The script will pop up dialogs reminding you of some of these things to be sure of before you launch the batch export, but here they are again for reference:

  • Be sure to map your hotkeys to those mentioned at the top of the batchexport.vbs document.
     
  • Be sure to go through the movie export once in velocity so it will remember your settings.  For example, if you want to export a hundred timelines in windows media format (.wmv) then first you’ll want to go to the first timeline, choose movie export, choose the compression rate, choose the path and filename, then hit export.  It’s only necessary to start this export for a second or two, then hit cancel.  Velocity will remember the last settings used and the script will use those settings when it runs.  If you don’t actually start a batch export, I think velocity will remember your file format settings but not your path (assuming you changed it).  So it’s usually safer to just get into the habit of briefly starting one batch export to the desired path and with the desired file format.

  • A few other dialogs will pop up reminding you of various things.  For example, the current version of velocity will allow you to export a timeline that’s not rendered (assuming it needs rendering at all).  One of the reminders is to render the timeline if it needs to before exporting.  Also, there is not currently any cycle bin backwards functionality, so your first timeline may not be selected before it starts.  If it’s not selected, simply alt-tab to velocity, pull first timeline forward, then alt-tab back to script.

  • After it’s done collecting information it will run.  What it’s doing through each iteration is performing the exact same keystrokes the user would perform if they were sitting there.  This is why assigning hotkeys is important and this is also why setting the correct duration is important, the script doesn’t know when velocity is finished and velocity won’t accept commands if it’s still exporting a timeline.  All you have to remember is to input the timeline’s duration in seconds.  If your movie range is 40 seconds for each timeline, you’d enter 40.  You can enter higher numbers if you like as this will allow your system more time to complete each timeline.  This is a safer way to go if you think your computer may take longer than real-time to complete a timeline.  For example, if you’re exporting a quicktime “animation” .mov file it’s likely the computer won’t be able to spit it out in real-time.  You can run the timeline once to test how long it will take.  Again, putting in a few more seconds never hurts.

  • Do not use the system while batch export is running.  It’s possible to use the system while a timeline is exporting but if you happen to be switched away from velocity during the time where it’s supposed to switch timelines it will likely fail in some way and you’ll need to cancel and restart the script from that timeline.



What It Currently Won’t Do


  • Currently, it won’t switch timeline bins so everything you want to render has to be in the same timeline bin.  This holds true for versions – the script won’t switch versions and begin rendering on those timelines either.  Currently, one timeline bin will hold up to 100 timelines so this is the maximum number the script currently supports.  Feel free to improve upon this if you have the time / inclination.  If you do, please share it with everyone else!  J

  • It won’t be able to guess how long each timeline is, so if you have timelines of varying lengths you have to use the length of your longest timeline.  This also means it will be slower as it will have to wait that amount of time between each timeline before starting another export.

  • It won’t allow you to use your edit suite much during this process.  This includes alt-tabbing to another program while it’s running.  The script does have a limited capability of switching back to velocity but it isn’t perfect and I can’t guarantee there won’t be problems if you’re working in another program.  Remember, once the duration is up the script is sending commands to your computer, so if you’re in another program and the script doesn’t successfully switch you back to velocity it will send those commands into the wrong program.  I don’t forsee this as being a huge deal but something for you to keep in mind.

  • This won’t work on velocity for Reality as this script will only work on Velocity 9.1.36 and newer.  Development stopped on the reality platform at version 8.2 and some features aren’t implemented in that version that this script needs.  It should work in VelocityHD however as the commands and functions are the same between it and VelocityQ.  As of this writing I have not been able to confirm this as I’m still on VelocityQ.

  • It won’t name the timeline’s exports something different than they already are, one of the required features of this script is that the timeline filename is by default the same as the timeline name.
  • It won’t allow exporting multiple timelines into multiple formats, this will only exporting multiple timelines into the same format.


What Do I Need To Run It?


This should work in Velocity 9.1.36 and later.  Once you download it, you’ll want to right-click on it and choose “edit” to open the script in notepad.  At the top of the document is a brief explanation of some hotkeys to map so the script will function correctly on your velocity system.  Some of these will already be mapped, others will not.  It’s possible to change which hotkeys the script uses but it’s recommended to use those mentioned in the document.



Can Vbscript Be Used To Control Other Applications Besides Velocity?



Yes.  Also, feel free to improve upon this script as well.  It’s possible to add functionality to this script – ie. the capability of logging what it’s done as well as notify you in various ways that it’s completed and explain what it’s done, including emailing you.  This is more complicated to code and the steps required to pull these features off will differ by system, so I didn’t include these capabilities in this version.  For now, I wanted to allow an editor to start a batch export (any real-time format) and be able to leave the workstation to do other things, like go to lunch or home, work on other duties, etc.



Summary

This is an automation script that will aid you in batch exporting many timelines to the same file format from within Velocity.  This will free you up to do other things while it’s being performed.  Hopefully this will help everyone who routinely has a need to export lots of timelines.

This script would not have been possible without Leitch’s commitment to customer service.  I personally thank Bob Bolson and others at Leitch (now Harris) for going the extra mile by putting new hotkey capabilities in place.  Hopefully we will all benefit from this script and these new features.


Download and Install

Have fun!

- mYthprod
(John David Hutton)
Feel free to comment or ask questions in the Leitch dps Velocity forum at Creativecow.net.

* Build Your Own VelocityQ. See how *




Please visit the forums or read other articles at Creativecow.net if you found this page from a direct link.



Related Articles / Tutorials:
Leitch dpsVelocity
VelocityHD and VelocityQ Training 101

VelocityHD and VelocityQ Training 101

Creative Cow leader Lyn Norstad takes a look at Mike Harper's unique DVD video training program for the Velocity HD and Velocity Q packages from Leitch (now a division Harris.)

Review
Lyn Norstad
Leitch dpsVelocity
Virtual AVI in Leitch dpsVelocity

Virtual AVI in Leitch dpsVelocity

Virtual AVI: It sounds kind of cryptic but it's a very cool thing Leitch provides to VelocityQ users for free. In this article, John David Hutton tells us why and how to use it. Think of it as a translator - it's the middle-man between your AVI-loving apps and your proprietary video format (files with extension .dps). It does 2 things, it lets you render OUT dps files from programs that wouldn't normally allow this and it lets you bring in dps files into programs that wouldn't normally allow it.

Tutorial
John David Hutton
Leitch dpsVelocity
Capturing Windows Media Directly using Leitch Velocity plug-ins

Capturing Windows Media Directly using Leitch Velocity plug-ins

Among many of Velocity's strengths is its plug-ins. Using one of these plug-ins in the ''Qtools'' bundle (free), you can actually capture to windows media or real media directly, without capturing to hard drives first and then crunching. In this tutorial, John David Hutton demonstrates a windows media capture but the steps should be very similar for real media.

Tutorial
John David Hutton
Recent Articles / Tutorials:
Art of the Edit
TV Workflow Supervisor Kylee Peña: The Benefits of Pressure

TV Workflow Supervisor Kylee Peña: The Benefits of Pressure

TV workflow supervisor Kylee Peña (Jane the Virgin, Colony) visits Adobe's "Make It" talk show to chat with host Jason Levine about the evolution of motion picture workflows, from the days of film and tape to our modern digital world of crazy-high shooting ratios and constantly evolving technology. She also expounds on the upside to creative constraints and tight deadlines. And don’t miss the lightning round!!!

Feature, People / Interview
Cow News
Color Grading
Grading The LEGO Batman Movie: Animal Logic and FilmLight

Grading The LEGO Batman Movie: Animal Logic and FilmLight

Following successful collaborations on The Matrix, Legends of the Guardians, and Happy Feet, Sydney's Animal Logic worked with Warner Bros on The LEGO Movie from pitch to proof of concept to post. Animal Logic has gone even further on the latest LEGO animated feature, The LEGO Batman Movie, where they were embedded with the production for over a year. The range of their work pushed every aspect of the Baselight system for editorial, VFX, and HDR not just for post, but for the entire production process.

Feature
COW News
An Editor's Epic Journey, by Katie Toomey

An Editor's Epic Journey, by Katie Toomey

What do you do when your company folds and there's no local work? Whatever you have to. For Katie Toomey, that meant emptying her savings and heading 2000 miles west to Los Angeles, with no job in hand. The only options were make it or break it. The journey itself was difficult, but the hardest part may have been the only thing that made it all possible: asking for help. This is a truly inspiring story with tons of real-world examples of how to accomplish what feels impossible at the time.


Katie Toomey
DaVinci Resolve
Fairlight + Resolve, Part 1: The DAWn of a Resolved Era

Fairlight + Resolve, Part 1: The DAWn of a Resolved Era

Marco Solorio of OneRiver Media gives an introductory overview to the rebirth of the Fairlight digital audio workstation (DAW) that is now part of Blackmagic Design’s powerful DaVinci Resolve post-production system. Is this finally the solution to break away from the Pro Tools stronghold?

Review, Editorial, Feature
Marco Solorio
NAB Show
Bob Zelin's NAB Show, Take 2017

Bob Zelin's NAB Show, Take 2017

Longtime broadcast engineer, facilities designer, and workflow consultant Bob Zelin has been attending the NAB Show for years, and his legendary write-ups have gone to unparalleled lengths to bring you hidden gems from every corner of the floor. Bob is taking a slightly different approach this time, as he views the specifics through the lens of trends that have been emerging for quite some time, now bearing fruit in 2017. Sit back and enjoy another real-world, hype-free, anything-but-objective ride through the industry's biggest week of the year.

Feature
Bob Zelin
RED Camera
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2: Behind the Scenes with RED

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2: Behind the Scenes with RED

Anticipation for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 was already heated up when director James Gunn announced that it was to be the first feature film captured with the RED WEAPON camera using an 8K RED DRAGON VV sensor. In this marvelous behind the scenes featurette courtesy RED Digital Cinema, James discusses the decision to use the RED WEAPON, and how it played out with director of photography Henry Braham, BSC. Both of them found the combination of the massive sensor and small form factor incredibly compelling, providing them the technology to capture the epic scale of the action, in a package small enough to allow them to get exceptionally close to the scenes of genuine intimacy that are this series' secret weapon. (See what we did there?)

Editorial, Feature
Tim Wilson
Art of the Edit
The Science of Editing: Look Closer -- The Mind of a Film

The Science of Editing: Look Closer -- The Mind of a Film

When you ask an editor what they DO in the edit suite, the answer is often something like, "Well, it's intuitive." To become better editors, though, we need to be more specific. Editor, author, and professor Dr. Karen Pearlman breaks down the process into five specific steps that editors must take in order to turn a mass of material into something coherent. You can learn to hone the specific skills of observation and self-awareness that distinguish editors from other observers, and make unexpected connections that move stories in compelling new directions. Sven Pape of "This Guy Edits" presents his conversation with Karen in the form of a powerful video essay that you will find illuminating and inspiring, and will be able to start using right away.

Tutorial, Feature, People / Interview
Sven Pape
MORE
© 2017 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]