LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Bullet-Time Effect in Adobe Premiere

Creating the Bullet-Time Effect in Premiere using WinMorph
Bullet Time in Premiere using WinMorph

Satish Kumar Satish Kumar
Video/graphics enthusiast and software developer
http://www.debugmode.com/
San Diego, California, USA

©2002, 2003, 2004 Satish Kumar and Creativecow.net. All rights reserved.


Article Focus:
In this tutorial, Satish Kumar demonstrates the famous Matrix style Bullet-time effect in Premiere: A man leaps in the air with a gun, fires a shot, and then hovers in the air while the camera moves around him 180 degrees. To create this effect, we have the shot of the man leaping in the air as a video and 6 still shots of him in the air at different angles. We will morph between the still shots using the WinMorph plug-in for Premiere. This morphed video is composited with a moving background giving the 180 degree camera rotation effect.

To create the moving background, different shots of the same background were taken and stitched together in an image editor. This is very similar to the method used to create panoramic views of a scene.

The sample video and shots are used with permission from Marco von Moos. Thank you very much Marco.

Here is a rendered output of the tutorial Premiere project - btime_premiere.mov, to have a look before starting.

The beginning video shot with the guy leaping in the air...

The 6 shots of the guy leaping in the air, taken at different angles... The images are TGA files, with the blue portions keyed for transparency.

The stitched background...

The files to use for this tutorial (including the premiere project) can be downloaded here. The Free WinMorph plug-in for Premiere (Windows only!) can be downloaded here. You need to have WinMorph installed for this tutorial. Help and tutorials on how to use WinMorph can be found in the above page.

Here is how we do the effect in Premiere.

First create a project with dimensions 420x184 (that is the size of the images/videos we will be using). Import all the files in the above zip file into the project.

Insert Image1 and Image2 into Video1A and Video1B tracks. Re-size them to be exactly 4 frames long. Go to the "Transitions" window and you will find the "Morph - WinMorph" transition under the "DebugMode" category. Insert that transition between the two images in the timeline. Similarly, insert Image 2 and Image 3 into Video 1A and Video 1B tracks next to the first pair of images. Re-size them to be of 4 frames in length and insert the Morph transition between them. Do the same way for Images 3 to 6. After this, the timeline will be as shown below...

Now double-click the first Morph transition and it will open the transition settings dialog. Click "Custom" to open the WinMorph window. Draw the required shapes and associate them with their corresponding shapes.. (This tutorial will not go into detail on how to use WinMorph, you can find tutorials for WinMorph at the download page mentioned above). Once you are done with drawing the shapes, the WinMorph window will look like shown below...

Close WinMorph and return to Premiere. Press "OK" in the transition settings dialog to save the settings and close the dialog. Similarly, open the second Morph transition dialog and do the editing in WinMorph. Do the same process for all five transitions. Once you have completed drawing the shapes for all five Morph transitions, the core work is done. Now all that is remaining is to composite the tracks.

First insert the "start.avi" file into the timeline next to the five images in Video 1A. Insert the "backgnd.jpg" next to this in the timeline. Our idea is to first run the start.avi clip and once the guy has leaped into the air, use the stitched background still image to pan from beginning to ending (this will appear as if the camera is rotating from the guy to the other side, like a panoramic view). On top of this panned background we will place the morph sequence to create the effect.

To pan the background still image, use the "Motion settings" for that element and pan the shot from left to right. You can view how it is done from the Premiere project.

Now we have to place the morph sequence in tracks above Video 1. This is not directly possible in Premiere since transitions can only be placed between Video 1A and 1B. So we have to use a technique called "Virtual clip" (you can find more about virtual clips at here). Choose the "Block select tool" in the Timeline tool palette, and select frames 1 to 4 in the timeline (these contain image 1 and image 2 with a morph between them). Now if you drag the selected portion and drop it on track Video 2, a virtual clip will be created. Now this virtual clip is actually a copy of the rendered portion of frames 1 to 4, and we can place it anywhere. Drag it and place just above the start of the image "backgnd.jpg" in the timeline.

Similarly, select frames 5-8 and drag onto track Video 3 next to the first virtual clip. Same way for frames 9-12, 13-16 and 17-20. Select each of these virtual clips and set their transparency to "alpha channel". The timeline will look like shown below.

That's all folks, we have finished our tutorial. You need to render only from the beginning of "start.avi" (i.e. from frame 21 onwards). Render and see the result. There may be a few glitches when you watch it frame by frame, but the aim of this tutorial is to demonstrate using WinMorph to create a "Bullet Time Effect".

The original tutorial created by Marco von Moos can be found at http://www.nccinema.ch/esfx11.html
All graphics, ideas, etc. are used by permission in this Creativecow version.


Please visit the forums and read other articles at Creativecow.net if you found this page from a direct link.

 

 



Related Articles / Tutorials:
Adobe Premiere Pro
Working with Audio in Adobe Premiere Pro

Working with Audio in Adobe Premiere Pro

Want to learn how to add music and sound effects to your videos using Adobe Premiere Pro? Tobias Gleissenberger of Surfaced Studio will teach you all you need to know about adding music and sound effects to your projects, creating and using submixes, working with audio keyframes, and much more.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
Top 10 Adobe Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Top 10 Adobe Premiere Pro Keyboard Shortcuts

Join Tobias Gleissenberger for an energetic look at the top ten keyboard shortcuts Adobe Premiere Pro. These essential tips will greatly improve your efficiency and help you optimise your editing workflow!

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Premiere Pro for Absolute Beginners

Adobe Premiere Pro for Absolute Beginners

New to Premiere Pro? In this tutorial, Tobias will show you how to create a video using Adobe Premiere Pro.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Adobe Premiere Pro
PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips

PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips

With the popularity of HD-DSLRs, many shooters are recording sound separately because of the camera’s limitations with audio -- but putting audio and video together in post can be a chore. Longtime spots ace Bill O'Neil has been dealing with this over the past several years , and has found PluralEyes from Red Giant to be fast, easy, and effective. Take a look to see if PluralEyes will help you, too.

Review, Editorial, Feature
Bill O'Neil
Adobe Premiere Pro
Adobe Premiere Pro CC's Lumetri Color Tool: Gamechanger

Adobe Premiere Pro CC's Lumetri Color Tool: Gamechanger

Longtime Creative COW Leader and passionate color grader Walter Biscardi notes that the word "gamechanger" gets thrown around too easily, but for color grading inside an NLE, Adobe Premiere Pro CC's new Lumetri Color Tool, "gamechanger" is the only word that will do.

Feature
Walter Biscardi
Adobe Premiere Pro
Misery Loves Comedy: Comedian Kevin Pollak Cuts His Docu

Misery Loves Comedy: Comedian Kevin Pollak Cuts His Docu

Comedian and actor Kevin Pollak talks about directing and editing his documentary "Misery Loves Comedy", a film that explores the darker side of comedians. After three software lessons from editor (and renowned VFX supervisor) Rob Legato and ten months at the console, Pollak has some new insight about the cross-over between stand-up comedy and editing.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Purrrfect Videos with Adobe Premiere Clip for Cat Day

Purrrfect Videos with Adobe Premiere Clip for Cat Day

The Premiere Clip app is a great way to get started in shooting, editing and sharing your own videos, and today Adobe is encouraging everyone to sink their claws into a cat video of their own for National Cat Day.

Editorial, Feature
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Gone Girl: Editing a Hollywood Feature with Adobe Premiere

Gone Girl: Editing a Hollywood Feature with Adobe Premiere

David Fincher's "Gone Girl" is the latest in a series of critically acclaimed films from the director, but it's the first studio feature edited with Adobe Premiere Pro, with a complex post production workflow that includes 6K acquisition and over 200 visual effects completed in house with the help of Dynamic Link and After Effects.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Adobe Premiere Pro
Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

Cooking With Premiere Pro CC on PBS's America's Test Kitchen

As America's Test Kitchen enters its 15th season on PBS, they've made the switch to Premiere Pro Creative Cloud. Post-production Supervisor and director Herb Sevush has been with the show from the beginning, and confessed some trepidation moving away from FCP 7, but has found it to be a great fit for their data-intensive, increasingly 4K multicam production, and his work with remote editors. Here, Herb offers some insights into both the why and the how of their switch, with special attention to Premiere Pro CC's approach to multicam.

Editorial, Feature
Herb Sevush
Adobe Premiere Pro
Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin

Seasoned Film Editor Takes Adobe Premiere Pro CC For a Spin

Customizable interface, visual effects integration, and fast rendering time impressed long-time Avid editor and second generation filmmaker, Nicolas de Toth. Nicolas recently enjoyed the opportunity to edit a commercial for MagnaFlow and chose to work with Adobe Premiere Pro for the first time in his career.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Adobe
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]