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Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro

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Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro
A Creative COW Final Cut Pro Tutorial

Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro

Stephen Smith Stephen Smith
Lone Peak Productions, Inc.
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

©Copyright 2005 Stephen Smith and Creativecow.net. All Rights Reserved

Article Focus:
Do you want to create that old film look with out purchasing expensive plug-ins? Unfortunately, Quick Time’s special effects settings create phony looking scratches. This article by Stephen Smith explores how to add that extra bit of pizzazz without breaking the bank.


This tutorial has been updated, click here to view updated version.


Let's begin:
Traditionally old film is not in color. Turning your video to black & white or sepia gives it that old fashioned look.

Download Film Sample Project here -- If you experience problems with downloading, right click and choose 'save as' option

Download Old Film Sample movie here


1. Black & White or Sepia

Black & White

  • Select the desired clip in the time line.
  • Choose Effects > Video Filters > Color Correction > Color Corrector 3-Way.
  • Double click on your clip and then select the Color Corrector 3-way tab in the viewer. Drag the Sat (Saturation) slider tab to the far left.
  • Drag the Whites slider to the right and the Blacks slider to the left slightly, this will add more contrast to your clip and make it feel more dimensional.


Sepia

  • Select the desired clip in the time line.
  • Choose Effects > Video Filters > Image Control > Sepia.
  • Double click on your clip and then select the Filters tab in the viewer.
  • Change the highlight amount to give the clip a more realistic sepia color. I find 33 works well for a lot of clips but it does vary.
  • Click on the triangle in the Tint Color box and then adjust the S slider to give your clip a more faded look. I find 58 works well in a lot of situations.


Final Cut Pro Filters


2. Export Clip


This is where you get to add all of the visual effects that are associated with old or damaged film.

  • Mark in and out points on the timeline of the clip or clips you wish to give that old film look to.
  • Choose File > Export > Using Quick Time Conversion.
  • Give the clip a name, locate where you would like to place it and select what format would work best.
  • Click the Options button. In the video settings section select the Filter button.
  • Click on the triangle next to the text Special Effects. Then select Film Noise.


FCP Special Effects

  • Click on the Hairs button and change it to Scratches. Set Scratch Density to 0.
  • Adjust the Dust and Film Fading > Film Fading setting to None.
  • Change the Hairs settings and the Dust and Film Fading settings to your liking. I adjusted the Hairs > Hair Density to 48, while I bumped the Hair > Hair Length to 47.
  • Click Ok and then click Ok again in the Movie Settings box. Then click on the Save button.
  • When the clip is done exporting your in and out points remain on the timeline. Repeat steps A through D and then change the Scratches > Scratch Density from zero to around 6. Don’t worry about the scratches looking fake, that will be remedied in the next section.
  • Click Ok and then click Ok again in the Movie Settings box. Then click on the Save button.



3. Double Clips up


This section will take the edge off of the fake looking scratches.

  • Import the two clips and drag them into the timeline.
  • Place the clip with the scratches on top of the clip with out.
  • Drop the opacity of the top clip to about 30 percent.



4. Add Flicker


This step adds that extra touch of believability to that old film look.

  • In the Viewer click on the A in the film strip.


Final Cut Pro Video

  • In the drop down menu drag the mouse to the word Matte. Then click on the word Color from the menu that pops out of the side.


Final Cut Pro Matte Color

  • In the Viewer select the Controls tab and then click on the gray box.
  • Change the color to black and hit OK.
  • Select the Video tab and then drag the matte to the track above your two clips in the Timeline.
  • Click on the Clip Overlays button on the Timeline and lower the clips’ opacity to 17.

FCP Clip Overlays

  • Select the pen tool from the Tool Pallet.
  • Add a keyframe to every four frames of the matte. Then drag every other keyframe to zero opacity.


FCP Matte Keyframes


Voila! You can now enjoy adding old fashioned charm to your video clips for a price that is hard to argue with. Feel free to discuss this technique in the Final Cut Pro forum at Creativecow.net.





Comments

Re: Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro
by Stephen Smith
Thanks for the kind words. I'm happy to help. If you have the newest Final Cut Studio be sure to check out the "Bad Film" filter.



Stephen Smith
Utah Video Productions

Check out my Motion Training DVD

Check out my Motion Tutorials
Re: Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro
by Lee-Anne Holmes
Thanks so much! That tutorial helped me out in a big way.
Awesome! Looks great. I added some
by Lev Mergian
Awesome! Looks great. I added some vignette to it too and it looks wonderful. Thanks
Creating That Old Film Look For Final Cut Pro
by Stephen Smith
This tutorial has been updated. Click here to see the updated Old Film Look for Final Cut Pro video tutoria...


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