LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Low Cost Professional Lighting Solutions

COW Library : Lighting Design Tutorials : Leo Ticheli : Low Cost Professional Lighting Solutions
Low Cost Professional Lighting Solutions



A Creative COW Lighting Design Feature



Leo Ticheli <lticheli@ltpro.com>
Leo Ticheli Productions
Birmingham, Alabama / Atlanta, Georgia USA

Article Focus:
In this article, Leo Ticheli looks at some of the lower-cost options for acheiving beautifully lit professional lighting design for your shoots. These solutions aren't the 'G.E. bulb in a cardboard box' solutions that some try to point to around the Net and elsewhere as acceptable low-cost lighting -- but if you are looking for professional lighting done on a budget, then Leo has some great information for you...

Many here at Creative Cow have asked for recommendations regarding professional low-cost lighting design packages, so I’ve put together a few systems for your consideration. Please understand that no single package will do everything unless it arrives in a 40’ trailer -- well, maybe a couple of them.

You can get these packages new for about the figures I’ve suggested, but you might consider used gear. Just make sure that it’s from a reputable seller/reseller. But keep in mind that you will also need some additional grip gear and accessories, so be sure to allow for that in your budgeting. Don’t forget spare lamps, at least one of each size.


Interview with daylight sources in the shot; Kino Flo based. Around $1,800:

Key Light: Kino Flo 4’ x 4 Bank tubed for daylight.
Kick & Background Light: Mole Richardson or equivalent Fresnel.
(You need a couple of these, one 650W and one 300W)


Interview; smaller area with daylight sources in the shot; Kino Flo based. Around $1,150:

Key Light: Kino Flo Diva 200 tubed for daylight.
Of course the Diva 400 is a stop brighter, but it costs a lot more.
Kick & Background Light: Mole Richardson or equivalent Fresnel.
You need a couple of these, one 650W and one 300W.


Interview; small area, open-faced based. Around $1,000:

Key Light: Mole Richardson 2K Mighty Mole or equivalent.
You can bash this through a silk or other diffusion. You’ll need a couple of C-stands to hold the silk; you can make do with just one C-stand with a grip arm for a smaller soft source.
Kick & Background Light: Mole Richardson or equivalent Fresnel.
You need a couple of these, one 650W and one 300W.

Note: If you have daylight windows in the shot, you must put blue gel on your lights, and this really cuts the punch; that’s why you need the 2K. If you don’t have daylight windows in the shot, you can use a smaller Key such as the 1K Mickey Mole and save a few dollars, but it’s not as good a value.


Other stuff you’ll need:

C-stands,
clamps,
gaffer tape,
clothespins,
flags,
nets…

The list goes on and on. Chances are you’ll never stop adding to it.


When I’m doing location work, I use the following package:

  • Kino Flo 4’ x 4 bank. My primary Key these days.
  • Kino Flo Diva’s. I’m using these as soft Kicks and Key’s for multiple subject positions or very tight places.
  • 1200W HMI with 4’ x 6’ Chimera. Don’t use this anymore unless I’m lighting a larger area. Great for a lobby shot or one with a lot of subject movement.
  • Mole Richardson 650 Tweenie’s.
  • Mole Richardson 200 Betweenie’s.
  • The Kitchen Sink. Mini Flo’s, a few 200W Fresnel’s, a Mighty Mole, etc.

I sometimes put a bit of half-blue gel on the Fresnel’s, but usually leave them warm because I like to suggest that the kick and background light is coming from warm practicals.

About the Mole Richardson Tungsten Lights; I suggest these because I've found that they hold up under hard use. Perhaps some have had good experiences with other brands; I have not. The Kino Flo's are industry standard for good reason; they are versatile, reliable, and easy to work with. When in doubt, always go with the industry leader, even if it costs a bit more initially.

I hope this is helpful. There are many fixtures that suit various lighting styles, but these packages will allow you to make beautiful pictures. Perhaps other Forum readers can suggest additions and variations.

Good shooting!

Leo Ticheli

###


You can find Leo as a host in the Cow's Lighting Design forum




©2002 by Leo Ticheli and CreativeCow.net. All rights are reserved.



Click here to visit Creative COW's user forums and many other articles if you got here by a direct link to this page





Related Articles / Tutorials:
Lighting Design Pros
NAB 2012: Litepanels

NAB 2012: Litepanels

At NAB 2012, Litepanels part of Vitec Videocom, a Vitec Group company, introduced the Croma on-camera LED lighting fixture, the Inca Series tungsten balanced LED Fresnel fixtures, the Sola 4 Daylight Balanced LED Fresnel and the Sola ENG Flight Kit. The company also offered a $100 rebate on the purchases of the Croma variable color temperature LED light and the Sola EMG LED Fresnel lighting fixture.

Feature
Debra Kaufman
Lighting Design Pros
Litepanels SolaENG Review: On-Camera LED Light

Litepanels SolaENG Review: On-Camera LED Light

There are plenty of power-sipping LED lights that you can mount atop cameras, but very few have enough punch to fill up large spaces, or cut through daylight. Litepanels finally has such a light in the Sola ENG. It's powerful, controllable, and in some cases, a little loud.

Review
Helmut Kobler
Lighting Design Pros
Lighting with ShadowsLighting with Shadows

In this extended version of his article in the Creative Cow Visual Effects Issue, lighting expert and instructor Rick Wise draws on his decades of experience to illustrate how shadows can be the most important part of how a scene is lit. Learn how to control the direction and quality of your lighting design to add texture, dimension, and force to your images.

Feature
Rick Wise
Lighting Design Pros
Westward Ho!Westward Ho!

A wild ride of an edit: shot on film, projected onto five screens. In this Creative COW Magazine article Mike Sullivan discusses some of the problems such as lighting and color interaction he faced in a project he did for National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper, Wyoming.

People / Interview
Mike Sullivan
Lighting Design Pros
HandsOnHDV: How to Setup, Light & Shoot Great Looking Interviews

HandsOnHDV: How to Setup, Light & Shoot Great Looking Interviews

In this article, CreativeCOW.net contributing editor Jim Harvey takes a look at one of the newest titles from HandsOnHDV called How to Setup, Light & Shoot Great Looking Interviews and has determined that this is a 5 cow instructional DVD that you really can't be without.

Review
Jim Harvey
Lighting Design Pros
Shooting for Chromakeying

Shooting for Chromakeying

In addition to his tutorial on how to pull a usable matte from badly lit blue or green screens, Barend Onneweer has put together a list of things to consider when shooting for chromakeying.

Tutorial
Barend Onneweer
Recent Articles / Tutorials:
Letters to the COW Team
Creative COW's Brand New News Dept. Features and Functions

Creative COW's Brand New News Dept. Features and Functions

Creative COW's co-founders have been quietly at work cleaning up and rebuilding the Creative COW News section. While they've been at work, they've been adding new features and functions that will make the news department much more useful in the days ahead. If it's been a while since you've visited the news section, visit it soon but read this short introduction to what it is and how things are working. We hope these new changes make your research and keeping on top of industry news much more productive.

Editorial, Feature, Business
Ronald Lindeboom
Business & Marketing
12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish I'd Known at 25

12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish I'd Known at 25

12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish Id Known at 25 appeared in Creative COW Magazine and was one of our most popular articles. It is a true timeless classic in which COW leader, contributing editor, and Senior Business Adviser to Creative COW, Nick Griffin shares wisdom he's learned the hard way in over 30 years in business. His experience will help you to avoid mistakes, manage clients, and prepare yourself to achieve your greatest success.

Editorial, Feature, Business
Nick Griffin
RED Camera
Don Burgess aligns with Light Iron and Panavision for ALLIED

Don Burgess aligns with Light Iron and Panavision for ALLIED

Don Burgess, ASC trusts Light Iron. His last seven films can attest, so Burgess chose Light Iron to support him again with digital dailies and post finishing services on Allied. Directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard, the World War II-set film sees an intelligence officer's romance with a French Resistance fighter tested when high command thinks a double agent might be in play.


COW News
Autodesk Maya
ZERO FX: The Magic You Won't See In The Magnificent Seven

ZERO FX: The Magic You Won't See In The Magnificent Seven

ZERO FX takes Creative COW readers inside the invisible effects used to create the powerful vistas and settings used in The Magnificent Seven. But the real magic is in what you don't see.


Kayla Millhouse
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]