LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Sapphire Plug-ins Provide Big Help on ''Little Manhattan''

COW Library : Autodesk Combustion : Alan Edward Bell : Sapphire Plug-ins Provide Big Help on ''Little Manhattan''
CreativeCOW presents Sapphire Plug-ins Provide Big Help on ''Little Manhattan'' -- Autodesk Combustion People / Interview


Alan E. Bell at IMDb.com
Los Angeles California USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.




When you're ten years old, living in New York, and in love for the first time, the signs of your beloved seem like they're everywhere. You think you see her face in every store window, billboard, and movie-house marquee you pass. At least, that's the experience of Gabe, the principal character in 20th Century Fox and New Regency Pictures' romantic comedy, "Little Manhattan." Starring Josh Hutcherson as Gabe, and featuring Charlie Ray, Cynthia Nixon, and Bradley Whitford, the film opened in New York in September, with wider distribution later in 2005.

The task of creating Gabe's experience fell in part to editor Alan Edward Bell, who also handled the majority of visual effects on the film. One tool he came back to again and again was GenArts' Sapphire Plug-ins -- both during the editing stage to create effects within Final Cut Pro, and during the finishing stage to finalize the effects at film resolution within Autodesk combustion.

"This isn't a big visual effects picture, but there were many cases where I used Sapphire Plug-ins to save time and achieve a realistic result as opposed to creating effects that would stand out on their own," Bell explained. "Like most people probably do, I got them initially to solve a particular problem. I needed a quick way to generate a very high-quality, natural-looking de-focus effect." He downloaded the trial version of Sapphire, "threw on an effect to see how it would work," and after noting the quality and depth of the de-focus tool, purchased licenses for both his Mac-based editing system and Windows-based compositor.

The scene that prompted Bell to enlist Sapphire is a turning point in the film. In it, leading boy Gabe imagines visuals of his beloved are everywhere he looks in Manhattan. The filmmakers had shot one part of the scene on Broadway, with Gabe in the foreground and the famous Beacon Theater in the background, thinking they would spell out a message about Rosemary, the object of Gabe's affection, on the marquee. When the theater wouldn't allow them to change the signage, they composited in what they wanted during post production. Bell explained, "The shot rack focused from the kid's face to the sign, then back to the kid's face. The issue was that when we shot the clean plate with just the sign, it was shot sharp. We couldn't just rotoscope and replace the sign – the defocus would have looked fake. When a real shot goes out of focus, things don't just blur – the highlights bloom and dark elements blend and squeeze down. The Sapphire RackDefocus plug-in was perfect. It did more than just apply a blur and made it amazingly easy for me to match."

He noted, "That plug-in alone was worth the cost of the whole bundle to me. It saved me hours that I would have spent creating a complex matte from scratch. The fact that it integrated right into the Final Cut and combustion UI made it extremely fast and easy to use."

Another corrective fix that Sapphire simplified for Bell was in removing the interlaced look of NTSC footage that had been composited over shots of a clean TV screen. "The Sapphire de-interlacer plug-in, FieldRemove, looked fantastic. I could have worked with the standard interlace effects in either Final Cut Pro or combustion, but it would have taken me hours to get to the quality of the Sapphire effect."

While Bell had brought Sapphire into play initially for corrective use, he also applied it as a creative tool, using the BlurMotion effect to complete the look of a unique ‘postcard' approach he had developed. "There was one scene where Gabe was describing the 9-block radius where he's allowed to roam. It was just done in voiceover, and we had to find an interesting way to show it. We had a map and red line showing the area, but it wasn't enough. We came up with the idea of showing postcard vignettes of each of the key places. I went out one morning with a digital still camera and took pictures of each place, and got the idea of doing a stop-motion-like thing where we'd zoom from one place to the next. We took a picture, zoomed 25 feet, took the next, zoomed 25 more feet, around to all four places, and compiled the whole thing in Final Cut Pro. As the image turned each corner and we got closer to each place, we wanted to create a blurry tunnel-vision feel, and we judiciously added Sapphire's motion radial blur, BlurMotion, to help blend the shots together and generate a greater sense of speed. I roughed it out in Final Cut Pro, and used the same plug-in to re-master at film resolution in combustion. When I showed the director, he was completely wowed."

Bell also used Sapphire BlurMotion to create a ‘snap-zoom' look. "Some of the shots you see that zoom in from a wide angle to an extreme close-up weren't actually shot. We had the wide shot, and we had the close-up. We manufactured the zooms using Sapphire's BlurMotion. I just took the wide shot, blew it up to match the size of the close-up, reversed it, and added an extreme amount of blur on top so that it would appear we were zooming in super fast to a clean close-up."

For his work on "Little Manhattan," Alan Bell didn't come close to using all of the package's 175+ image-enhancing effects. "I probably just used about five of them," he said, "And I probably could have rolled my own and eventually gotten what I needed. But the time it would have taken wasn't worth it – especially when you have an effect that works exactly the way you want it to."

He added, "As a freelance editor, I now have a great package that I can use on other projects. Sapphire is great! It has the whole gamut – the standard stuff that you need and take for granted, and the really creative stuff that you can use if you want to do something crazy."


Click here for more information about GenArts and Sapphire Plug-Ins .


Click here to watch "Little Manhattan" trailer.



If you found this page from a direct link, please visit our forums or read other articles at CreativeCOW.net








Related Articles / Tutorials:
Autodesk Combustion
Writing a Logo with Light

Writing a Logo with Light
  Play Video
In this video tutorial, CreativeCOW leader Ayman Abdel-Basset demonstrates a quick, easy way to use the eraser of the paint operator and the particle system of Autodesk Combustion to create a nice writing logo effect -- complete with shining rays. This tutorial is for advanced users of Combustion, but also has some useful tips for new users.

Tutorial, Video Tutorial
Ayman Abdel-Basset
Autodesk Combustion
Combustion 4 Training Course

Combustion 4 Training Course

Michael Hurwicz looks at Kenneth LaRue's combustion 4 training DVDs and concludes that this set is great for novices and intermediates alike, but if you're already an expert, you may only need the 'What's New in Combustion 4' set that's available.

Review
Michael Hurwicz
Autodesk Combustion
Creating the Old Movie look with Combustion - Dirt and Scratches

Creating the Old Movie look with Combustion - Dirt and Scratches

In this tutorial, CreativeCOW.net Contributing Editor, Bimo Adi Prakoso introduces further techniques for Creating the Old Movie Look with Combustion. Read on to continue this tutorial with Part 2: Creating Scratches and Dirt.

Tutorial
Bimo Adi Prakoso
Autodesk Combustion
The Blonde with One Green Screen

The Blonde with One Green Screen

The following technique from CreativeCOW member Todd Groves can be applied to situations where the actor or object that is placed before a greenscreen/bluescreen has some element about them that cannot be separated by the standard approach to keying. The situation that inspired this solution involved a blonde haired actress in front of a greenscreen.''

Tutorial
Todd Groves
Autodesk Combustion
Using the Diamond Keyer of Combustion 4 to change a selected color

Using the Diamond Keyer of Combustion 4 to change a selected color

In this tutorial, Ayman Abdel-Basset demonstrates how to use the new Diamond Keyer of Autodesk Combustion 4 along with the Color Correction operator to change the selected color of the footage.

Tutorial
Ayman Abdel-Basset
Autodesk Combustion
Runaway Training:Combustion Underground Training DVDs

Runaway Training:Combustion Underground Training DVDs

In this article, CreativeCOW.net contributing editor Jim Harvey reviews Combustion Underground Training DVDs by Lee 'Rod' Roderick from Runaway Training. Read the review to find out why Jim gave this training 5 COWs.

Review
Jim Harvey
Autodesk Combustion
Creating the Old Movie look with Combustion

Creating the Old Movie look with Combustion

Contributing Editor, Bimo Adi Prakoso demonstrates some techniques for Creating the Old Movie Looks with Combustion in this tutorial. He adivises readers that, ''Many plugins for creating an old movie look are available at various costs, but the challenge is creating one without any plugin at all. Actually, it's a simple, straight forward process''.

Tutorial
Bimo Adi Prakoso
Autodesk Combustion
Combustion 4, a first look by Ken LaRue

Combustion 4, a first look by Ken LaRue

Creative Cow's Ken LaRue explores the just announced Discreet combustion 4. Packed with many new features that Ken enthusiastically describes as ''Hot!'' and which include quite a number that many users have had on their own personal wish lists, C4 is drawing a lot of attention and discussion here in the Creative Cow forums. In this article, Ken helps us explore many of the reasons why...

Review
Ken LaRue
Autodesk Combustion
Creating a Promo Transition with Combustion

Creating a Promo Transition with Combustion

As the lines between television and the internet continue to blur, it seems like every TV channel wants you to look at their website. Whether you're CNN or community television, you'll have to rise above the straight cut or dissolve to get the viewer's attention.In this tutorial, Lee 'Rod' Roderick will show you how to use Discreet combustion to create a promo transition that combines digital video and motion graphics. Once you set it up, you can substitute your own clips and text.

Tutorial
Lee Roderick
3D Transitions in discreet combustion: part 23D Transitions in discreet combustion: part 2

Purpose: To build a transition that helps to instruct the use of the 3d workspace, and how to put it to use in a production piece. This is part 2 of a two-part tutorial.

Tutorial
Ben Munkres
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]