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The Future of Editing

CreativeCOW presents The Future of Editing -- NAB Expo Feature


Biscardi Creative Media
Buford Georgia USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


Tuesday was a whirlwind day. Started off early at a breakfast meeting with the top level executives of Avid and ended with the always entertaining Supermeet. Ok, maybe this year's Supermeet was a little more entertaining than most.

Let's start with the morning. For the first time I can truly say that "Avid is listening." I've seen the moniker on their site in the past and I kind of laughed. I mean this is Avid we're talking about. The company that tells us how we can purchase their software and hardware and if we don't like it we can go somewhere else.

Ok, maybe that's how they used to do things, but it was clear from our meeting today, Avid is truly changing the way they do business. It seems to have taken a while for it to really sink in but there is a definite shift in the tone coming from the company. There is a real willingness now to open up the software to third party hardware as we have seen from last year's Matrox reveal to this year's AJA Io Express.

First off, it was impressive to me that not only was I meeting with their PR folks, but the CEO and many of the top management and marketing team. One on one for about 90 minutes and I was free to ask any question. Generally I'm used to having many layers of separation between me and the head of the company that makes my NLE. Of course being a Final Cut Pro guy with a bunch of AJA Kona cards, my primary interest is seeing Avid continue their migration to open up the software to even more hardware options not only from AJA and Matrox, but Blackmagic Design as well. Obviously Avid would not answer me directly on any of the hardware questions, but I get the sense that their migration towards openness will continue at some point in the future.

Then there was Apple and the SuperMeet presentation. As expected, the new Final Cut Pro appears to have been built on the foundation of iMovie. But there's nothing wrong with that, the interface is actually very efficient. You will have to re-think your way of operating, but there's nothing wrong with taking the iMovie base and building upon that.

What Apple actually chose to show was quite nice. Background rendering, Magnetic timeline with the audio always moving out of the way, and "open" timeline with no hard tracks that appear and disappear as needed, pitch corrected audio skimming, improved color correction, Audio fade controls much better, simple retiming in the timeline, color matching with single click and of course, no more transcoding / mixing and matching of formats in the timeline. These are all the super cool, wiz bang features that are the hallmark of any Apple marketing event.

The two highlights for me were Audition and the Magnetic audio. Audition allows us to essentially create a floating bin of multiple clips to insert into the timeline and with simple keystroke try out each shot in the timeline.

But Apple was presenting to 1500 video editors, many of whom look past the slick marketing demo and want to know about how it works under the hood and with all the rest of the pro apps that we all use every day. That's probably why with each new item presented, about half of the room was very excited and the other half was quiet. The only uniform applause throughout the room seemed to be for the price, which garnered about half a standing ovation from the room. So now it's just $299 for Final Cut Pro only and there was no mention of the rest of the suite period. I guess part of the marketing strategy is "well it's so cheap now nobody can complain."

The big question among the pro editors I spoke to after the presentation was what didn't we see?

Multi format, multi frame rate, multi codec playback. We were told it's now supported, but it was not shown, at least not that I could tell.

Tape Capture / Layback. Is this still supported internally to the application or has Apple taken the stand that they do not need to support a videotape workflow at all internally? Not only is tape still being shot by many production companies, there are millions of hours of videotape archive material that has to be ingested for projects, such as the feature documentaries we cut today.

In fact what about the capture cards / boxes from AJA, Blackmagic and Matrox? No mention of or appearance from them.

Filters. Do filters still work in the new FCP? As in our old filters that all of us already own and any potential new third party filters for the new FCP X? How will FCP interpolate and handle archive projects that include filters?

Titling. What does the new font tool look like? In the presentation a lower third was shown but it was never explained how it was created.

OMF / XML / EDL Export / Import. Can we still use XML to move projects to After Effects and other platforms as needed for finishing and other work? How easy is it to move the projects around?

Alpha channel / composting modes. How do these work in the new FCP? Some very nice looking effects were shown in the demo but were they created in FCP or elsewhere? Don't know.

Large project management. How will FCP hold up under a large project such as the documentaries we currently cut. My feeling is that the new FCP is well suited for shorter projects but not long form, it seems like it would simply break if you threw a feature film or documentary at it. Can't imagine scrolling through 200 hours of filmstrips to find my shots. With some of the organizational tools it might be manageable but hard to tell.

What we were presented definitely felt like a 1.0 release and Apple certainly set that bar throughout the event by comparing the launch of X to FCP 1.0. The original changed the face of NLE editing forever and they believe X will do the same thing. It certainly does with the interface and the price. Apple will absolutely build more market share for the product because at $299 every single hobbyist, school, and anyone who wants to edit video will purchase the product. That very well seems their goal with the price.

How those numbers will translate into pro editors, television series, feature films, etc remains to be seen. Would have been nice to hear from Walter Murch or the Coen Brothers last night to get their thoughts on how X will improve their workflows on feature films. The reaction among the pro editors and others I chatted with after the show was tepid at best. I think an encounter by one of the folks was somewhat telling.

Editor: Nice presentation but what about those features that weren't shown? What about capture cards, filters and how it might perform with bigger projects.

Other person: This Final Cut Pro isn't designed for you.

Maybe that's what Apple is banking on. So many new folks coming into the industry who don't know about or need capture cards. That's who the new Final Cut Pro X is designed for. Those who will never have to retrieve an archive tape, handle more than a few hours or material at a time or interface with other applications outside the Apple brand. So Apple will "win" the NLE battle simply by sheer numbers of installed users. As they pointed out in the presentation, based on installed user numbers alone, Avid and Adobe are "fighting" for second place.

It's impossible to give a true assessment of how good / bad the new FCP X really is since this is the only time any of us will see it. Unlike those "fighting for second place" Apple is not on the show floor so we cannot ask any questions or test out the interface for ourselves. Only those very few select beta testers know for sure what is and is not included in the interface.

The potential is there for the application to be a reinvention of non linear editing. But a one hour presentation left me and many other pro editors scratching our heads with many more questions than answers. Apple went for the slick, we want to know the down and dirty. At least we can go out on the show floor today and talk to those "other two companies" who are fighting for second place and actually address workflow questions.

So what's my verdict? Apple went "All In" on this one event and came out swinging with a patented, marketing presentation full of slick features. I think they hit a double. Nice hit, but not near enough power to bring it all the way home. The biggest beneficiaries of the one hour presentation will most likely turn out to be Avid and Adobe. Sure Apple will sell millions of copies of X, but those other two A's my very well come out ahead.

 


 

Walter Biscardi, Creative COW Magazine

Walter Biscardi
Buford, Georgia USA


Walter has been a Professional Video Editor, Producer, and Director since 1990. His credits include multiple Emmys®, Peabodys, Tellys, and Aurora Awards. Walter is the Owner / Operator of Biscardi Creative Media, a full service video and film production company in Atlanta, GA. The show you know him best for is "Good Eats" on the Food Network. He is currently in development of two original television series and is the Co-Producer of the feature documentary "Foul Water, Fiery Serpent", narrated by Sigourney Weaver.

EMMY® is the trademark property of ATAS/NATAS.







Comments

Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Richard Herd
I needed recently to make a purchase. I bought a $500 windows 7 laptop and downloaded lightworks.
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Brendan Maghran
Thank you for the detailed post, very helpful for those of us who could not come see the unveiling.

-Brendan
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Rob Grauert
Were you able to see if it was a single-window interface (like Motion)? I'd hate that.

And did they mention anything about the Browser window (if thats still what it's called)? I don't know if I'm liking that film-strip view. I prefer the list view. I hope you can still do list view.

And that feature about adding keywords to a portion of a clip - doesn't necessarily seem better than adding markers to a clip and adding a note to the marker. At least you can read that in list view. If an amateur doesn't bother doing that now, why would they take the time to do it with this new keyword feature?

It was a nice presentation, but it hasn't stopped me from considering a purchase of Avid 5.0

Rob Grauert, Jr.
http://www.robgrauert.com
command-r.tumblr.com
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Mark Suszko
I got to see a better vimeo clip of the demo today and I think I Get It. Personally, I under-utilized the second window in my personal editing style, I tend to throw everything down into the timeline to work on, and the demo looked like the way I work now, kinda. I also found echoes of my user experience with Discreet Edit 6, which was pleasant. It looks like a modal interface where everything you don't immediately need for a particular task stays hidden, the same way the icons in the apple desktop dock appear and disappear at will.

One thing FCP has always got right is, there is more than one, sometimes more than three ways to do any particular thing you need to do. One of them is bound to be the way you like to do it. It is currently about as friendly to keyboard-centric users as it is to mouse-pushers, and anything in-between like me, and that's good. I can't imagine Apple threw out that concept for x. And careful listening to the spiel will confirm that you'll have all the keyboard shortcuts you want, that there can be a second monitor, and a few other things people are already wailing about.

The stakes of this show were astronomically high, so, you are the Apple demonstrator: you are not going to demonstrate any aspect that is not yet 100 percent bulletproof. This thing is still a work in progress. The parts that work, that I've seen so far, I know are going to help my particular needs quite a bit. And for that price I'm willing to take a flyer on it. They didn't address all my questions and needs that night either. But they proved that they haven't been making vaporware the last two years. This is significant, whatever it is. It may be a double, but it's for sure they are still in the game at this point. Now we have to find out what inning.


Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Les Kaye
[Mark Suszko] "I got to see a better vimeo clip of the demo today "

Care to post a link?

http://www.leskaye.net
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by samir kassab
I've seen a 2 part video on fcp.co,it was pretty decent
http://fcp.co/final-cut-pro/news/333-fcp-x-presentation-the-bootleg-experie...
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Jason Porthouse
Interesting take on it Walter. I'm surprised by your assumption that X won't handle a large project - the thought that Apple seems to have given to metada seems to contradict that to me. We're moving into a world where metadata is all important, and they seem to have nailed a lot of the issues.

As to cutting 200 hours of material - hell, I'd love to have filmstrip view of clips on the docs I've worked on!! How many hours spent shuttling through material to find shots - I think this will speed stiff up immesurably. Couple this with keywording and the way this will let you organise material I can see this being a real boon for docs.

From what I've seen this will potentially be a real sea-change in the way we tell stories. I'd be happy to see third-party tools for tape ingest (especially if it can run in the background) and even output, though I think omission of this unlikely.

But all this is conjecture - roll on June is my feeling!

Jason

_________________________________

Before you criticise a man, walk a mile in his shoes.
Then when you do criticise him, you'll be a mile away. And have his shoes.

*the artist formally known as Jaymags*
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by rene hazekamp
I don't wanna spoil any remarks, but in Motion you can actually build your own double/triple- window interface and save and manage it.

So I don't know what's the problem if final cut X has the same approach,

Actually it would have been quite strange if the Supermeet had opened with the news that final cut X can export cmx 3400 edls AND has a multiformat magnetic time lime. And then another marketing guy pledging they would always support Grass Valley edl's as well.
wouldn't make much sense, wouldn't it ?


René A. Hazekamp

portfolio http://www.renehazekamp.com

Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by walter biscardi
[rene hazekamp] "Actually it would have been quite strange if the Supermeet had opened with the news that final cut X can export cmx 3400 edls AND has a multiformat magnetic time lime. And then another marketing guy pledging they would always support Grass Valley edl's as well.
wouldn't make much sense, wouldn't it ?"


It would make total sense to mention it at some point during the presentation or in some sort of a press release after the presentation. Final Cut Pro X still supports XML / OMF / EDL Export Import for example.

As for the multiformat timeline, they told us it supports it but never actually showed that one which was surprising for me. They pretty much showed everything else they mentioned, but did not put together a multi-format timeline.

As I mentioned in a previous blog on my website, in the Avid booth I watched a demo where the artist started a 1080 / 59.94 timeline.

Into that timeline he placed:
1080i / 59.94
720p / 50
720p / 60
1080p / 23.96
and a few others.

The codecs were
DVCPro HD
HDV
XDCAM

Then he hit Play and the timeline just played. Not only that, he had complete control of the interlace interpolation of the all the clips, meaning he could adjust the look of the 720/50 and 1080p / 23.96 footage to play more smoothly in that timeline. All in realtime. And not only a single track, but a multi-track timeline. This was all playing through an AJA Io Express.

That's the type of multi-format capabilities I'm looking for and now with the Baselight plug-in, I would not have to worry about if a completely mixed up timeline like that would be supported by Color or Resolve, I can stay right in FCP. I'm waiting to see if the multi-format capabilities for FCP X are really real this time as this would be a HUGE timesaver for our documentaries.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

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Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Chris Borjis
[walter biscardi] "As for the multiformat timeline, they told us it supports it but never actually showed that one which was surprising for me."

One of the screen shots from the presentation showed h.264 and prores clips mixed in.

I guess you mean you didn't actually see it playing that content.

Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Steven Gladstone
Look we know the cycle, somebody jumps ahead here, everyone catches up and then they jump ahead somewhere else. Really - Sliding clips doesn't cause clips to collide and they drop to another track. For me that is a "Duh" but not for the NLE designers. The old SD editor I used to use (DPS velocity) had that happen and all the users applauded - not because it was new, but because we finally had it. Oh that was something like 7 or 8 years ago. On the PC side, IVS edits plays most everything without rendering I believe (mixing sources on the timeline.) Didn't Autodesk have that what a decade ago on Smoke? yes, but now it is affordable to all of us Joes.

Me, I like having AB tracks with a transition track. Makes cross fades sooooo simple for me. I don't think FCP has it, and I've learned not to need it anyway. I think the applause were for features that we've wanted and now we have. The leaps forward - those are interesting, but only time will tell how much a forward leap they are. I'd be happy for a locking collar on the Thunderbolt connector.

Steven Gladstone
http://www.gladstonefilms.com
@rene hazekamp
by Rob Grauert
"I don't wanna spoil any remarks, but in Motion you can actually build your own double/triple- window interface and save and manage it."

Wow, you're right! You just rip the tabs off the pane. I can't believe I didn't notice that. Ugh, I feel like a dummy

Rob Grauert, Jr.
http://www.robgrauert.com
command-r.tumblr.com
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by walter biscardi
[Rob Grauert] " Were you able to see if it was a single-window interface (like Motion)? I'd hate that."

Yes, that's what they showed, though then a report came out after the presentation that you could set the interface up with a Viewer / Canvas and perform 3 point editing if you choose. I don't know, they didn't show that.



[Rob Grauert] "And did they mention anything about the Browser window (if thats still what it's called)? I don't know if I'm liking that film-strip view. I prefer the list view. I hope you can still do list view."

There is still essentially a browser. Open up iMovie on your machine to see what it looks like. It's essentially the same. In fact, as pointed out in another thread, play with iMovie 11 to preview the new FCP since it already has some of the features that were presented to us last Tuesday.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

Blog Twitter Facebook
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Shawn Larkin
Great thread so far. I read Walter's article on his blog first and now here again. My feelings reading this and other Pro responses have to do with the open vs. closed mindset of "Mature" Pro Editors.

Apple was clear that this was a sneak peek. Larry Jordan did a fine job reiterating this in his coverage so far. Surely, Apple will HAVE TO address all the backwards compatibility and interoperability concerns Pro Editors have with FCP X.

When you step back and look at the big picture here, you see can see the thinking involved with this product at the demo stage: they are trying to simplify and clean up how to edit. There is a bit of a paradigm shift with all the reliance on metadata, and the single viewer, and the "trackless" magnetic timeline, which poses massive concerns for those that know how to "get around" and are comfortable with what they already know.

But no one -- NO ONE ON THIS FORUM ANYWAY -- has experience learning this version and using it and getting the best out of it yet. All the hoopla about "will it support X or Y because we have invested in hardware or need a solution for whatever..." is immediate, but misses the point of the demo: to show Pro Editors a new / better way to edit with a shift in habits. This will take some getting used to. And surely all the concern is rightfully part of all the money and time spent investing in previous gear and habits.

But change is not always easy. It's almost like listening to those Avid Editors which never wanted to try FCP. Or try telling a die hard AE guy that his composite is easer with a node-based solution, like Nuke.

So what if the software looks pretty and clean and "iMovie-ish?" At the end of the day, if Editor A can use FCP X more fluidly with a shorter learning curve and get more power out of it than Editor B can form his older editing software, then who cares what it looks like? And if you are upset about how cheap it is and that it narrows the gap between Pro and Consumer, well, you're right. The argument about the artist using the tool to create and that access does not equate to good work still stands.

Everything seems very speculative to me and without using this tool no one knows if it works or doesn't.

Even if Apple forces everyone using FCP X to abandon current gear -- WHICH I DOUBT THEY WILL DO -- to use this system, it might be for the better in the long run. Backwards support sure seems to hinder other platforms and systems. I mean, look at Microsoft Windows for example :)

Ultimately, I'm sure FCP7 and all of FCS3 will be used transitionally as people learn how to use FCP X. And all this much ado about nothing will be an afterthought.

Or not.
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Acmade
The reliance on metadata and the single viewer hardly constitute a paradigm shift. In fact, the metadata features of FCP X remind me of Lightworks, and Avid has always had a very solid media database. "Classic" FCP is incredibly weak in this area, and I bet a lot of "mature" pro editors welcome these improvements in FCP X.

I am much more concerned about other things, e.g. trimming, OMF/AAF export and keyboard support to name a few.
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Scott Sheriff
"My feelings reading this and other Pro responses have to do with the open vs. closed mindset of "Mature" Pro Editors."

Are you implying that anyone that has a different/skeptical opinion on this is closed minded and immature?
How close-minded is it to automatically assume the new=better?
How closed minded is it to gush on and on about how great a product is that has only been shown in a limited demo?
History is on the side of the skeptic.
The list of things designers and engineers thought were 'better', 'innovative', or the ever trendy 'paradigm shift' that turned out to be total failures is a lot bigger, than the list of successes.
There is no doubt that failure paves the road to success, and it is the way to advance, but it is not automatic. This is something you will learn as you 'mature'.

"...but misses the point of the demo: to show Pro Editors a new / better way to edit with a shift in habits."

This is completely subjective. At best.
I don't recall asking Apple to show me a better way to edit. I've been editing slightly longer than Apple has been in business, and I know what works best for me.
In fact I don't remember anyone else asking that either. If you can find a post in the FCP forum since the release of 6.0 where the person was looking for "a better way to edit" in this context, I 'd like to see it. There are however, a lot of posts asking for improvements to the software and advertised features to actually work.

"But change is not always easy. It's almost like listening to those Avid Editors which never wanted to try FCP. Or try telling a die hard AE guy that his composite is easer(sic) with a node-based solution, like Nuke."

Change, for the sake of change is unproductive. Unless you're an interior decorator. For change to make sense in a business (that is what editing is) several things have to happen. It has to produce a clear and definable improvement. It has to make financial sense. It has to cause no unwanted consequences, or side effects.
So far, none of these questions can be answered. So those who are currently resistant to change, are probably right.

You know what is worse than "listening to those Avid Editors which never wanted to try FCP"? It's listening to pretentious know-it-all's trying to push their hobby/brand/music/religion on others that didn't ask for it.
I'm sure the Avid guys are tired of unsolicited opinions from FCP fanboys.
So "try telling a die hard AE guy that his composite is easer(sic) with a node-based solution," is a good example of that.
Nodes are great. DVDSP and Color are a couple of good examples of where they work well, but I prefer the viewer/canvas/timeline for editing. If you like node better, bully for you. Your love of nodes doesn't make you a better than anyone else.
And if the AE guy doesn't see things your way, so what? Unless you're getting paid as a consultant I'm guessing the AE guy doesn't really care what you think. He is happy with what he has. It also doesn't make him a Luddite. Maybe he is just immune to 'group think'.

"So what if the software looks pretty and clean and "iMovie-ish?" At the end of the day, if Editor A can use FCP X more fluidly with a shorter learning curve and get more power out of it than Editor B can form his older editing software, then who cares what it looks like?"

This is an interesting reversal of attitude to reinforce your point. So on one hand you're ragging on the Avid and AE guys for liking what they have, and not caring about what others think about it. And then when people are doing the same thing and harshing on the iMovie like UI of X, you revert to the Avid and AE guys attitude of if it works for me what do you care?
This reminds me of another typical double standard seen on these forums. How about all those that make cracks about us 'mature', 'old timers' not liking change, to make some group think point, and then evoking Murch's in the next breath to make some other point.

"Everything seems very speculative to me and without using this tool no one knows if it works or doesn't."

This is the only thing in your post that I didn't find insulting or condescending, and can agree with.

"Even if Apple forces everyone using FCP X to abandon current gear -- WHICH I DOUBT THEY WILL DO..."

Yeah, Apple would never do that, or abandon a group of loyal users...

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Shawn Larkin
Thanks for the reply Scott. I'm glad someone had something to say to me regarding that post.

For the record:

I use Avid, Premiere Pro, AE, FCP, Motion and any other tool I need in a given situation or environment. I'm not really a "fanboy" of what Apple makes. I just like well designed solutions that make things easier.

Basically, I look at things from "does it work or not" perspective. Apple is in a unique position to survey the NLE landscape from 10 years of experience and feedback and to create what they think answers a lot of problems with editing.

I "got" this from watching the demo. The way you navigate the timeline and media and, well, edit seemed like a paradigm shift to me and if felt like these smart architects were really trying to re-think editing from the basics on forward. This, of course, is my opinion. But it felt very "new" to me. And I've been making my living at this for over 10 years -- started on Media 100, then Avid, then FCP, then PP, blah, blah, blah...

Hence, no one knows if this is going to work or not. Not yet.

And yet there is a very closed mind to this before actually testing it for an extended period of time.

So it goes...
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Scott Sheriff
[Shawn Larkin] "Thanks for the reply Scott. I'm glad someone had something to say to me regarding that post.

For the record:

I use Avid, Premiere Pro, AE, FCP, Motion and any other tool I need in a given situation or environment. I'm not really a "fanboy" of what Apple makes. I just like well designed solutions that make things easier.

Basically, I look at things from "does it work or not" perspective. Apple is in a unique position to survey the NLE landscape from 10 years of experience and feedback and to create what they think answers a lot of problems with editing.

I "got" this from watching the demo. The way you navigate the timeline and media and, well, edit seemed like a paradigm shift to me and if felt like these smart architects were really trying to re-think editing from the basics on forward. This, of course, is my opinion. But it felt very "new" to me. And I've been making my living at this for over 10 years -- started on Media 100, then Avid, then FCP, then PP, blah, blah, blah...

Hence, no one knows if this is going to work or not. Not yet.

And yet there is a very closed mind to this before actually testing it for an extended period of time.

So it goes..."


Fair enough.
I was using you're post as a springboard to comment on several similar type posts along this theme. And while quoting you, I was speaking in a more general sense, which is not clear in my post. I should have said that up front.

"And yet there is a very closed mind to this before actually testing it for an extended period of time."

I can justify this, and it is not about having an open or closed mind.
So if you have been around for a while, you know how much work goes into a proper upgrade. Factor in the install and the learning time, the cost, the risk to system stability, and the unknown of will my current devices/drivers/plugins/projects work with the new version and for some of us, there has to be compelling reasons to try something new. As a one seat shop, I have no interest in risking my system just to be an unpaid Apple R&D guy, or learning new software just for the sake of. If I'm not seeing any benefits to myself, that outweighs any of the potential downsides, I would rather spend that time/money shooting and editing. And with Lightworks for Mac coming out this fall, if I really want to try something new, I can do that for free.
There may be folks out there that see real upsides to the new version, or just love to tweak on new stuff as much as they like to edit. Great. Have at it, and take one for the team.

Scott Sheriff
Director
http://www.sstdigitalmedia.com

I have a system, it has stuff in it, and stuff hooked to it. I have a camera, it can record stuff. I read the manuals, and know how to use this stuff and lots of other stuff too.
You should be suitably impressed...
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by samir kassab
Thank u for this detailed article Walter

During these past 2 days we have read all kind of comments and comparisons and assumptions and filling in the blanks!some say fcp X is an Imovie pro,other say it has a Smoke look others say it's a Sony Vegas imitation,etc...some say Apple abandoned the pros,others are sad cuz it's too cheap,some others are just too lazy to learn and wants a "faster horse"...

As I see it ,Apple people got exactly what They intended from the demo!they made a huge buzz about their new product,editing forums are crowded with comments about the new flashy features,and they got the marketing ball rolling!... I wonder why none of this happens when adobe or avid has new product!that's what apple people does,that's what they excell at!

I frankly don't see what's wrong if apple is able to deliver a brand new product that appeals to prosumers and still be able to fulfill Pros expectation!who said pro stuff should be ugly and complicated or else it's labeled as consumer application!as long as fcp is up to the job I don't care if it looks like "windows movie maker"

After all ,we are gonna wait until June , download the new X , we will love it ,and a year later we will be nagging why the magnetic timeline only works only on audio and not on video as well!
Re: Blog: The "Future of Editing."
by Chris Tompkins
Thanks Walter.

Chris Tompkins
Video Atlanta LLC


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Grass Valley: Combining Heritage with R&D

Grass Valley: Combining Heritage with R&D

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Debra Kaufman reveals that while Grass Valley has had its share of ups and downs, the message at NAB 2011 was: we're here, we're still relevant and we've got a lot of new products to prove it.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
FilmLight makes strategic moves at NAB 2011

FilmLight makes strategic moves at NAB 2011

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. The simple story is that NAB is about showcasing new products. But the meta-story is that NAB is about strategy, branding and positioning. That’s what was on Debra Kaufman's mind when she saw the very interesting one-two punch of new products at the FilmLight suite at the Renaissance Hotel.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
Chyron is in the Cloud

Chyron is in the Cloud

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Debra Kaufman finds Chyron to be another NAB stalwart with NAB showing just how far the company has traveled since the days of analog and hardware by supporting Cloud technology and also showcasing enhancements to its HyperX3, LEX3, and MicroX on-air graphics systems.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
AJA@NAB

AJA@NAB

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, we find that Gary Adcock spent quite a bit of time at NAB working in the AJA booth, which showcased the KiPro Mini software update v.2.5, update for the Kona 3G card, new fibre converters and the FS2 frame sync.

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Gary Adcock
NAB Expo
EditShare at NAB 2011: Collaboration is the keyword

EditShare at NAB 2011: Collaboration is the keyword

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Debra Kaufman finds that providing options for multiple workflows--not dictating how to work--is EditShare's jumping-off point. Read for more on EditShare's newest players in the collaborative game as they showcased for NAB enhanced production workflow applications and tiered storage line up.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
Blackmagic Design releases free version of DaVinci Resolve

Blackmagic Design releases free version of DaVinci Resolve

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Debra Kaufman swoons over Blackmagic Design's slew of technology and news from NAB, including the release of UltraStudio 3D with Thunderbolt Technology, a new range of ATEM Production Switchers, ATEM Television Studio, and DaVinci Resolve upgrades.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
3ality Digital shifts the 3D equation

3ality Digital shifts the 3D equation

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Debra Kaufman highlights for the COW@NAB series: new tools bring costs day, efficiencies up for 3ality Digital with IntelleMatte, an S3D graphics application, also IntelleMotion, IntelleCam, and IntelleCal.

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Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
Inexpensive archiving for tapeless media

Inexpensive archiving for tapeless media

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, blogged from NAB 2011, Shane Ross had a mission, which was to search for a reasonably priced archiving solution of tapeless media that all of us not-so-big production and post production people could afford. Look now at Prime CACHE-A and Pro CACHE-A, BRU by the Tolis Group, and Edit Bay Production Desktop with this talented editor.

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Shane Ross
NAB Expo
FilmLight Baselight for FCP. It's a serious color tool.

FilmLight Baselight for FCP. It's a serious color tool.

Thousands of members of Creative COW were at the 2011 NAB Show, and we are pleased to bring you some of their reports. In this entry, Walter Biscardi at NAB 2011, had the opportunity for a 1 on 1 demo of the full Baselight color correction system and it's "little cousin", the plug-in that "allows you to bring a ridiculously powerful color correction system directly inside of Final Cut Pro" (and other hosts).

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Walter Biscardi
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