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ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero

CreativeCOW presents ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero -- What Computer Should I Buy? Review


Biscardi Creative Media
Buford Georgia USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


ProMAX has put together a beast of a creative workstation designed to serve a host of needs in production, particularly Post, and Walter Biscardi put the beast to a grueling test.






The big difference between the Apple Mac Desktop world and the the PC Windows Desktop world is flexibility. With Apple, you get what they give you with the Mac Pro. Sure, you can make some modifications, but there's no real control over the specifications of the machine. On the PC side -- as has been the case for years -- anyone can build a computer from scratch making a workstation be what you want it to be to serve your needs. For years, Gamers have lead the way in custom, tricked out PC towers. Now ProMAX has put together a beast of a creative workstation designed to serve a host of needs in production -- particularly Post.


THE CONFIGURATION
When you look at the machine from the front, the design cues from an Apple Mac Pro are obvious. But the similarities end there. Here's how this unit I'm testing is configured:

ProMAX ONE Hero
  • Intel Sandy Bridge Motherboard
  • (2) Intel E5-2687W Xeon 3.10 GHz - 16 Cores - 40MB Cache
  • 32 GB RAM
  • Internal 12x Blu-Ray Burner
  • NVIDIA Quadra 6000
  • 18TB Internal RAID
  • AJA Kona LHi
  • Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64Bit

The first thing that jumped out at me was the 16 Cores. That's a lot of CPU power right off the bat, and it surpasses anything on the Apple side at this time. And while this particular unit is configured with 32GB of RAM, it has 16 memory slots allowing you up to 128GB of RAM. That's a boatload of RAM allowing you to multi-task to your heart's content.

The next thing that might jump out at you as a typo is the 18TB Internal RAID. That's not a mistake. Opening the front door reveals a six bay RAID built right into the front of the machine.





My test model was configured in RAID 5, giving me 15TB of available space to work with. Since it's internal, with no external cables or connections, you would expect it to be fast... Um. Yes, and then some.





I don't know about you, but 1100MB/s Write and 1300MB/s Read is about as fast a RAID as I've ever tested... and again, it's just 6 drives in RAID 5. Suffice it to say, these speeds should support just about any format you choose to throw at the machine.

There are six PCI slots (four are x16 lane), so you have plenty of room to build this machine up with whatever internal cards you want. ProMAX put the NVIDIA Quadro 6000 in this unit and I could add a few more to create a realtime Resolve box, for example. There are also multiple panels on the front allowing for various configurations for BluRay / DVD Burners, CF and SD card readers and the like, along with both USB 3.0 and USB 2.0 slots. In the back, you have four USB slots, along with my favorite: dual Ethernet ports. This plays very well with our Small Tree Ethernet SAN, allowing us to use one port for the SAN and one port for Internet connectivity.

There are four boot drives in this unit, and you might wonder why this might be an advantage, since this is a Windows box. Well, it's no secret that some software runs better when it's by itself and not co-installed with other applications. So you could have a boot drive for Adobe Creative Suite, one for Avid, one for Resolve, for example. You can also use the various boot drives for testing new OS or software configurations before you commit to production. On our Mac Pros for example, we have multiple boot drives for the various Mac OS.

If you plan to keep this machine in your edit suite, you need to know two things about it. One, the machine is very quiet, particularly considering there's a RAID in the front of it. Not silent by any means, but definitely a machine you can work with in the room and not be distracted by high speed fans. Two, the machine puts out a fair amount of heat out the back similar to a Mac Pro. It noticeably warmed up my office that I was testing the machine in which is approx. 15 x 13 with 7.5' ceilings. So I would recommend a small fan be put behind the machine to help dissipate the heat and definitely keep some air gap between the back and a wall.

In other words, this machine is very well designed for the flexibility that creative professionals need today and for the foreseeable future.

SOME CAVEATS
Now going back to the internal RAID, this comes with some caveats. The ProMAX One is longer than most computers, a full 23" front to back compared to 18" for a Mac Pro. In my facility, all of our desktops are on racks in the machine room and the ONE is 4" longer than that our 19" racks. Doesn't sound like a lot, but with the placement of the feet, the machine just barely sits on the rack shelf. Those six drives also make the machine very heavy. Without any additional items, the ONE is 45 lbs according to ProMAX. I don't have a scale to weigh the machine but according to the UPS label on the outside of the ONE box, this configuration comes in around 80 pounds. When moving it around, we made sure to have two people lift on it.

One concern for me is that if you have an issue with the computer or the RAID, that affects both components. Computer has to be serviced, you lose access to the RAID and all the data on it. RAID has to be serviced, you lose access to the computer. An internal RAID is not unique to the ONE and potential technical service is just one thing to consider with any workstation with an on-board RAID unit.

A minor thing, but something I find quite annoying is the placement of the power switch behind the front panel, which has a key lock.








According to ProMAX's website the locking front panel is there to protect your sensitive data and I can certainly see its use in some facilities or locations. But I don't see the need for the power switch to be locked up and if I leave the front door unlocked, I have to leave the keys hanging in the door. As someone who has had locking keys misplaced in a facility in the past, I would hate to be unable to start my computer because the key is missing. Again, a minor thing, but I wanted to point it out.

While a FW400 port is standard on the front of the machine, there are no FW800 ports. These can be easily added through a PCI card, but it would have been nice to have both standard with so many FW800 supported hard drives out in the field.

One other thing is the Bella Pro Series keyboard. We've gotten so used the flat and very quiet Apple keyboards, these "older style" keyboards are just loud and obnoxious to us. So I would replace the keyboard immediately with an Apple keyboard because that's what we're used to. But if you like the older style, standard keyboards, you'll love the Bella Pro keyboard. It's a personal preference.

And finally, as with any Windows workstation, you absolutely cannot output to ProRes from this machine as there is no way to encode to ProRes on a Windows workstation. The workaround to this is to invest in something like an AJA KiPro or a BlackMagic Design Hyperdeck Shuttle which can record ProRes files from your video output.


HOW ABOUT THE STREAMS?
Every time I do any review that involves a hard drive array the first question is always "how many streams did you get?" I always laugh because I instantly envision the Brady Bunch open. Of course, "streams" is more than just being able to put a bunch of video clips on the screen, it gives you an indication of how much realtime you'll get.

Well the honest truth is, "I Don't Know." I gave up after I had 15 video tracks running over a graphic, all 15 tracks have Drop Shadow applied (93% opacity, Distance 63) and four of the tracks have Gaussian Blur applied (blur set to 20) along with 11 stereo audio tracks. All with Playback set to Full Resolution. Oh and the video is not all conformed. There is DVCPro HD 720p / 59.94, H.264 1920x1080, ProRes 720p / 59.94 and ProRes 1080i / 29.97 all edited into AVC Intra 1080i / 29.97 timeline. And all of the video has been scaled down so you can see the very messy results.





Remember I said this is Full Resolution. Premiere Pro allows me to drop to 1/2, 1/4, 1/8 or even 1/16 resolution for playback so the lower I drop that, the more ridiculous it gets with the realtime performance. Also keep in mind, there is an NVIDIA Quadro 6000 card in this machine and Premiere Pro is engineered to take advantage of the CUDA power in those cards.

So for these ridiculous amount of video streams with drop shadow and blur, you've got the RAM, CPUs, GPU and RAID speed all coming into play to give me the optimum set up for realtime video playback using Adobe Premiere Pro CS 5.5. You always have to remember it's your entire configuration that gives you the maximum performance on your system, not just any one component. This ONE configuration is solidly set up for creative, realtime performance.


OVERALL PERFORMANCE
As you can imagine, the ProMAX ONE is fast. Easily the fastest performance I've ever experienced with Adobe Premiere Pro and this is with CS 5.5. Response of the editing system was extremely snappy, media loaded up almost instantaneously, importing a batch of 20 clips resulted in the "Generating Peak Files" dialogue just ripping through the files very quickly. It's what every editor wants in an edit system, you just work and the system keeps up. It's unbelievably fast, responsive and allows the end user to just create and not wait for the system. What else is there for me to say in regards to editing than it's a pleasure to work with.

For rendering, I decided to try out both Adobe Media Encoder and Adobe After Effects.

In Adobe Media Encoder I took that same sequence you saw earlier with the 16 tracks, mixed formats, 11 stereo audio tracks, set an outpoint at 34 seconds and set up AME to make a 1920 x 1080 DNxHD 220 29.97 file. I used the "Queue" command as most folks will tell you AME seems to render faster that way then if you just use the Render command in Premiere Pro. It rendered that file in 2:45.





Full resolution HD file with drop shadow on all layers, Gaussian Blur on four layers, 15 tracks of video over a graphic.

In After Effects I started out with a simple map animation we use in one of our current series during host voiceovers since it's a known element for me. Here's a shortened, low resolution copy of what they look like.




As you can see, very simple, actual animation runs approx. 30 seconds with the pad at the head and tail and we render them out in either ProRes or DNxHD in 1920x1080i 29.97. It includes motion blur on all layers and with the 8 Core Mac Pro I usually use for these graphics (with ATI card) it takes approx. 15 minutes per map to render. The ProMAX ONE rendered the full resolution Quicktime DNxHD 1920x1080i 29.97 version of this map in 1:58. That's even faster than another PC computer we're using in our shop right now. We use four of these maps per episode of our series. This means I can render all four of the maps faster than my 8 Core can render one of them.

That's what I call a "real world bench test." It's easy to run those pre-programmed bench tests that all the computer companies and tech reviewers use, but when I test things, I like to use what I call "real tangibles" that I can compare, like this animation that we use each week.

Now for another test, I thought, why not create a bench test that any one of you running After Effects can try for yourself and compare to what the ProMAX ONE can do. This is a VERY simple comp I created using only the tools in AE, so you don't need anything other than AE 5.5 or higher.


Here's a low rez version of what it looks like.





Download the After Effects file...


Download Project Files

I've got about 50 layers or so of solids laid out in 3D space, each has generators applied to it, all of them have motion blur and a camera simply flies around the space with 3 lights lighting up the scene. It's 30 seconds long. This looks deceptively simple, but yet challenges your system to render because of the motion blur and generators applied to each layer.

The Render Queue is already all set to render to an H.264 file with no audio, all you have to do is hit Render. How does your system do on the render? The ProMAX ONE rendered this file in 20 minutes.

For comparison: Our 8 Core Mac Pro (2.4Ghz, 16GB RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5770) rendered the file in 1 hour, 55 minutes. Our 8 Core Dell Precision T5500 (2.4Ghz, 48GB RAM, NVIDIA Quadro 4000) rendered the file in 1 hour 40 minutes.

Our older model 27" iMac in my home office (3.33Ghz Intel Core Duo 2, 8GB RAM) was 1 second, 26 frames into the animation and had an estimated remaining render time of 5 hours, 24 minutes. Needless to say, I stopped the render on that machine.

Comparing the ProMAX One to our in-house machines, this is a tremendous savings in render time and does two things. Allows the end-user to create ever more complex comps in software like After Effects knowing you have the speed of the machine to get the job done by deadline. Gives the end user more piece of mind knowing that the inevitable mistakes and tweaks won't push you right up against the deadline because you're getting the renders done more quickly.


CONCLUSION
The ProMAX ONE is priced correctly for the high end PC workstation market they are aiming at. A Base ProMAX ONE Hero System with 32GB of RAM, Blu-Ray Burner & Windows 7 sells for $8,226. The system as configured for this review (without the Adobe / Avid software) is $17,664, but keep in mind, that's both the upgraded computer system and an 18TB RAID. So while that sounds expensive, it's well within reason for what you're getting.


(Note: bubbling on the side is from the protective plastic which was NOT removed for the testing.)


At this price, it's definitely a major commitment of your finances and you'll have to strongly weigh the cost vs. return on investment. In my facility we have 5 edit suites currently running and four more to come online in the near future. Quite honestly investing in up to 9 of these machines would be cost prohibitive for my situation.

Plus I have shared storage for the facility so the need for an on-board RAID at every workstation is not something we need. In my case, my plan is to install iMacs across the board in the edit suites for editing (we use DNxHD, ProRes and native for most of our work) and have 2 "Big Iron" systems handle all the rendering and DaVinci Resolve. With that render comparison, the ProMAX ONE makes a perfect candidate for our "Big Iron" workstation. In addition, that tremendous RAID speed allows us to handle projects of 4k or more on that workstation when necessary.

Now if all you need is one or two machines, just looking at that render comparison should give you a good sense of the ROI. Incredible to see that older 27" iMac show over 5 hours to render something the ProMAX ONE took 20 minutes to do. That's almost a savings of an entire day. That means you're able to do more in less time and get more billable projects out the door.

No question if you are in the market for a new creative workstation the ProMAX ONE should be on your list of machines to consider. This workstation was designed around speed and flexibility which there's nothing we creative's like more than speed.







Comments

Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Clay Couch
Walter mine did 30 min, however it was a laptop!! I definitely do not need an upgrade :). HP 8770w with k5000m

Clay Couch
Studio Macula LLC
3D animator/compositor
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Alejandro Berrueta
Well so what of my organs do i have to give to own a promax one?
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Chad Gilmour
Maybe a silly question, but are there color space/gamma issues between Mac and Win anymore? I'm thinking about changing 1 machine to a promax, but the bulk of our systems will still Mac and we do lots of distributed rendering over night with C4D. And all our projects are used on just about every machine, so color correction effects would need to appear the same across every system. I seem to remember this being an issue back in the day.
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Ken Mays
The performance of the ProMAX ONE Hero is very impressive!

I noticed the Mac Pro with 3.06Ghz 12-cores, SSD, AMD Radeon 5770, and 64GB RAM is around $8K. So the base prices seem comparable as noted, but the ProMAX Hero is like comparing a Bugatti Veyron with a Nissan GT-R supercar. Rendering the test file at 7 min and 35 seconds in CS6, the base ProMAX ONE Hero simply blows the Mac Pro into the stratosphere.
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Bob Zelin
This is such a great article. I fell in love with the new ProMax Win7 PC at NAB. And it's really NOT expensive - you would pay $5000 - $6000 just for a high quality 8 bay RAID array and controller card, making the computer portion between $2000 - $3000 and for that money (the price of a Quad Core Mac Pro) - it blows the doors off the Mac Pro. Try getting an equivalent HP Z820 and an external 8 bay with a hi quality RAID host card (typically around $900 bucks), and you will spend a LOT more money. This computer is designed to be a stand alone server. It has LOTS of x16 lane slots (4 I believe) and 2 or 3 more slower slots. It has provision for a Sonnet QIO, or LTO tape. It has FOUR ethernet ports (not two that Walter stated), so it can be setup for basic shared storage right from this box.

It's a great computer at a GREAT aggresive price for what they are giving you.

With that said, I just got an HP Z420 (about $1400) because I know that people will want to spend as little as possible, and I want to see what I can do with this nice cheap computer. But I truly believe that the ProMax is a great value for what they are giving you - and the only competition is from HP and Boxx Systems, both which cost more.

Bob Zelin

+1
@ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Pepijn Klijs
I ran the after effects test render as well, just for comparison reasons. I know a lot of people are looking for mac pro alternatives these days.

So, the outcome... In my new workstation, which is a hackintosh build, the render took 23 minutes and 33 secs. It could have been a little faster if I had overclocked more, but I prefer to keep my system more stable and cool. The cpu temperatures were around 64 celcius while rendering, using a multiplier of 42.

I'm using an Asus p9x79 deluxe motherboard, with 16 GB of ram, a i7 3930 K processor and a GTX 560 Ti graphicscard.

Editor/Colorist, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://www.pepijnklijs.nl
@Pepijn Klij
by Pepijn Klijs
I ran the test again, this time in WIN 7, with the same system, except for the RAM, I added another 16 GB.

The total render took 8 minutes and 14 seconds!

Quite a big difference with my Hackintosh test.

Editor/Colorist, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://www.pepijnklijs.nl
+1
@Pepijn Klij
by Paolo Castellano
:-) you made it while I was going asking you to try with Win 7!

Paolo.Castellano@ivs.it
http://www.ivsEdits.com
-----------------------
"Post Fata Resurgo"
@Paolo Castellano
by Pepijn Klijs
And I also ran the test again in OSX, with the extra ram installed. This time it took 10 minutes and 7 seconds. So cs6 seems to love a lot of ram.

Editor/Colorist, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
http://www.pepijnklijs.nl
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Brian Charles
I'm always interested in more speed and have been looking at BTO options for a Windows based box. Still my 2 year old MacPro beats the Hero.

12 core MacPRo 32 GB CS6 Render Time 15 min, 41 sec. Memory and Multiprocessing set to use 12 of 24 CPU's. RAM allocation 2GB per CPU.



@Brian Charle
by Jess Hartmann
Hi Brian - please see the update below done on CS6, the Hero runs in 7 mins 35 seconds. THanks.

Jess Hartmann
CEO
ProMAX Systems
http://www.promax.com
Re: @Brian Charle
by Brian Charles
I did see the impressive results you got with CS6. So I stand corrected.

However, $17K vs 5K, I'd hope the results were substantially better.

Re: @Brian Charle
by walter biscardi
[Brian Charles] "However, $17K vs 5K, I'd hope the results were substantially better."

Do you have an 18TB RAID inside your Mac Pro?

And you did notice that the base price of the HERO without the RAID is around $8k, correct? For $3k I think that's well worth half the render time.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: @Brian Charle
by Brian Charles
[walter biscardi] "Do you have an 18TB RAID inside your Mac Pro?
"


No, I don't, I have a 2TB RAID, 2TB non RAID and a small SSD for a cache. The Hero wins hands down.

You are right, the results are very impressive and for some users, yourself for example, the ROI and cost benefit are meaningful and worth the investment.

@walter biscardi
by Paolo Castellano
Hi Brian,
The price gap may be much slighter; a MAC Pro with 3.06GHz CPUs, 4x1TB HDD and Apple Care (without any Nvidia Quadro and HW raid) lists over 7500.00USD (according Apple Store).
Cheers,

Paolo.Castellano@ivs.it
http://www.ivsEdits.com
-----------------------
"Post Fata Resurgo"
Re: @walter biscardi
by Brian Charles
Fair enough if you buy all components from Apple. My machine is a lowly 12 core 2.66, I bought the RAM and hard drives from third parties.

@Brian Charle
by walter biscardi
This was CS5.5 in the review as I mentioned. CS6 was not on the machine I received.

ProMax has done a test with CS6 showing the render in about 7 minutes so that's twice as fast a render as the 12 Core Mac Pro you mention. That's very significant when you put up something very significant like a 4 to 8 hour render than the ProMax Hero can knock out in 2 - 4 hours.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

Blog Twitter Facebook
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Job ter Burg
"there is no way to encode to ProRes on a Windows workstation"

Apparently, there is. FFMBC lets you encode prores on a Win machine using the command line.
http://code.google.com/p/ffmbc/
@Job ter Burg
by Job ter Burg
P.S.: seems to come with the same gamma issues as the QT encoder does.
@Job ter Burg
by walter biscardi
Apparently, there is. FFMBC lets you encode prores on a Win machine using the command line.

Yes, this has been covered by multiple folks in this thread. There are apparently multiple applications that allow for ProRes encoding of one form or another on Windows. But honestly, I think the KiPro makes the most sense for us.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: MacBook Pro early 2011
by Philippe Kiener
Render time for a early 2011 MacBook Pro
Ram: 16G
2.2 Ghz i7
AMD Radeon HD 6750M 1024M
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Jess Hartmann
So when Walter ran his tests on the ProMAX ONE he did so in CS5.5. As you know there were a lot of performance enhacements in CS6. So to provide a fair comparison for those using CS6, we just ran the test in CS6 on a ProMAX ONE Hero.

Results are: completion in 7 min 35 seconds.



Jess Hartmann
CEO
ProMAX Systems
http://www.promax.com
@Jess Hartmann
by walter biscardi
DANG!!!!!! I guess CS6 really does make a huge difference in the render times.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

Blog Twitter Facebook
Re: @Jess Hartmann
by Bret Williams
There's also the additional issue of RayTracing in CS6, which isn't supported by the iMac GPUs. Had extrusion /raytracing been added to the clips for the test, the iMac would've jumped to days instead of hours for its estimate.
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Robert d'Alexis
Thank you for setting the record straight. :-)
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Victor Perez
Thanks for the review. Have been interested in the ProMAX One and the RAIN Element 2 as a possible replacement to one of my MacPros. At first, cost seemed to be a barrier, but if one considers adding a new raid, the cost factor is comparable. I was impressed with the speed test as well. Seems these all in one solutions will be the next phase of high end PC's.

Also thanks to the others for posting simpler ProRes export workflows from a Windows machine.

Victor
http://www.editvictor.com
http://www.hbhm.tv
http://www.itvisus.com
@Victor Perez
by walter biscardi
Yes, when you factor in the RAID, the price of the machine is very fair for what you are getting. Is it cheap? Nope, but for what this machine is, I think ProMAX has the price in the right ballpark.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: Tutorial: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Paul Jay
It's an awesome machine, but i'm not sure if i want all that harddrive heat in a workstation internally.
@Paul Jay
by Paul Jay
And the Quadro 6000 card alone is 3500 euro's. :P
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Paolo Castellano
Hello Walter,
Thank you for sharing the review, but as tech lover, I'd have loved to find something more.

I'd love to see what's in the box. There are no inside pictures, and no mention of the components used to build this hero. I'm thinking to the internal airflow, to the mainboard, to the drives and to the RAID host bus adapter (and its management software).
18TB of RAID5 means about 13.8TB net, and a problem of RAID consistency would be a disaster.

I'm surprised from the result of the RAID benchmark. Usually even the most advanced RAID HBA can't multiply perfectly the performances of a single drive. 18TB means 6x3TB 7200RPM drives. 1310/6 means that each drive can sustain at least 218MBps; I haven't find any 7200rpm able to do it.
Moreover, in my opinion, the AJA System Test is not the only (and best) way to test an array. In the video editing we use several streams of video so it is important to know what is the RAID capability to read several files at the same time. For this reason I use an old and free tool called "Nbench". It allows to specify the number of concurrent threads and get speed result from each one (max number about 20, max file size 20x999MB i.e. about 20GB).
I hope you are you in time to integrate the review.
Many thanks and greetings from Italy,

Paolo.Castellano@ivs.it
http://www.ivsEdits.com
-----------------------
"Post Fata Resurgo"
@Paolo Castellano
by walter biscardi
The AJA test is what we run on all our systems though Small Tree also has a Streams test application.

The machine is gone so any further testing will have to go through ProMax.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Robert d'Alexis
Nice review, Walter, but I am surprised at the time the ProMax One took to render the ProMax One test composition in After Effects. My "modest" machine only took 15 Min 32 sec to render the same composition.
My specs are as follows:
i7 3960X
Asus P9X79WS (in performance mode)
64 GB of RAM
Quadro 5000
1 OCZ Vertex 3 for the OS
4 OCZ Vertex 3 in RAID 0 for the media
Win 7 64 Ultimate
+1
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by santiago marti
It took my iBuypower laptop 30 minutes, running AE CS6, so maybe the newer AE version is key.

Santiago Martí
Director at
http://www.robotrojo.com.ar
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Robert d'Alexis
I forgot to mention that I am running After Effects CS6 as well.
@Robert d'Alexi
by walter biscardi
It's very possible that CS6 is making the renders go even faster as they have done a lot of work on that. CS6 was not functional on the review system hence my using AE 5.5

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Gregg T. Karr
The Render Queue is already all set to render to an H.264 file with no audio, all you have to do is hit Render. How does your system do on the render? The ProMAX ONE rendered this file in 20 minutes.

Just giving some "real world" feedback on this test render Walter provide... I copied the files to my desktop, opened it in AE and hit the "render" button.

My 2007 2,1 Mac Pro blazed through it in 37mins. Way under the almost 2HR mark of his test machines?? And... only 17mins longer than a box built for speed?? Hmm... Maybe I don't need a new computer.



Specs:
MacPro2,1
Quad-Core Intel Xeon / 3GHz
Cores: 8
32 GM 677 MHZ DDR2 FB-DIMM of Memory
ATI Radeon X1900 XT video card
After Effects CS6


Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Robert Ober
Anybody Hackintosh one of these babies?
+1
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Tim Wilson
Nice review, Walter!

Server is only necessary for the Telestream products. The fact is that you might see some real benefit by throwing a beast like the ONE at those products, but as Michael points out, there are other options.

FFmpeg is not only free as Michael notes, but also significantly faster than Compressor.

Do you remember ProCoder? This was considered a worthy alternative to Cleaner back in the day, and is now owned by Harmonic. You can use it to encode to any ProRes format directly from your Premiere timeline. No muss, no fuss.

I agree with Michael, though -- there are good, even free, ways to encode to ProRes on Windows, proven in pro workflows. Whatever else factors into someone's decision to add Windows into their shop, hesitation over ProRes encoding shouldn't be one of them.

Tim Wilson
Associate Publisher, Editor-in-Chief
Creative COW Magazine
Twitter: timdoubleyou

Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by walter biscardi
So I have to find Windows 2008 Server to do that? Well I guess with four boot drives on the One that's a possibility to load it up on one of the boot drives.

As we already own an AJA KiPro and KiPro Mini, easier for us just to use those, but thanks for the clarification.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

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Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Michael Kammes
Thanks for the review Walter!

Slight note of contention...minor, but it's very important in many workflows:

You can most certainly encode into ProRes on Windows with software. Telestream Products (Episode, etc.) that have Windows 2008 Server can do it. ffmpeg (free!) can do it. (even easier with AnotherGUI).

Sorry to nitpick - not my intention, but Prores encode on Windows is a misconception that has yielded some really odd workflows.

I appreciate your effort with this review!

~Michael



.: michael kammes mpse
.: senior technology & workflow consultant
.: audio specialist . act fcp . acsr
.: michaelkammes.com
.: twitter: @michaelkammes
.: facebook: /mkammes

Hear me pontificate: Speaking Schedule .
Re: ProMAX ONE: Looking at the Hero
by Frank Gothmann
[Michael Kammes] "Thanks for the review Walter!

Slight note of contention...minor, but it's very important in many workflows:

You can most certainly encode into ProRes on Windows with software. Telestream Products (Episode, etc.) that have Windows 2008 Server can do it. ffmpeg (free!) can do it. (even easier with AnotherGUI).

Sorry to nitpick - not my intention, but Prores encode on Windows is a misconception that has yielded some really odd workflows.

I appreciate your effort with this review!

~Michael"



Good looking machine. Here is a post I wrote a while back, free Prores encoding on Win7 using AnotherGui and FFMPEG how-to. Very easy.

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/335/30139

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