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Post Etiquette 2: Engage Your Client

CreativeCOW presents Post Etiquette 2: Engage Your Client -- Art of the Edit Tutorial


Biscardi Creative Media
Buford Georgia USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


Don't turn your back on your client! Instead, create an ideal environment for collaboration.



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WalterBiscardi.com is advice, inspiration & training from working creative professionals on all aspects of the creative industry from pre-production to post to growing your career and business. Learn from working editors, photographers, sound designers, colorists, producers, directors and more to not only learn the basic skills, but real-world, insider knowledge on getting the right job and then building your career in the Film, Television and Creative Media Industry.

Comments

Re: Post Etiquette 2: Engage Your Client
by Mark Suszko
A lot of old suites were designed taking their layout cues from the "trench" style layouts in production trucks or old network control rooms, with the clients sitting behind the editor on a couch or at a desk. This was never an ideal arrangement for collaboration, more for situations where the editor was a human version of a remote control, just executing each move a director/producer barked from behind them.


I'm a huge proponent of using an L-shaped desk that gives your client a chance to sit along-side, for eye contact, but still with a modicum of distance. They need enough space to lay out and organize notes, boxes of media, a laptop, their snacks, whatever, without crowding you or your gear. You need to be able to see their face reacting to the monitor, and reacting to you, when you talk to them.




The little island creates a shared space that you can use to spread out your own "stuff" when working alone, or it can be shared with the client or producer. Having had the occasional client with a halitosis problem (coffee breath, yuck), the short separation of the side table also gives a welcome physical and psychological distance to make the editor feel uncrowded, while still keeping the clients close enough to engage.

The island can also be partly filled in underneath with cabinetry to discreetly store away user manuals, the computer tower or drive arrays, routing panels, etc. with some sound isolation ability. For me, this setup is the best of both worlds. If I have a chance to build a suite, this is the way I'd lay out the desk.
Re: Post Etiquette 2: Engage Your Client
by Patrick Givens
I agree with you Mark, the L-shape setups are nice for today's edit suites where there's a lot more space due to a lot less equipment needed. Back in the day, the "trench" style layouts were the only way to fit everything & everyone in the same room. Most linear room edit suites usually contained a switcher & audio board (both the size of large doors), the edit controller, a couple of DVEs, a Chyron or CG, stacked rows of preview & program monitors, a couple of big heavy computer monitors, waveforms & vector scopes, and possibly a 1/4" reel to reel and several misc pieces. So the producers were forced to sit back behind the editor...... there was no other place to put them. So they sat usually at a nice sized producers table or a big comfy couch behind that table (both elevated above the editor's "trench"). Though I did have a few clients that enjoyed rolling a chair down next to me typing on the CG or pushing whatever button they could.

•pgivens•


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