LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

The NASA IMAX Project with Cinematographer James Neihouse

COW Library : Cinematography : Creative COW : The NASA IMAX Project with Cinematographer James Neihouse
CreativeCOW presents The NASA IMAX Project with Cinematographer James Neihouse -- Cinematography Feature

Creative COWCreative COW
News report from Burbank, California USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


In the highly demanding environments he works in, large-format cinematographer James Neihouse needs equipment that performs perfectly each and every time. OConnor's 2575 and 2065 have become indispensable for him, and he's relied upon them heavily for many 3D and IMAX collaborations. No matter how magnificent or daunting the locale, he's always focused on getting the shot that everyone will remember, no matter what the filming conditions.

"You don't get a second chance to shoot a rocket launch," says Neihouse, who puts OConnor equipment at the top of his equipment list. "You prepare for years to get something special, or prep extensively for a specific shot to be executed just right. You cannot afford to fail, and that's why I want OConnor.


James Neihouse on NASA's 3D IMAX production
James Neihouse is one of only five cinematographers invited this year to join The Academy®. The Academy's members number around 6,000 worldwide, and just once each year, new inductees are invited to join the esteemed organization.


"When working with the astronauts I try to do the heavy lifting for them. We joke that I'm their "zero-g simulator" so, having a light weight system is crucial. That's why the 1030 system with carbon fiber legs is perfect to support my medium sized Canon C500. The 90 degree tilt range of the 1030 made it easy to shoot straight up, looking out the cupola window simulating the earth as seen from 230 miles out in space. With most other systems I'd have to use a tilt plate to get a total vertical, or maybe shorten one tripod leg, but the 1030 handles it in stride, making set ups quicker, which is a huge deal when every minute of the astronaut's time in pre-flight training is over-subscribed."

Neihouse is a veteran of more than 35 large format films, and has trained a number of missions of astronauts to shoot in space, including the astronauts involved in shooting the unforgettable "Hubble 3D," in 2010 produced by Warner Brothers. In that stunning footage, seven astronauts on the Space Shuttle Atlantis repair and restore the Hubble Space Telescope. The film is a combination of IMAX footage and handheld video done by the shuttle crew during their mission. Neihouse created the film's ground footage, which included shooting an impressive launch.

The OConnor 2575 was key to the project, which was narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio. The 2575 could support the 90 pound weight of the IMAX 30 perf 3D camera, while still remaining agile in the process. While other heads could have supported the camera, none were as light or easy to use, obviously mission critical requirements of the project. Since they were shooting on a "non-interference" basis around NASA and the launch support systems at the Kennedy Space Center, the crew could be asked to move at any time to accommodate operations.


Kimiya Yui, JAXA astronaut and Dr. Kjell Lindgrenand, a NASA astronaut
Kimiya Yui, of the Japanese Exploration Aerospace Agency (JAXA) above left, and Dr. Kjell Lindgren (right), of NASA.


"It's nice knowing you have the best equipment on your side during every production, but it becomes crucial during a launch. There's always an element of the unknown in that environment," says Neihouse. "And, you need to be as prepared as possible when you might have to get up and run to another location."

Though the astronauts didn't use tripods in space, his cameras in the NASA simulators needed a consistent support system. He found the OConnor 2575 more than up to the task.

"The (30 perf IMAX) camera was mounted in the cargo bay, very close to where the bottom of the Hubble Space Telescope would be," says Neihouse. "Using the 2575 allowed us to put the camera in the simulator in the same orientation ICBC3D would be in the actual space shuttle. The crew was then able to shoot training footage and see what it looks like on the giant IMAX screen. It's a great teaching tool."



Kimiya Yui and Dr. Kjell Lindgren are two of the three newly-appointed International Space Station crew members to round out future expeditions to the orbiting laboratory.


The 2575 was a big hit with the astronauts as they were training, according to Neihouse. "They are always looking for equipment that's so rock solid, they'll never have to worry about it.

Neihouse also relied upon the 2575 while shooting in Kazakhstan for the 2002 documentary "Space Station 3D," a project narrated by Tom Cruise. He spent a lot of time around the launch pads, trying to get the best shots possible for the film. During a piece of the first launch of the Space Station, he got a gorgeous long lens shot of the lift off and tracked the rocket with the OConnor.

"Lots of people who see that shot think it was done from a mechanical tracker, or stabilized head," explains Neihouse. "But, it was just me and the 2575."

The cinematographer has a special love for the work he's done with NASA. And, NASA has reciprocated by awarding him a Silver Snoopy, an honor given to NASA employees or contractors who make significant contributions to flight safety or mission success and two NASA Group Achievement awards.

OConnor equipment has played a crucial role in the cinematographer's work with earth-bound projects, too. For 2004's documentary "NASCAR 3D: The IMAX Experience", Neihouse used the 2575 for 2D camera shots that were later converted to 3D during post production.

Summing up the incredible work he's been a part of, Neihouse notes, "Anything for an adventure. In all of these great environments, it is imperative that I come equipped with undeniable tools that make getting the shot possible. That's what OConnor is all about."

Earth 2.0 (working title), is an IMAX 3D film that will be shot over the course of a year using multiple astronaut crews. The film is co-produced with NASA and Walt Disney Pictures, and set for release in 2016.








Follow James Neihouse on Twitter at @70mmDP


About OConnor
OConnor has been the choice of professional cinematographers since the invention of the fluid head 60 years ago by founder Chad O'Connor. OConnor's award-winning fluid heads are known for their smooth feel, fluid movement and intuitive control. Designed for film-style shooting, each facilitates seamless transition when changing payloads and offers stepless, ultra-smooth pan & tilt fluid drag for maximum control. In addition to fluid heads and tripods, OConnor offers a growing line of camera and lens accessories engineered to fill the needs of today's fast-paced camera work. The line includes the CFF-1 and new O-Focus DM follow focus systems for cine and still photo lenses, the award-winning O-Box WM mattebox, innovative O-Grip handgrip system and the Universal Baseplate. OConnor products are respected and trusted by individual users and rental houses worldwide for their reliability, longevity and toughness. Along with other leading brands in the broadcast industry, OConnor is part of the Vitec Videocom, a Vitec Group company.

For more information on OConnor, visit www.ocon.com.

Follow Us: https://www.facebook.com/ocon.com

Like Us: https://twitter.com/OCon_com


About Vitec Group
Capture the moment™
For over 100 years, through every innovation in photography, film and digital image-making, Vitec businesses have developed a powerful portfolio of brand and products that have enabled some of the most amazing moments to be captured under some of the most challenging conditions. Vitec is an international Group principally serving customers in the broadcast photographic and military aerospace and government (MAG) markets. Vitec is based on strong, well-known premium brands on which its customers worldwide rely. Vitec is organized in three divisions: Videocom, Imaging and Services. Videocom designs and distributes systems and products used in broadcasting and live entertainment, film and video production and MAG. Imaging designs, manufactures and distributes equipment and accessories for photography, video and events. Services provides equipment rental, workflow design and technical support for camera, video, audio, fiber optic and wireless technology used by TV production and film crews. More information can be found at www.vitecgroup.com.


THE ACADEMY® and ACADEMY AWARDS® are the registered trademarks and service marks of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ALL RIGHTS ARE RESERVED.



Related Articles / Tutorials:
Cinematography
Small HD FOCUS 7 4K Monitor Hands On

Small HD FOCUS 7 4K Monitor Hands On

Here's a first look at the SmallHD FOCUS 7, a 7-inch, 4K monitor that packs significant production value in a moderate price. The monitor includes Small HD’s OS3 software, which gives users access to features such as pinch-to-zoom, waveform monitors, focus pulling, 3D LUTs, and more, in a build that's lightweight, durable, and retains mobility.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
GoPro HERO7 First Look

GoPro HERO7 First Look

The new GoPro HERO7 can do WHAT? Join Steven John Irby, co-owner and director of Street Dreams Magazine, for a look at the most advanced GoPro yet: HyperSmooth Stabilization, TimeWarp Video, live streaming, voice control, waterproof, and much more.


Adorama TV
Cinematography
Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

Five Cinematic Drone Shots For You To Master

If you tend to put your drone up in the air and then struggle with what to do next, or if you just randomly shoot around filling up your memory card, then this tutorial is for you. Here are 5 cinematic drone shots that, with a little practice, will take your aerial cinematography to the next level.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Filming In Small Spaces

Filming In Small Spaces

"Penned" is a narrative series shot on location in New York, which means working in lots of small spaces. The team not only explores how these challenges call upon their highest level of creativity in the shortest amount of time, but also lay out how these challenges give some of the most creative results. The producers, director, and DP all share their tricks and advice including connecting the corners, putting light in Z space, having the lens closer to a foreground element, and utilizing high ceilings.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

In-Camera Video Transition Hacks

When you think about video transitions, your mind might first turn to software, but as Surfaced Studio vfx guru Tobias Gleissenberger points out, some of the cleverest, most-effective, and easiest transitions to create are ones that take place primarily in your camera. A little pre-production planning and a little timeline finesse can work magic!

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Cinematography
Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

Creating Interactive 360 Aerial Panoramas with Your Drone

From Where I Drone's Dirk Dallas will show you how to capture and stitch together an interactive 360 aerial panorama image using your drone. Dirk will also give you some expert tips on how he shoots and processes panoramic images using the Litchi app for iOS and Android, PTGui and Adobe Photoshop, along with some DIY options.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

Through The Lens: Alex Strohl

The "why" of Alex Strohl's work as a nature photographer: to inspire people to get outside. In this presentation from Adorama TV, Alex talks about what led him to the American West, the mysteries of our interaction with water, and the magic that can happen when things go wrong.

Tutorial
Adorama TV
Cinematography
RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

RBG's DP: Claudia Raschke, Ruth Ginsburg & Canon C300 Mk II

In his conversation with Claudia Raschke, the cinematographer of the acclaimed documentary "RBG" featuring Supreme Court Justice and folk hero Ruth Bader Ginsburg, DP Jimmy Matlosz speaks to her about the Canon C300, the challenges of shooting such a high-profile subject, and the influence of dance on her approach to documentary filmmaking. A truly remarkable conversation about multiple remarkable subjects.

Feature, People / Interview
Jimmy Matlosz
Cinematography
Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Rick Ray of DVArchive has traveled the world, lived in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, played ragtime piano for money in Australian bars, and both been arrested in Ethiopa and recruited those same police to be in his videos the very next day. In his NAB Show presentation for Adobe Stock, Rick gets specific about how to make real money in stock video following your passion around the world, what kind of equipment to choose and avoid, and yes, some advice about talking your way out of trouble.


Cow News
Cinematography
Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Charlotte Bruus Christensen is the Danish cinematographer behind the lens of the horrifying and beautifully shot film A Quiet Place. Charlotte joins commercial director and Go Creative Show host Ben Consoli to discuss the camera, lighting, and lensing choices for A Quiet Place, its unique sound design and how show created its horrifying yet warm look.


Ben Consoli
MORE
© 2019 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]