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What Comes After Landing that Big Editing Job?

COW Library : Art of the Edit : The Editors' Lounge : What Comes After Landing that Big Editing Job?
CreativeCOW presents What Comes After Landing that Big Editing Job? -- Art of the Edit Editorial


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The challenges and strategies of starting and finishing a new editing project


From left to right, Zack Arnold, Dan Lebental, Yvette Arimian & Norman Hollyn


Sitting in on a meeting of The Editors' Lounge can be informative to say the least, and advance your career with wise words and not only been-there-done-that-information, but a real melting pot of new information and strategy. Landing an editing gig in film and television can be very tough and it all begins with being prepared prior to the job interview. In the latest installment of the Editor's Lounge discussion panel series I've Landed A Project, Now What?" Award-winning film and television editors Zack Arnold (Empire), Yvette Arimian (Whale Wars) and Dan Lebental (Iron Man) share invaluable tips on what it takes to get and keep the most sought after editing jobs in Hollywood.

In Dan Lebental's words when it comes to the interview process he said, "I approach interviews as if I'm interviewing them as well. I like to bring up anything that might be a challenge or flaw right away because I want to see if they are going to be collaborative." Preparation before the job interview can also include reading scripts, watching old episodes to get a feel for tone and style, and looking at the resumes of the team you will be working with. Whether you're just starting out, or are a seasoned editor, these are key elements in not only helping you land the job, but in making an informed decision on whether the job is the right fit for you.



Dan Lebental, Film Editor (Iron Man)



So, what happens once you do land the editing job of your dreams? Again. it's all about being prepared. Zack Arnold uses a trick he calls"method editing" where he finds out what music the writers were listening to when writing the show. "I'm now in their headspace," said Arnold. "Where method actors will just become the character, I've developed this process where I completely just become immersed in whatever type of show it is. I make sure I understand what the director and writer sees, so by the time I start editing, it's what they are looking for." Norman Hollyn added that "crawling up inside the director's head" and understanding their thought process makes it easier when it comes to choices once you're in the editing room. It's important to remember before the editing process even begins to lay groundwork early by having conversations with the director or producer about things such as tone and the vision for the show or film overall.



Zack Arnold, Television Editor (Empire)


When it comes to storytelling, communication is crucial and editors must always ask themselves if they are communicating the tone and vision that's expected. Yvette Amirian explained how it's important not to get attached to the first cut on a project. "You have to take yourself out of it emotionally. You just have to say it's bigger than me; I have to make the best show. I want to be happy but the people I'm working with have to be pleased with it as well." Editors must be open to interpreting notes, making changes and understanding the "note behind the note. "All media and all stories are like writing essays, you have to land what you are trying to communicate," said Dan Lebental.



Yvette Amirian, Television Editor (Whale Wars) & Norman Hollyn, Film & Television Editor (Heathers)


It's important to establish trust with the team you've been hired to work with. Film and television editing is a collaborative process and being open and honest many times gets editors further in their careers than just talent alone. Most editing projects require long working hours with the same team over a period of months. Directors and producers expect editors to be reliable, with the assurance that they have everyone's best interests in mind. Not buckling under pressure and becoming difficult to work with during tight delivery schedules, where many times, last minute changes to the story are needed.

The evening concluded with questions from the audience and from the webcast, submitted via Twitter. Topics included additional discussion on office politics, what to do when a cut isn't working and how it's becoming more common for film and television editors to have more than just editing skills.

To see I've Landed A Project, Now What in its entirety and other educational videos related to film and television editing visit the Editors' Lounge Channel.



Editors' Lounge: Tackling New Projects - Part 1 of 2


Editor's Discussion Panel: Tackling New Projects
October 23, 2015 - PART 1

Have you ever asked yourself: "I've been hired: now what?" This edition of the Editor's Panel Discussion Series focuses on getting started and making it to the finish line of an editing project, including job preparation, office politics, maintaining creativity, and more.


The guest panelists:
Yvette Amirian, editor Inside Secret America and Whale Wars

Zack Arnold, editor Empire and Burn Notice

Dan Lebental, editor Ant-Man and Iron Man 2

Moderated by Norman Hollyn, editor Heathers and Wild Palms

Discussion Topics:

  • Introduction @ 00:12
  • Prep before shooting @ 09:15
  • Importance of script supervisors @ 15:30
  • Prep before editing begins @ 16:12
  • Establishing a project workflow @ 20:26
  • Re-cut notes that contradict your view of scene @ 31.40
  • Documentary vs. fiction rewrites @ 35:13
  • Handling office politics, working w directors & producers @ 40:00




Tackling New Projects - Part 2 of 2


Editor's Discussion Panel: Tackling New Projects

October 23, 2015 - PART 2

Have you ever asked yourself: "I've been hired: now what?" This edition of the Editor's Panel Discussion Series focuses on getting started and making it to the finish line of an editing project, including job preparation, office politics, maintaining creativity, and more.

The guest panelists:
Yvette Amirian, editor Inside Secret America and Whale Wars
Zack Arnold, editor Empire and Burn Notice
Dan Lebental, editor Ant-Man and Iron Man 2

Moderated by Norman Hollyn, editor Heathers and Wild Palms Discussion Topics:
  • Maintaining the joy of storytelling @ 00:33
  • Movie preview process @ 07:25
  • Making action scenes emotional @ 14:05
  • Tips on selling your cut @ 16:40
  • Relationship with director or producers @ 18:20
  • Emotional content shifting the tone @ 21:45
  • Changing dynamics of shooting digital @ 24:30
  • The power of saying no @ 27:50
  • Building trust with directors, producers @ 34:00
  • Editor's cut vs shooting script @ 41:00
  • Keeping track of story/character development @ 45:00






Follow the Editors' Lounge on Facebook for updates. https://www.facebook.com/Editors-Lounge-263587583691694/?fref=ts

Follow on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/EditorsLoungeAbout the Editors' Lounge: The Editors' Lounge is a hands-on seminar for industry professionals. Each month, scores of professionals in the production and post-production industries exchange ideas, discuss trends and learn about new technologies; allowing editors to have their questions addressed objectively. To learn more visit http://www.editorslounge.com



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