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Method Studios Creates Dramatic Effects for Divergent

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CreativeCOW presents Method Studios Creates Dramatic Effects for Divergent -- TV & Movie Appreciation Editorial

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Visual effects house Method Studios, a Deluxe Entertainment Services Group company, was the lead vendor on Summit Entertainment's "Divergent," which has grossed over $175 million at the worldwide box office in its first four weeks of release. Summit Entertainment, a LIONSGATE® company, brought the film to theaters in North America on March 21, 2014.

Method's crew was led by visual effects supervisor Matt Dessero. Overall, Method completed 381 shots, creating a variety of complex environments, set extensions, digital doubles and CG characters throughout the movie, which is set in the Chicago of the future. Jim Berney was the production's visual effects supervisor, with Greg Baxter producing.



Tris and Four share a moment in Divergent. Final comp. Click on images to zoom.



Before plate.


"'Divergent' required exclusively invisible and seamless effects work, particularly the scene in the Mirror Room," Berney said. "It was a huge technical and creative challenge that took an immense amount of planning and finesse. Matt Dessero and the team at Method really impressed me and I have to say, I love the final result. I wouldn't change a pixel. They nailed it."

"It definitely was our most complex sequence," agreed Dessero. "As Tris wakes up, she steps towards a mirror wall but something is not quite right. She looks to the left and a wall that was solid is now floor to floor mirror. She turns back one more time only to reveal that the entire room is now floor to floor mirror; her reflections travelling to infinity, thus setting the tone for this scene.



Final shot in the mirror room.



Before plate with Shailene Woodley as Tris. As a side note, Method also delivered a CG version of the dog that Tris meets in the room.


"The photorealism of the Mirror Room was realized by capturing as many close reflections as possible on film," Dessero added. "This was accomplished by setting up six Alexa cameras on a greenscreen stage. The resulting imagery was then tiled and placed on cards and reflected into the scene. Full CG rotomation of Tris was required for the distant Tris reflections which allowed us to give more complexity to the lighting design.


Tris in the Mirror Room. Final shot and original plate.

"As Tris exits the simulation, the sequence which was shot with a real dog culminates with a full CG dog. This sequence of several dozen shots was challenging both on set and in post, and ultimately very gratifying to see accomplished and one of which we are very proud."

Several exterior scenes of the destroyed city were completed by using various techniques from projected matte paintings to full CG. Wind turbines and cabling are added throughout the city. Some shots contain over 500 turbines and hundreds of digital extras were created. A digital vegetation system was created to replace the flowing blue water in the river and Lake Michigan with trickles of brown water, dry grass and swampland.


Overview shot of the Navy Pier and the Ferris wheel. Final comp and plate above.

For a menacing 130-foot fence that surrounds the city, a 30 foot cement fence was shot on location to which Method added 100 foot tall metal towers and guard shacks.



Method created numerous versions of Chicago's elevated train, with CG tracks and futuristic train cars. The final shot of 2114 Chicago.



Before plate. Overall, 381 shots were completed, creating a variety of complex environments, set extensions, digital doubles and CG characters.


Method also created numerous versions of Chicago's famed elevated train, with CG tracks and futuristic train cars. For one particular action packed sequence where Tris and others arrive at the Dauntless Compound, a variety of brick buildings were created including the roofs and a huge glass atrium, with digital doubles jumping from train cars to rooftops which augmented the leaps of real stunt people.

An attacking flock of birds testing Tris during a fear simulation drill were entirely CG. The underwater tank sequence was shot on a stage in a water tank. Method added a spider web of cracks to the glass and augmented the large plates of exploding cracked glass in the wide shots.

Method built assets which were shared with other VFX vendors and included digital doubles, turbines, trees and lake beds.



Method Studios VFX Breakdown for Summit Entertainment's Divergent







"Divergent" is a Summit Entertainment presentation of a Red Wagon Entertainment production of a Neil Burger film, directed by Neil Burger with a screenplay by Evan Daugherty and Vanessa Taylor. The film is based on the book by Veronica Roth, and was produced by Douglas Wick, Lucy Fisher and Pouya Shabazian. John J. Kelly and Rachel Shane were executive producers. All images and clips © 2014 Summit Entertainment.


About Method Studios
Method Studios ( http://www.methodstudios.com ) is an award-winning international visual effects group with facilities in Los Angeles, Vancouver, New York, Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, London, Sydney and Melbourne.

As an artist-driven company known for its creativity, Method services high-end feature film, commercial and motion graphics clients in the global marketplace. Post production offerings include conceptual design, look development, 3D animation/CGI, motion graphics, matte painting, compositing and finishing.

Credits include the commercials DirecTV "Troll" (AICP Award for Animation), Super Bowl hit Kia "Space Babies," Chevy "2012 Silverado" (VES Award and HPA Award winner); and films "RoboCop," "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire," "Thor: The Dark World," "White House Down," "Iron Man 3," "Cloud Atlas," "Argo," and "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter."


About Deluxe
Deluxe Entertainment Services Group Inc. is a global leader in media and entertainment services for film, video and online content, from capture to consumption.

Since 1915, Deluxe has been the trusted partner for the world's most successful Hollywood studios, independent film companies, TV networks, exhibitors, advertisers and others, offering best-in-class solutions in production, post production, distribution, asset and workflow management and new digital solution-based technologies.

With operations in Los Angeles, New York and around the globe, the company employs nearly 6,000 of the most talented, highly honored and recognized artists and industry veterans worldwide. Deluxe is a wholly owned subsidiary of MacAndrews & Forbes Holdings Inc.

For more information visit http://www.bydeluxe.com



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