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Learning the Tools 4: The Slip & Slide Tools

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CreativeCOW presents Learning the Tools 4: The Slip & Slide Tools -- Adobe Premiere Pro basics Tutorial


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In this Premiere Pro tutorial, Andrew Devis demonstrates how the slip and slide tools work, and gives a quick hint on how to remember which is which!



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Comments

Re: Learning the Tools 4: The Slip & Slide Tools
by Jonas Bendsen
"The problem you have is that keyframes are clip based and not track based, so they are always associated with the clips and will move with them."

Right. It's just too bad that Adobe doesn't allow for slipping/sliding without moving the keyframes (since it would be very useful, and is what the slip/slide feature is intended to do --move video without altering anything else).

The work around I've been using is this:

1. Untick "pin to clip" from the drop down menu in the upper right of the Effect Controls tab. This allows you to zoom out on the Effect Controls timeline so you can select all of your keyframes. While you are in this panel, also be sure that "snap" is ticked for when you move your keyframes.

2. Use the "next keyframe" button to go exactly to your first keyframe point and set your Timeline Play Bar at that point (maybe take note of the time, just in case your playback bar is accidentally moved).

3. Slip the video in the clip.

4. Select all your keyframes and then drag the first keyframe back to the original time (where the timeline Play Bar is currently located). If you have "snap" selected from the Effect Controls tab drop down, you are assured that the keyframes are snapped easily and exactly into the right place.

Obviously it would be a lot easier if the video could just slip "under" the keyframes, but this is a useable workaround.

Thanks, Andrew!

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This is my life, I edit and edit and edit and edit...
@Learning the Tools 4: The Slip & Slide Tools
by Jonas Bendsen
Great tutorial. I am looking for a way to slide video, but leave keyframes intact. Suggestions? I've built a rather elaborate series of motion effects (using "motion/position" keyframes) on a clip, and I want to slide the video in the clip while leaving the keyframes in place. Sliding/slipping the video also slides/slips the keyframes. I need the keyframes to remain in place (with regard to the track) while I slip the video in the clip. Selecting "unpin from clip" for the effect doesn't seem to do what it suggests (because what it suggests would be perfect).

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This is my life, I edit and edit and edit and edit...
@Jonas Bendsen
by Andrew Devis
Hi Jonas

The problem you have is that keyframes are clip based and not track based, so they are always associated with the clips and will move with them.

The only way I could think to do what you want - as long as the animation still remained across a single clip - would be firstly to deselect all clips and then hit 'M' to get a sequence marker so you know where you want the keyframes to go/stay. Then, select the keyframes in the Effect Controls window and then right-click > cut and then move the clip (slip or slide) and then go to the marker, select the clip and right-click > paste.

Sorry it isn't easier than that, but as I said, it is a clip based animation issue.

Another way, would be to add the marker as mentioned above and then slip/slide the clip and then select the markers in the Effects Control panel and simply move them in that panel - but it may not be quite as precise.

Hope this helps
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
@Learning the Tools 4: The Slip & Slide Tools
by Robert Model
Andrew ,
Excellent tutorials, as always
bob
@Robert Model
by Andrew Devis
:o)

It's good to know that they are being helpful ... I really should get round to doing some more PP tutorials. Hopefully before the end of the year ....

What this space ;o)

Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...


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