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Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 67 Color 20: Blend Modes 1

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In this tutorial, Andrew Devis starts by showing how to animate an effect from the 'generate' category of effects and then shows how to use 'blend modes' to blend a reasonably flat piece of footage with the animated effect below to give a little more life or interest to the shot.



Play Video Tutorial


Comments

Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 67 Color 20: Blend Modes 1
by Milad Tangshir
Hello Mr. Devis
My name is Milad Tangshir, I am an Iranian student here in Italy and I am editing my first film now. I must say your tutorials on Premier Pro are priceless. Your teaching process could not get more smooth and pleasing to follow. They mean so much to me, just like being able to follow my dreams. I deeply believe after years they must give you an important award. Because the things you are doing are playing a major part in the upcoming generations of filmmakers; from all over the world, where they don’t afford or find the proper film education. Hats off to you sir.
I got few questions that I would really appreciate if you could find the time to answer to:
1. This is my first experience. (55 mins). The 60% of the footage is HDV 1440x1080 25F. There are also lots of other videos, brolls and footage from interviews and old films in it, obviously with various resolutions and frame rates. The 1st footage I imported was 1280x720, 30f. So this is the resolution of my ONLY sequence which includes my whole film! I know that sounds amateur! So after that I brought in all my other various stuff and for every shot I had to rearrange with motion and position and scale details. Now, I know about nesting and breaking a long project into parts and sequences. Now, if I do it, I have to make sequences (60% of the stuff) in 1440x1080 25f, and I have to rearrange all the shots in the sense of motion, scale and position again. And also I have to make other various types of sequences for various stuff that I have in the timeline. (All with various resolutions).
So do I have to do that or leave it like this? The fact that my complete film sequence is 1280x720 will affect my final result? That’s the most important question I guess. I have to wait for your guidance before I can start nesting and ordering things in there… What’s your advice for my situation now?

2. With fast color corrector, -ALWAYS as a default-, do you prefer to do just the white balance or also the black and gray balances? Or just playing with gamma? I mean as a default way of working…

3. You know for every young filmmaker, getting closer to the film look is a huge objective. So, do you think vignette should be applied on whole project or do you think it’s better to use it here or there as a dramatic effect on few shots? (and the shots that have parts that distract the attention). Do you recommend putting it on whole project?

4. In the film blending technique, do you do this as an alternative to general color correction process? Because in the video tutorial, you work on the raw footage (deleting the mattes and the black video). So it does not seem possible to duplicate the color corrected footage 2-3 times?! Right? If I go for fast color correction, so I cannot do this film blending? and so I will lose that 1 pixel blur that you say helps the look?
Is it either color correction or film blending technique? This is really confusing to me…So when you want to get closer to film look, do you suggest applying this technique on all shots of the film? (55 mins)

5. In this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUddE_A9Jxw) I learned to add to crop of 13% on top and bottom of the image to have the Cinemascope 2.39:1 look. But I did not shot the film with this in mind, do you suggest using it, (I know I have to check and put the important stuff in the shot), but I want to know what is your idea about it? Or any other way that you may know that hurt the picture less…

I am so sorry and ashamed that I wrote so long and asked so many silly long questions, but my film depends on you and how you guide me now…

Thank you very much sir.


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