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Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 88 Export 3: Export Settings 2

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In this tutorial, Andrew Devis goes through and explains many of the options on the right hand side of the Export Settings dialogue box.



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Comments

Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 88 Export 3: Export Settings 2
by Aidan McCarthy
hello Mr.Davis...

I'm a professional broadcast editor working now for 15+ years in Ireland with all manner of NLE but mostly avid and final cut....
I have recently discovered premiere whilst cutting some short dramas all shot on RED..
the workflow is amazing with no transcode and I have really found your tutorials informative, non patronising and really helpful...so thank you for that...

My question is while editing on a 1080p 24 frame proxy seq for offline ( the online will be back to full 4k but for the moment I just need so 1080p viewing copies)...what would be your advice on best export setting for a quick but high resolution viewing copy?? I realise now I should use media encoder and the render queue but I was just wondering if you have any preferences for proxy exports???

thanks in advance and much respect
Aidan Mc
@Aidan McCarthy
by Andrew Devis
Hi Aidan

Thanks for getting in touch, and I'm really pleased that someone of your experience is finding the tutorials helpful.

Proxy workflow is one of those questions that can be addressed in a couple of ways.

Firstly, you can actually transcode for proxy through Adobe Prelude as a possible solution. This will transcode the whole clip but you can be transcoding and copying the originals from your cards through Prelude to your drives at the same time and then work with proxies all the way through to grading and simply swap back for the RED footage in SpeedGrade. Prelude is an Adobe app that is designed for ingest and also allows producers/directors to add notes to clips to help with editing and is worth getting to know.

Secondly, you could also do a similar thing with SpeedGrade in that you copy your files across, run a first pass and export your proxies from SpeedGrade for viewing/editing which has compensated for the raw nature of the RED footage making the actual editing/viewing a little easier as your can bring out more of the shot for viewing.

Thirdly, you could bring the whole thing into Premiere and export from there - but that seems a little bit of a round about process as you end up bringing the proxy back into Premiere ...

My preference is to use SpeedGrade, add a first pass and export the proxy through that. And, (assuming you are on a Mac as you use FCP) I would export a Quicktime file but what I would use would depend on what I needed ... I like image sequences personally (PNG as they are relatively small - but no audio), but an H.264 is quick and easy to use as well and gives reasonable quality (depending on your settings) and has audio.

But, if you are talking about an export of a timeline set up with proxies - then as much as possible I would match the output settings to the proxy settings so as to keep the quality as high as possible but would still probably end up using an H.264 export and do a test to see if I could get away with a Bitrate encoding of CBR, VBR 1 pass or if I still needed VBR 2 pass to keep the quality high enough for the client.

The presets are very helpful at this point and I often start with the YouTube 1080p 25 preset and play with the Target Bitrate and Bitrate Encoding to keep the final file size down. But, play with a small export first and see what's acceptable and then save that as a preset and use if for the rest of the project.

Hope this helps?
All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
Re: Premiere Pro CS6 Techniques: 88 Export 3: Export Settings 2
by Milad Tangshir
Hello Mr. Davis

I have contacted you before, and I have already told you that how important your tutorials are to me and other young and upcoming generations of storytellers. Thank you again!

I have some doubts about exporting my film, which I shot with Canon XHA1 (1440x1080, 25fps).
1. I have shot the film on HDV cassettes, which is MPEG2. Do you think exporting it to MPEG4 (using H.264) is the best decision? (Not using for web, let’s say university screenings and little festivals)

2. Canon XHA1 footage has 25 kbps data rate. So for my main version (not web), I intend to keep the data rate at least 25 kbps. But the file ends up being 9GB!! Which I guess makes it unsafe for playback. What should I do? (The film is 47 minutes)

3. When I uncheck “use previews”, render takes around more than 20 hours! I even did not click render at maximum quality! (Premiere pro 5.5; did the grading with MB Looks; Win7; Intel i7; 8mb Ram)

4. Should I choose “widescreen 16:9” or “square pixel”? Somebody told me that I should change the original 1440x1080 to 1920x1080, for the better and safer playback; is that true?
Thank you very much for your time and energy.

Respect
Milad
@Milad Tangshir
by Andrew Devis
Hi Milad

Good to hear from you again.

HDV is not a broadcastable codec, but a camera codec so you can't export an HDV file for other people to watch so it must be converted to some other format.

HDV uses 1440 x 1080 but the width of the pixels at 1.333 so that the end result is that they display the equivalent of 1920 x 1080. So you should be fine exporting to a codex at 1920 x 1080.

H.264 is an excellent codec and probably the best one to use at the moment and you should choose square pixels if you have the choice - but I suspect that will be the default settings. This is because it is transcoding from your camera codec to the output codec and you can think of it more as if it is converting what you see on your screen to a watchable format and as your screen is the equivalent of 1920 x 1080 because of the pixel aspect ratio - this is what you should choose.

If your timeline is rendered and you haven't played with the quality settings of your sequence previews then use previews as this will save a lot of time (as you already know). But if you have changed your video previews in your sequence settings then you need to render from scratch and that will take quite a while depending on how much you have done to it. Rendering always takes a long time!!

The 'use maximum render quality' checkbox is only for export to a format that is smaller than your original sequence. So you would only use this if say you were creating a smaller web version. You do not use this for full size renders anyway. And so as you are exporting to 1920 x 1080 and your sequence is (effectively) 1920 x 1080 (because of the 1.333 pixel aspect ratio) you don't need to use this.

As for bit rate, I think it would make sense to do a few short export tests of say just 30 seconds of your timeline at various bit rates to see how they look and how the equipment to project them copes with it.

Let me give you a couple of examples. For HD 1920 x 1080 videos on YouTube the bitrate is 8 Mbps. While the bitrate for HD TV (1920 x 1080) is 32 Mbps. Again, you don't need to think about matching the original bit rate of the camera as when you get to output rendering the renderer is kind of looking at your sequence as a 'flattened' project and is asking you 'what quality would you like me to export this to?'

So start with 8 Mbps and then try 15, 22 and 32 and see if the difference in quality is noticable for the size of screen you want to use AND make sure the projector or screen can cope.

For me, I find that the normal windows media player can cope with 32 Mbps if I want. But I would probably go for something lower unless the difference was really noticable. For all web outputs I use the standard 8 Mbps settings for YouTube.

As for the whole widescreen 16:9 thing, you would only be choosing that if you were scaling the production down to standard definition - which I would think would be a mistake (and you would then need to check 'Use maximum render quailty' checkbox if you did that). 1920 x 1080 is widescreen anyway so no need to go for anything else.

Does this help?

Let me know if you need more help.
All the best
Andrew

... because it's all about stories ...
+1
@Andrew Devi
by Milad Tangshir
Mr. Devis

Does this help?!

It was exactly ALL the information that I needed. perfectly explained and comforting.

I can find enough words to thank you.

Respect
Milad


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