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Behind the Lens: Kramer Morgenthau, ASC on Sleepy Hollow

COW Library : TV & Movie Appreciation : Debra Kaufman : Behind the Lens: Kramer Morgenthau, ASC on Sleepy Hollow
CreativeCOW presents Behind the Lens: Kramer Morgenthau, ASC on Sleepy Hollow -- TV & Movie Appreciation Editorial


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I know you shot the pilot for Sleepy Hollow, the new Fox series. How did you get that job?

I got the call from Len Wiseman, one of Sleepy Hollow's executive producers and the director of the pilot. He and I had worked ten years prior on a music video and both of our careers had grown since then. He's gone on to make a lot of very cool, large visual effects pieces like the Underworld series, and also the Total Recall remake. I also recently worked on Thor 2, and he responded to some of the sci-fi, large action set pieces that I've done there. Fracture was another film he responded to the look of, which is film noir type thriller, with Anthony Hopkins and Ryan Gosling.

What did he ask for in terms of the look he wanted for Sleepy Hollow?

I know Len likes to venture into the dark side of photography and the dark side of stories. He likes to exploration of extreme contrasts, darkness and light, expressive lighting with the lack of light and excess of light. He really wanted to push the visual envelope of television, as a totally different type of canvas. Besides literally being a smaller image, TV also has tighter schedules and budgets, and really short turn-around times for post.

For Sleepy Hollow, he wanted to come up with a strong new look, a new take on the Washington Irving short story. He wanted to go a different way than the feature that had been made by Tim Burton, which is a gorgeous piece.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: The headless horseman is resurrected alongside Ichabod Crane in the premiere episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW premiering Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX
The headless horseman was resurrected alongside Ichabod Crane in the premiere episode.


How was the look going to differ from the Tim Burton film?

The Sleepy Hollow that we were looking to create takes place in modern day but has an almost supernatural quality to it. We wanted to do a respectful exploration of the history of the Revolutionary War in the scene we staged. And of course the headless horseman was a big character in the piece.

The writers were Len [Wiseman], Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci and Phil Isacove, who are a prolific team of writers. Alex and Roberto come out of the J.J. Abrams camp; they were looking for a fresh new take on a piece of literature that's been in American libraries for a long time.


How did Len convey the look he wanted? Did he point you to any particular art or movie?

The way Len works is he hands me a 'look bible,' which is a large document filled with images pulled from different places. That is our jumping off point. Sleepy Hollow takes place in both the past and present day Tarrytown, New York. Len has a very exacting eye and a strong aesthetic sense and knows exactly what he's looking for. He uses the camera in very modern, sophisticated ways to transition between the two worlds and make it feel otherworldly or as if something is amiss. It's a combination of near-surrealism and sophistication that he's honed over the years on his features.


What camera and lenses did you end up choosing?

We used the ARRI Alexa on Sleepy Hollow; Panavision was our vendor and they provided some old lenses they've re-housed. We also used these Portrait lenses that have a softness on the edges that we used for the flashback into the Revolutionary War scenes. That softening on the edges was in camera with Portrait lenses.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, pictured) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox
Panavision Portrait lenses brought a softness on the edges to the Revolutionary War flashbacks.


What about camera moves? Did you do anything interesting there?

Len is a very visual director and we did some unusual camera moves that were transitions from one scene to the next, such as tilting the camera and revolving it around 360-degrees until it comes back to a new place. It's a very simple and very effective move that you don't see often. We do that several times to show the character's world is going upside down literally and metaphorically.

In another scene, the camera is attached to the window of the car and the lead actor (who has never seen a car or an electric window) is playing with the window, so the camera is going up and down locked to the window. We use the camera to whimsically support what's going on with the characters. Movies and TV have been around for a century and you think it's all been done before, but Len is constantly thinking outside of the box and it's really fun to work with someone like that.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) in the Revolutionary war, in the premiere episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW premiering Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX


What stands out to you from the pilot?

The Revolutionary War battle sequence isn't something you're going to see every day on episodic TV, as well as really large sweeping night exteriors at the barn where Abby's boss gets killed. There are a number of very cool VFX also. The amount of visual ground we were able to cover in a short time is hard to achieve in a regular schedule, which has half the amount of time we had.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: A Revolutionary-era Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) is resurrected and awakes in present day Sleepy Hollow, in the"Blood Moon" episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW airing Monday, Sept. 23 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Brownie Harris/FOX SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci  comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, pictured) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX SLEEPY HOLLOW: A Revolutionary-era Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) is resurrected and awakes in present day Sleepy Hollow, in the premiere episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW premiering Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX
Kramer sought to explore extreme contrasts, darkness and light, expressive lighting with the lack of light and excess of light.

Tell me a bit about your work in episodic television.

Boardwalk Empire was the first time I'd ever worked in any episodic TV. Before, I'd done over ten pilots, almost all of them picked up, but I've never gone on and worked on the series. Stuart Dryburgh, ASC shot the pilot of Boardwalk Empire. Tim Van Patten, one of the EPs/creators of the show, brought me in; I'd worked on a pilot with him a decade before. He told me that each episode would be done like a feature film. It's great material, a gangster show set in the 1920s, a cinematographer's dream. A premium cable TV show has a lot more time to shoot than network TV. Boardwalk Empire's sets are absolutely gorgeous, the costumes are incredibly with bespoke suits of the period and great colors and fabrics. The stories are really dark and interesting and violent and at the same time it's very poignant commentary on our times today. Boardwalk is a very Machiavellian world, almost like a feudal empire that existed in Atlantic City.


What are the pros and cons of working in TV?

I think that TV today is in a golden age. We're seeing scripts and stories and images created on TV that not only rival feature films in a lot of way but in many ways are much better. To be able to tell the story, keep building the characters and the worlds over multiple years and episodes is creatively a writer's dream I would think. The quality of the writing is really good on Boardwalk and Game of Thrones, another show I've worked on. And the time and the care and the respect for the filmmakers you see at HBO are unparalleled. That's true for other cable channels as well; I just happen to have mostly worked at HBO.

If these kinds of shows were proposed as a film project they might not get made today. They're those adult dramas, serious stories, alternative stories, social-critical stories, the kind made in the 1970s like Parallax View. But all that amazing talent is still out there and a lot of those people are going to cable and HBO to get it made. Network is taking a stab at it, but they have a different audience and a responsibility to advertisers, which cable doesn't have to answer to.



Kramer on the set of THOR: THE DARK WORLD, day 25. Photo by Jay Maidment. © 2012 MVLFFLLC. ™ & © 2012 Marvel. All Rights Reserved.


Tell us a bit about the creation of the look of Boardwalk Empire.

When we first started shooting Boardwalk Empire in 2010, it was 35mm film, Panavision cameras and lenses. It was just [cinematographer] Jonathan Freeman, ASC and I rotating on the show. We studied the pilot and I looked at the dailies Jonathan and Stuart [Dryburgh] had done. I also immersed myself in the paintings referenced, the Ashcan school of painting, a group of artists in New York in the 1920s who painted the underbelly of society. It was a very exciting time. I don't think anybody knew where it would go or how successful it would be, and having Scorsese as our leader was exciting. There were also a lot of alumni from The Sopranos, that pedigree there, great storytelling and filmmaking: very direct, classical style of filmmaking in TV.

I felt very supported and encouraged to go explore darkness, to push expressionistic lighting, which is something I naturally go into. They were very supportive of it and that's not something you see or get from a network where they want things a little more upbeat and reserved. HBO allows you to really push yourself artistically; they've changed the face of television by allowing that kind of expression in this world. We're inundated by images, flashing on 50 types of screens; you have to take a stand and make an image that draws people in.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie, pictured) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX
Kramer leans towards an expressive style of lighting that still feels real.


Do you have a philosophy about lighting?

Most importantly, to support the director's vision. I think that any good cinematographer is capable of lighting a variety of different styles and ways. You draw on what supports the story and the characters and the look and feel of the world you're in. it's fun for us to visit these worlds and create these worlds from scratch. That being said, I think every cinematographer does lean towards something, and I lean towards an expressive style of lighting that I would like to think still feels real – like you're in a real environment but at the same time it has a poetic quality to it that is harmonizing with the story or what the characters are going through in the scene.

I do tend to like tungsten lighting. The large instruments allow you to use single sources, which is more naturalistic than a whole bunch of little lights going in many directions. I like tungsten because it's full spectrum light and the skin tones are very pleasing. It's probably considered an old-fashioned light in today's world because there are so many alternative technology fluorescent and LED lights. I do use them and they have an appropriate place, such as in built-in lighting or areas hard to access like cars. I love LEDs but they wouldn't be my first choice on a face. Skin tones and color spectrum are more limited with LEDs.


SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci  comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, R) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie, L) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Brownie Harris/FOX


Other lights I really like are Vari-Lites or Intellabeams, which are adapted from theatre and rock'n'roll. You can program any kind of movement, and there are infinite variables of beams optics and colors. Those are really great, especially in large sets, again, probably for a more sci-fi or futuristic story. But they can fit anywhere and they're really lovely lights. My favorite light is a Clay Paky Sharpy, an Italian moving light that's only 200 watts, but has incredible optics that allows the sharpest, cleanest straightest beam. I used this on Thor 2.


What inspires you to take on a project?

What moves me or attracts me to projects are definitely what it is we're shooting and not so much what we're shooting with. It's the scripts that get me excited first and foremost. Then it's the people you're with – the directors, producers, actors, production designer, costume designer, VFX. The collaboration can be very intense and it's sometimes long period you're working together so you want to know you're surrounded by good people and the story you're telling, the universe you're creating is something you believe in and want to wake up every morning at 5 AM and do.

I really love what I do and I feel blessed to be able to do it. But I need to be excited about the material itself. I used to be excited by anyone who let me have a 35mm camera. Add some lights and a crew and I was so psyched I'd do anything. Now it's more, what are we shooting? What's the story? What part of the world are we shooting in? Most important is the story. I don't care about what kind of camera it is – within reason. I'd rather do something I'm passionate about with less stuff than something with all the bells and whistles but creatively shallower.





Revolutionary Shooting: Making The War | SLEEPY HOLLOW | FOX BROADCASTING


Kramer Morgenthau, ASC


Kramer Morgenthau ASC has traveled the globe shooting over twenty feature films and numerous television, documentary and commercial assignments.

His recent feature projects include Thor: The Dark World with director Alan Taylor, Chef with director Jon Favreau, Feast of Love with three-time Academy Award winning director Robert Benton, and Fracture with director Gregory Hoblit.

In the world of television, Morgenthau has been nominated for 5 Emmy awards and 4 ASC awards.

He recently shot Game of Thrones (HBO) for which he won an Outstanding Achievement Award in Cinematography by the American Society of Cinematographers. He also shot and was nominated for Emmy Awards for Boardwalk Empire (HBO), Too Big To Fail (HBO), Flash Forward (ABC), and Life on Mars (ABC). In 2011 Morgenthau was named one of 10 Cinematographers to watch by Variety magazine.

Morgenthau grew up in Cambridge MA, and was introduced to the world of documentary film by his father Henry Morgenthau who produced documentaries for flagship PBS station WGBH in Boston. Morgenthau is a member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, The American Society of Cinematographers, The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences and the International Cinematographers Guild.

 





The Emmy name and the Emmy statuette are the trademarked property of The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences ("Television Academy") and the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences ("National Academy")

Photo credits:
SLEEPY HOLLOW: The headless horseman is resurrected alongside Ichabod Crane in the premiere episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW premiering Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX

SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, R) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie, L) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Brownie Harris/FOX

SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, pictured) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox

SLEEPY HOLLOW: A Revolutionary-era Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) is resurrected and awakes in present day Sleepy Hollow, in the"Blood Moon" episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW airing Monday, Sept. 23 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Brownie Harris/FOX

SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, pictured) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX

SLEEPY HOLLOW: A Revolutionary-era Ichabod Crane (Tom Mison) is resurrected and awakes in present day Sleepy Hollow, in the premiere episode of SLEEPY HOLLOW premiering Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX

Kramer on the set of THOR: THE DARK WORLD, day 25. Photo by Jay Maidment. © 2012 MVLFFLLC. ™ & © 2012 Marvel. All Rights Reserved.

SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie, pictured) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Kent Smith/FOX

SLEEPY HOLLOW: From co-creators/executive producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci comes the adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW. In this modern-day retelling of Washington Irving’s classic, ICHABOD CRANE (Tom Mison, R) is resurrected and pulled two and a half centuries through time to find that the world is on the brink of destruction and that he is humanity’s last hope, forcing him to team up with a contemporary police officer (Nicole Beharie, L) to unravel a mystery that dates back to the founding fathers. The adventure thriller SLEEPY HOLLOW premieres Monday, Sept. 16 (9:00-10:00 PM ET/PT) on FOX. ©2013 Fox Broadcasting Co. CR: Brownie Harris/FOX




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