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Women In Post Join Forces

CreativeCOW presents Women In Post Join Forces -- Business & Marketing Editorial


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Women have notably been a minority in film/TV, and especially in post production and other technical fields. I began my career working in post houses in Los Angeles and New York, and when I switched to writing about the industry, in 1989, I discovered just how few of us there were. Whether it was a press conference at NAB or another technical conferences and meetings, I was often the only woman in the room.

Times have changed, but female participation on the technical side, especially in the higher echelons, is still not very robust. I used to sit in at the HPA Tech Retreat and count how few women were in attendance, especially as speakers. Apparently, I haven't been the only one wondering where all the women are.


Above, Max Ma, Alicia Rock and (right) Eileen Kramer

Above left, Kari Grubin
Above right, Loren Nielsen




"This has been something on the HPA's radar for a little while," says HPA Executive Director Eileen Kramer. NSS Labs Sales Director, Entertainment Sector, Kari Grubin, who is Chair of the WIP committee and has been a member of HPA for over a decade, notes that she has often had conversations with women at the Tech Retreats about how the majority of people attending were men. "Only a small core of women attended, although we knew there were a lot more women out there in technical positions, with influential roles in technology and post," she says.

Also joining in the conversation was Entertainment Technology Consultants president/co-founder Loren Nielsen; and Otis College of Art & Design Assistant Chair, Digital Media, Kathleen Milnes. They called a meeting of all women at the 2013 HPA Tech Retreat. "Almost all the 35 women in attendance at the HPA Tech Retreat were there," says Grubin. "We were 7 percent of the approximate 500 attendees. It was really important to the four of us to see what was important to other women within the group to promote."

For Nielsen, a member of the HPA board, a women's group was something she had wanted to do for a long time. "I wanted to encourage more women to have a face in post, in particular," she says. "It bothers me when I go to these events and there are no women speaking -- or just one. We need more women leaders in post." So when Grubin asked Nielsen if she thought the HPA's Board would be interested, her response was unequivocal. "I said, absolutely, let me bring it to the board," she says. As she predicted, the HPA Board unanimously met the idea with enthusiasm. "The board absolutely wanted to support this request for an opportunity for women to gather knowledge and information within their own group," says Kramer. "It was an idea that had to evolve and come into being in its own time."

Once the board approved the idea, shortly after the 2013 Tech Retreat, the four members began planning their next move. "We started brainstorming," says Kramer. "We wanted to do something that was casual, comfortable and conversational." Milnes suggested the idea of a series of roundtables, in which four or five women leaders would make the rounds of tables filled with WIP attendees, telling their stories and answering questions. "The opportunity for one-on-one time seems to have resonated to women attending this event," says Kramer. "We have speakers at every table to engage with, but it's also the opportunity to get to know everyone else around the table. It radiates out, in a nice, easy way."

At the first roundtable, on June 20, "The Path to Leadership" included Sara Duran Singer, Chief Executive Officer, Todd/Soundelux; Maysie Hoy, A.C.E.; Beverly Wood, Vice President of Technical Services, Deluxe and Efilm; and Jane Swearingen, Vice President of Marketing at Slate Media Group. "We took four women in leadership positions and asked them to tell their stories about how they came into their careers, the struggles they faced and what they see for the future," says Grubin. "The feedback was fantastic."

The second roundtable -- "The Content Filled Life (Cycle)" -- featured an equally impressive group of speakers: director and cinematographer Anna Foerster who is a member of both ASC and the DGA; Disney Studios Vice President, Post Production Technology, Annie Chang; Lone Survivor Co-Producer/VFX Producer and Post Production Supervisor Petra Holtorf-Stratton; Modern VideoFilm Digital Intermediate Colorist Natasha Leonnet (Sin City: A Dame to Kill For) and 10-time Academy Award nominated Sound Mixer Anna Behlmer. To say the roundtables have been enthusiastically greeted is an understatement: they quickly sold-out as soon as tickets went online. By this point, MTI Film Director of International Business Development Belinda Merritt joined the WIP committee.

Nielsen notes that the comfortable feeling of camaraderie found in a group of women is ideal for sharing experience and knowledge. "I think that applies across all levels of women in post," she says. "We're also interested in reaching out to younger women and sharing our experiences with them, but, honestly, this industry is changing so fast it's hard to keep up -- and I'm happy to learn too. The educational aspect is good for all of us."

According to Grubin, WIP is planning another roundtable event for October "As a group, we're still defining what we want the group to accomplish," adds Nielsen, who points out that WIP is ideal for mid-career women as well as those just starting their careers. "As our members help communicate what they're looking for, that will be refined." One of her specific goals is to "help find ways for more women to become leaders in the post industry and to have a higher profile in the post industry, whether it's articles and speaking engagements and jobs, or board memberships. "There will be lots of different things to help develop women into those roles, including industry mentoring," she says. "Part of that is to provide a platform, which we hope to do with WIP."

That includes continuing to ask some of the questions -- and seek answers -- to why women in post continue to exist in small numbers. "Why is it that more young women aren't getting into the technical side of the business?" asks Grubin. "There are a lot more women in sales or operational leadership, but not as many pursuing a career in technology. People paved the road for me, so it's our responsibility to this generation to pave the road for them."

Interested in joining? "Readers not in Los Angeles should join the LinkedIn group Women in Post," says Kramer. The more women who join up, the more voices will be heard. I became a member at that first meeting at the HPA Tech Retreat, and I encourage you to get involved. Let's see if we can take this group to the next level, and make a difference in terms of women's representation in film/TV technology.







Comments

@Women In Post Join Forces
by Sandeep Sajeev
If you're a guy who thinks that a qualified prospective hire isn't going to be up to the job simply because she's a woman, you're an ass.

But there are other issues that may give one pause: I'm a man and I run a small company with my business partner - a woman. We bring on board freelancers for all commercial shoots, and there are times where it's difficult for us to hire a woman. If we have to worry about how to get her to a deserted location at 3 am, and keep her safe, we're more likely to just hire a guy and save ourselves the stress of worrying about the possibility of horrible things happening.

When we hire out for Post, we don't have to worry about it at all, and we just hire the best person for the job. And there always more women editors and designers that apply than men.

So I am surprised at the numbers quoted in this article and the other one posted in the comments. They make it seem like it's a barren desert with the occasional female technician struggling to make her way to the nearest oasis.

I don't see that being the case in Asia, not just India, I've flown out to various parts of the continent on jobs and there are a lot of women involved both in production and post. I've never counted, but I've never felt that there have been significantly less women than men either on set, or on the Agency side, or in the Post house(s).

I'm also a bit bemused at lines like this:

Nielsen notes that the comfortable feeling of camaraderie found in a group of women is ideal for sharing experience and knowledge.

That just strikes me as ridiculous. I'd expect to hear that statement on Mad Men, but from a working professional today? It just seems off. I mean you can extrapolate this sentiment all the way out of the desert and settle down for a nap under a palm tree by an oasis, as a racist.

As for the closing statement that they want to encourage more young women to get into post - I think these young women are on to something - they're all becoming Directors and Producers and Creative Directors, and that's where the money and the power is. Good for them, why stay in post and deal with everyone else's shit when you can call the shots?

Sandeep.
@Women In Post Join Forces
by Christopher S. Johnson
Hi. A quick anecdote. I'm a 15 year male documentary editor. At least half of the editors, or more, I encounter are women (in California). It's something I often communicate to to others outside of the industry as a point of pride. I'm sure there are many areas of many industries where we need to be very vigilant on sexual equality and I'm with you on that, but the documentary edit room doesn't seem to be one of them.

And it seems that most times I want to look up a feature film editor or cable drama editor i'm interested in, it turns out to be a woman more often than not. Case in point, Kelley Dixon on Breaking Bad and Shameless.

@Christopher S. Johnson
by Debra Kaufman
Women editors have played a role throughout Hollywood's film history, at least to some extent. I used to cover "women in entertainment" for The Hollywood Reporter for many, many years, and there is nothing even close to parity when it comes to directing and cinematography.
+1
@Christopher S. Johnson
by Debra Kaufman
Sorry - that response was a tad incoherent - It's late! What I meant to say regarding the Women in Entertainment coverage I used to do for THR, is that there was a lot of conversation (and has been for years) among the women in Hollywood on how to achieve more parity in the director's seat. A couple of academic research papers have been written on the glass ceiling there. The ASC has added quite a number of female DPs since I started covering the industry in the late 1980s.
+1
Re: @Christopher S. Johnson
by Mark Suszko
This link offered without comment.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2013/09/11/220748057/why-women-like-me-choos...
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Kylee Peña
Another interesting story that goes along with the idea of people not noticing this is a problem, from NPR's report about women in Hollywood:

"We just heard a fascinating and disturbing study, where they looked at the ratio of men and women in groups. And they found that if there's 17 percent women, the men in the group think it's 50-50. And if there's 33 percent women, the men perceive that as there being more women in the room than men."

That's from Geena Davis, who founded the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media. They didn't appear to cite the study she mentioned and we're getting out of hard stats into theory, but I thought it was interesting enough to bring to this discussion.

The full story is very good.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
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Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Bob Zelin
I did not read the Geena Davis study. But let me blindly use my ignorance to make this statement - there is no shortage of women actors, dancers, wardrobe, makeup, set design, writers, producers, directors, etc. (etc. means NON technical positions). So what does the study indicate about women not wanting to persue technical positions in our industry. Where is the horrible prejudice towards women in technical positions, where there is no prejudice in the same industry (in positions where women control the entire production) ? I see film makers like Spike Lee trying to use black DP's and editors, and other crew members - how come women producers are not using women crew members - ooh ! I know why - there are almost none that exist ! (or have any interest).

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
maxavid@cfl.rr.com
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Mark Suszko
And yet J.J. Abrams' last Trek movie, as Debra's article pointed out, was edited by a 2-woman team. I didn't care much for the movie, but it wasn't the fault of the editors. About 2/3 of my clients are women, BTW.

I think on the micro scale, small shops try harder to be open to fair hiring based on the reel, and not anything else. As the companies get bigger, it gets harder to break in, no matter what your gender or background, and you rely ever more heavily on contacts and networking. Overall, the business has a glut of editors today, and more pouring out of schools and basements weekly, depressing earnings rates and making the competition greater than ever. That throws the gender gap into higher relief.

I'm sure there are actual women lurking, reading this thread but not wanting to comment, for some reason. Kylie can't be that alone. I wish they would just get in here and set us straight, from their actual perspective. We men can theorize all day, but personally I'd rather cut to the chase and just hear the women's side of things, and maybe we can move things forward a little bit.
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Debra Kaufman
I've been reading all the interesting comments that this article has generated from out of town. Now that I'm back, I can finally respond. First, my article wasn't intended to shed light on why there aren't more women on the technology side of the industry -- it was merely to report that a group of women within the Hollywood Post Alliance have started a group to network and mentor women coming up in the industry.

I think WHY more women aren't drawn to careers on the technology side of the film/TV industry is a complex topic, and related to the fact that women aren't represented in great number in most science/technology fields. To digress for a moment, I used to be an editor for the Journal of Symbolic Logic, and worked for a Professor of Mathematics at UCLA as his copy editor. He was very interested in the topic of why there were so few women grad students in math and had done a lot of research in it. What he found was that, prior to puberty, girls showed superior skills and interest in math than boys. What happened at puberty? Girls got the message that that math was a masculine topic and that they should not excel at it.

In so many ways, girls get the message not to joyfully embrace their intellectual skills, as boys prefer girls who are not superior to them intellectually. I think there are a range of more "girly" topics where it's OK for women to excel, but math and science has been pretty much a male preserve. It's extremely difficult to counter strong cultural beliefs -- gosh, all you have to do is look at a magazine aimed at teenaged girls to see the messages that inculcate and reflect these cultural trends.

Women actually IN the field are extremely aware of how isolated they are -- as I mention in the article, I was very often the only woman in the room (and, in the old days, broadcast gear was often demonstrated with videos that can only be described as soft porn). Although men individually may welcome women into the field, it's something that's bigger than individuals. I think that more than ever before young women feel fewer barriers to entry, but these cultural barriers haven't disappeared.

Right now I doubt there is a single woman in the tech side of our industry who can't relate to this topic - and that reality speaks a truth that just can't be denied. Guys who read this and are appalled -- all I can say is, bring your daughter to YOUR work and encourage her to excel in math and science. I admired my dad (an engineer) tremendously but he actually discouraged me from becoming a ham radio operator or improving my math skills. So there you go...each of us, as individuals, did not create this cultural force, but we do, as individuals, have the ability to try to counter it. Groups of individuals have influence. Hence the creation of Women in Post. I encourage more discussion on the topic!!
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Andrew Rendell
[Debra Kaufman] "Guys who read this and are appalled" - yep, that would be me.

I'm looking across the pond from the UK, and I recognize the same thing over here. In the sector I work in there is a reasonably even split between the sexes overall (in the team I was part of during august there were usually 2 men and 3 women around the edit suite including me and that isn't unusual), women are very much a minority on the technical side still over here. I know several editors who are women and a couple of cameramen who are women and they are among the best but it has to be said that they're very much in the minority.

I don't know exactly why they are in small numbers, IMO there is nothing in editing that would give either sex an advantage, in fact, apart from a necessary technical grounding, editing is primarily a craft of making value judgements and balancing conflicting requirements, not essentially "masculine" skills.

My daughter wants to follow me into TV (I have taken her in to work with me many times), not necessarily editing but at 18 she's still too young to know what positions will suit her personality best. I did a guest lecture to her class and was very pleased to see an even split between sexes there, and I'm seeing another young woman with a year to go on her degree course next week. But I think that encouragement from people like me can only really scratch the surface of what is, despite some gains over the last half-century, still a problem with society at large.

I agree with the sentiment in this:

[Debra Kaufman] "...girls get the message not to joyfully embrace their intellectual skills, as boys prefer girls who are not superior to them intellectually... look at a magazine aimed at teenaged girls to see the messages that inculcate and reflect these cultural trends. "

Yeah, that pisses me off enormously. My wife is one of the most intelligent people I know and it still (after 20 years of marriage) irritates me when she hides her brightness out of habit. For me smart IS sexy. But it's more of a worry now how it effects our daughter, she was put off science/logic too early in her schooling IMO, but she has become a multi-instrumentalist and has no trouble with the technical aspects of my work so I'm convinced that's the social construct at work rather than her innate ability.
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Tim Wilson
[Andrew Rendell] " I did a guest lecture to her class and was very pleased to see an even split between sexes there, and I'm seeing another young woman with a year to go on her degree course next week. But I think that encouragement from people like me can only really scratch the surface of what is, despite some gains over the last half-century, still a problem with society at large."

Well said. Entirely agreed for both society at large, and this industry included.

You note an even split in guest lectures -- this is what I've often found in the US as well. So why is the percentage of women going down? Walter Murch's answer may be as close as we get, that as editing becomes perceived as more technical, women are subconsciously seen as less capable. I'd add shooting to that too -- as it becomes perceived as more technical, there's little prospect for women to rise above the low single digits of percent where they've hovered for years.

I don't know of anyone who consciously believes this, which is why it will take a conscious effort to address. Because you're absolutely right, there's nothing "innate" to make one gender or another better suited to the work.

Something similar has been happening in women's athletics. Things are going better than ever for women athletes - the US Olympic team last year had more women than men. Only 16,000 women were playing college sports before the advent of Title IX in 1971. Now it's over 200,000 -- but the percentage of women coaches has gone down from 90% to 43% in the same span. Insight gained from research probably lines up with your gut instinct: as women's athletics have become bigger business, it has been seen as more important for men to be in charge. You can read more about all this here.

My other concern for filmmakers is that one area where women are making strides is indie documentaries. On one hand, this is great. We need more of these from both women and men. But I fear that documentaries, especially ones focused on things perceived as "women's issues" can become a kind of ghetto, too. "Look at all the women in indie docs! There's obviously no problem with women's jobs that any woman with a Handycam can't solve herself." Both true, and not true at all.

Thanks again, Andrew. Good luck to your daughter. :-)
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Bob Zelin
I am getting to really hate this entire thread. I know (and have known) plenty of women that are talented, and actively working, making the same money or more than any man that I know doing the equivalent job. They don't ask for excuses, they don't ask for sympathy, they do the job, they do it wonderfully, and they make plenty of money, and there is no prejudice.

Example - Grace Machado - senior editor Disney Public Relations
Example - Amber Larkin, owner Nth Degree Design & Visual FX

and I have know plenty of women who were equally qualified, equally paid, well liked, and JUST GAVE UP (I knew one female editor that went to nursing school - why ? - and countless that never returned to work after getting pregnant).

I was having this conversation today at a client, with all guys in their late 20's and early 30's. They all HATE the fact that it's almost all guys, and they WANT girls to be working there. SO WHERE ARE THE GIRLS ?

I see the same thing in music - not little cute singers, but incredible talented musicians. Who kick butt, and get opportunities - like
Lizzy Hale (Halestorm)
or Orianthi - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orianthi

I don't see these women looking at the music industry as a "boys club". And on YouTube, you see lots of incredibly talented female musicians - so WHERE ARE THEY in the work force ? Are you saying that it's a boys club, and they are not given the opportunity.
I certainly don't agree. It may be cultural, but ultimately I blame women themselves for not taking the opportunity.

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
maxavid@cfl.rr.com
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Mark Suszko
I think there are probably more women editors in the biz than we know, but they don't always seek to stand out, preferring to let their work do the talking. If you watch the terrific presentation by AFI, women have been cutting film since the very beginning of the industry, back when it was considered "women's work". As to why we don't see them in the field in equal numbers to men, I can't say.

A similar thing is happening in architecture, where women architects are just now getting equal consideration in the big design award contests, and getting called architects themselves, versus being thought of as only assistants to/partners of male architects.

I DO know more efforts have been made in the past few years to get young girls into STEM type programs, which is good for all tech industries, not just ours. I've always tried to do my part during my career, to encourage our female interns and facility tour members, to consider the different work available in our industry "behind the scenes". One of our interns is a TV news director now.

Women always have it harder than we do, since they are the ones presented with a choice to maximize a career, or walk away from the high point of their careers to take a several-years-long break for raising a family, and then they have to re-enter the work force years behind and having to prove themselves all over again. That's never been fair, and they face it in every line of work. And statistically, in a down economy with more and more competition, their relative small numbers in our field will be lucky to stay flat, rather than go down. I'm sure there are plenty of examples of female editors who managed to work and raise kids at the same time. I know it's not impossible. I'm saying most married men don't face the same struggle; society expects them to stay on the job full-time and be the principle bread-winner. We had this same debate in our own home. In our case, it was purely a numbers decision: we agreed whoever made less money would stay home and raise the kids. We decided to make do with less and live on a single income. She put her art career on hold and raised OUR kids, rather than continuing to work and pouring most of the second income into paying other people to raise our children. Nobody else is EVER going to do that job better then the actual parents, and it's the most important job of your life. Now the kids are mostly grown and she's slowly re-integrating into the market, but that's always tough. Yet, for us, personally, we believe it was in the best long-term interests of ALL our family.

Outside of mandatory job-retention guarantees as part of the family leave act, (which the industry would certainly fight tooth and nail), what else CAN be done to level the playing field? I'd be interested to know. I have a daughter, and though she's unlikely to follow her dad's particular career path, as any father would say, I too would go to any length to give her the same shot at at whatever career she wants, as the next person.

What IS the "answer"?
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Bill Davis
[Mark Suszko] "What IS the "answer"?"

I think that kinda presumes there's "an" answer. And I don't think it's ever that simple.

Looked at over the long scope of history - this era is amazingly better for women (in general) than through out most of history. Not always, and certainly not everywhere - but in general at least in the developed countries like the US we've moved well beyond women being seen as largely as "property"

But it also reminds me of the way last weeks 50th anniversary of the March on Washington pointed out that while having a President with an African American identity is a massive step forward in racial competence and equality perception - even that doesn't necessarily change the whole deal for the average minority person in real life.

Similarly, even tho there are wonderfully more images of competent and high performing women in our culture, you've got to worry about whether that's just more (and more visible) outliers - rather than systemic changes.

Oddly, earlier this afternoon, I was with my wife in the studio doing an on-line voice talent search for a female voice to do part of a spot campaign we're working on for a client. So I listened to about 50 voice demos of women. I'd say at best - 15% of them had the VO chops to make our final cut.

And it wasn't training or inate talent. It was largely just a lack of developed voice muscles. Most of the women talent sounded like they did VO work part time - relying on lung power and acting chops - rather than having the "sound" of someone who had developed the diaphragm musculature over time to properly support their voice in a recording studio situation. It's the "been there and done this 400 times" thing that often makes the difference between any rookie and any pro.

And how are more women going to get that experience and become really good if we aren't hiring them and developing them on one hand. But on the other, how can we expect producers in a global market to be content with hiring less than fully developed talent to do anything - when there's a world of possibilities as close as your computer?

That's a hugely tough question.

I just wish I had better answers.

Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com - video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Bob Zelin
Hi again -
this is an example of a true industry leader. This is
Mary Gruszka, who knows more about audio engineering than anyone I have ever met in my life. Why did she stick it out, and almost no other woman does ?

http://www.tvtechnology.com/audio-by-design/0174/implementing-calm-rules-du...

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
maxavid@cfl.rr.com
Not @Bob Zelin, but hey, I gotta start somewhere
by Tim Wilson
Bob, you wrote: "Why did she stick it out, and almost no other woman does?"

Because THAT's the problem, Bob. Women quit too easily. Too weak. Too easily distracted by babies. They. Just. Don't. Have. What. It. Takes.

C'mon Bob. I know you don't believe it, so why are you saying it? Exceptions will always exist, but in general, things are the way the are because people in power WANT them to be that way.

I'm working on article to address this in broader terms, chock full o' links for you to evaluate yourself, with information that I think will shock you, but to make it simple: the number of women working in this industry will go up when more men hire more women.

Walter Murch has suggested that the declining percentage of women in feature editing (and it IS declining) is because, as editing is seen as becoming more technical, women are less likely to be hired.

Could be. I don't know. But I DO know the solution to more women in these kinds of jobs. More women getting hired.

Look, maybe as you think about this, dear reader, you think it's not your problem...or that there's no problem at all. Fine. It's your money. Do whatever you want with it. I'm not talking to you or about you. I'm ONLY talking to and about men who say they WANT to do something about it.

Maybe you don't have a job or internship to offer -- but if you do, maybe consider soliciting an application from a woman if you're not getting any. Or if you're getting one application, look for two. IF SHE'S NOT RIGHT FOR THE JOB, DON'T HIRE HER. But it's not going to "hurt" a man's chances for you to consider at least one woman in addition to the many men you'll consider.

Maybe mentor a girl in a local high school.

Maybe encourage men you know in hiring positions to see if their hiring practices align with what they think is the right thing to do, rather than continue unconscious behaviors that don't. Because I think that when they think about it, most men in hiring positions will agree that it's worth taking a few minutes to put another application from a woman somewhere in the stack, to be hired OR NOT HIRED. Just considered.

OR DO SOMETHING ELSE. PICK ANYTHING.

As always, virtually every word I speak in the COW is for myself only, and should not be taken as in any way reflecting the opinions of my employer.

But if you think this should change, you CAN do something to change it. So do it.
+2
Re: Women In Post Join Forces
by Bob Zelin
Hi Debra -
I have written an aggressive response to Kylee Wall on Creative Cow about this very same subject. While I love and read all of your articles on Creative Cow, this particular article reminds me of countless "web" articles on MSNBC and Yahoo - it says nothing, and answers nothing. Specifically (to quote your article) -
"That includes continuing to ask some of the questions -- and seek answers -- to why women in post continue to exist in small numbers. "Why is it that more young women aren't getting into the technical side of the business?" asks Grubin. "There are a lot more women in sales or operational leadership, but not as many pursuing a career in technology."

Well WHY ? Why do hardly any women persue this ? Is it cultural ? I know women that are the BEST editors, audio people, engineers, but they are few and far between, and I have NEVER EVER seen prejudice as to giving them opportunities because of a "boys club" environment at any facility. I would like to have seen at least one partial explanation from you, or someone you interviewed as to WHY there are so few women in this field in our industry.

Bob Zelin

Bob Zelin
Rescue 1, Inc.
maxavid@cfl.rr.com
@Bob Zelin
by Kylee Peña
Why are that fewer women in the industry, you ask?

You answer your own question: you've never seen women treated differently. I think that's a large part of why there aren't as many women in our field. Women ARE treated differently. Men are in power. Men don't see this, because they are men and it's not blatant like a Mad Men episode where some gal gets a smack on the bum or a lewd comment. Men are in power. Men don't see a problem, men don't try to solve the problem. What problem? There is no problem.

In a Center for American Progress poll, a majority of men surveyed believe "the country has made most of the changes needed to give women equal rights as men."

A research note by a Columbia Law school student found that more than half of Fortune 50 companies are failing to meet the SEC's diversity requirements. And that's after the SEC passed guidelines addressing the matter three years ago.

So most men think the country has made the changes needed to give women a fair shake, yet women are paid considerably less (40-80 cents on the dollar depending on what data you think is most accurate), are discriminated against more often (1 in 4, more often higher up the food chain), and aren't even on the radar of over half of the biggest companies in the country?

And if it's like that in the biggest companies under the greatest amount of hiring scrutiny, how is it for all the women who are employed by or would like to be employed by much smaller companies as is common in our industry?

There's a lot of stuff we could talk about: societal, political, cultural, traditional, economical, psychological. And I look forward to that. There are a lot of reasons (maybe) why it's become this way. But it stays this way because YOU let it. The collective you, not you personally. The you includes me too. It includes a lot of women, which makes outreach and groups like the one Debra wrote about even more important than you think.

(I think all the stats I have are from this well-timed article, which you should read.)

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com


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12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish I'd Known at 25

12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish I'd Known at 25

12 Things I Know About Business at 55 That I Wish Id Known at 25 appeared in Creative COW Magazine and was one of our most popular articles. It is a true timeless classic in which COW leader, contributing editor, and Senior Business Adviser to Creative COW, Nick Griffin shares wisdom he's learned the hard way in over 30 years in business. His experience will help you to avoid mistakes, manage clients, and prepare yourself to achieve your greatest success.

Editorial, Feature, Business
Nick Griffin
Business & Marketing
How TV Spot Strategies Come Into Being

How TV Spot Strategies Come Into Being

Nick Griffin has worked with a wide range of clients both national and international. He has worked in a wide range of capacities for his clients and he is successful because he knows how to listen and how to function as a part of a team, even when he's the guy with all the responsibility. In this article he shares some of the basics of building a successful strategy from which strong campaigns can be built.


Nick Griffin
Business & Marketing
Seven Ways to Make Your Own Luck in The Film Industry

Seven Ways to Make Your Own Luck in The Film Industry

HBO Director of Workflow, post-house founder, owner of the first two RED cameras, founder and developer of Endcrawl, technologist, futurist, educator, and more: John 'Pliny' Eremic, is regularly asked for career advice in the field of filmmaking. Step One, he says, is to consider a new job. There's much more of course, delivered with Pliny's peerless wit, directness, and insight. Whether you're just starting in the business, or looking to break through to the next level, you won't want to miss this guide to making your own luck.

Feature
John 'Pliny' Eremic
Business & Marketing
Creative COW Turns 15! A Celebration of Being Uncool

Creative COW Turns 15! A Celebration of Being Uncool

15 years is a long time on the internet! Travel back with us to the days before YouTube, social media, digital cinema, smartphones, iPods and all the rest, back to the founding of Creative COW by Ronald & Kathlyn Lindeboom in April 2001. Join us for an insider's look at the earliest days of the professional digital video revolution, all the way through the events that have shaped the world's largest community of media professionals, right here at Creative COW.

Editorial, Feature
Tim Wilson
Business & Marketing
7 Customer Service Rules for Better Post Production

7 Customer Service Rules for Better Post Production

Dealing with people is industry-agnostic, but in an industry as competitive as ours, repeat business is everything -- and your clients are more likely to return to you if your customer service skills are great. Here are some customer service tips that are especially helpful for post production.

Feature
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
An Odd Delight: A Corporate Editor's Leap Into Broadcast

An Odd Delight: A Corporate Editor's Leap Into Broadcast

Creative COW Contributing Editor Kylee Wall moved from Indianapolis to Atlanta as part of a move from corporate video into broadcast. Sure, some things stayed the same, but so much more was so different -- a new place to live, a new kind of workspace, new kinds of projects, AND TAPE -- that transitioning to a new NLE in Adobe Premiere Creative Cloud was the least of it. Certainly nothing compared to a fever of 104 that took her out for most of her first week. It's a remarkable tale that Kylee tells as only she can.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
Suck It Up, Buttercup

Suck It Up, Buttercup

The Best Excuses from New or Underemployed Filmmakers and Freelancers: "You've really really got to stop being lazy and making excuses for not getting what you want," says Creative COW Contributing Editor Kylee Wall. "Seriously. It's sad and it makes me sad for you. So sad in fact, that I've created this BEST OF compilation of stupid excuses. It's perhaps a little more brash than my usual fare. Don't mistake this for arrogance. I'm young and stupid too, but I'm still allowed to almost rant. Pseudo-rant. Pretend I made you cookies and you're eating them as you read this."

Editorial, Feature
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
Get Hired! Be Professional and Pay Attention to Detail

Get Hired! Be Professional and Pay Attention to Detail

"As technology gets better, communications skills seem to get worse." So says Creative COW leader and Contributing Editor Walter Biscardi, one of the industry's most respected business owners. "The same talented people who can create amazing things on screen have absolutely no idea how to represent themselves via a resume or online demo. Most of what I'm about to say seems to be common sense, but apparently it isn't." You definitely don't want to miss this potentially career-changing advice from an industry luminary!

Editorial, Feature
Walter Biscardi
Business & Marketing
The Heroism of Joyful Creativity

The Heroism of Joyful Creativity

I'm constantly inspired by the pleasure and the pride that the people in Creative COW Magazine take in doing the right things the right way, in always trying to improve, and always keeping their eyes peeled for new possibilities. I aspire to do my own work as creatively and joyfully as they do.

Editorial
Tim Wilson
Business & Marketing
Promote Your Company Worldwide, FREE.

Promote Your Company Worldwide, FREE.

Creative COW's Services Offered Directory is a Powerful Free Resource for Your Business.

Editorial
Ronald Lindeboom
MORE
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