LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

No-Cost Ways to Increase Business

CreativeCOW presents No-Cost Ways to Increase Business -- Business & Marketing Editorial


CreativeCOW.net
Paso Robles California USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


In this article, Creative COW's Ron Lindeboom outlines time-tested and near no-cost ways in which even the smallest businesses -- or large successful ones -- can expand marketshare and increase their client base. The old saying is that ''Successful people do what unsuccessful people will not do.'' Here are some of the things that successful people do...



The techniques are no secret, yet most businesses never take advantage of some of the most tried-and-true, yet cheapest, methods of building the business and adding regular sales and new clients to their business.

What is this not-so-secret secret that costs so little and yet is proven to return so much? It's based on the simple interaction with those customers that you already have. Another word for it is "follow-up," and it's something that many people fail to do, never realizing the goldmine that they pass up by doing so. But those who practice regular follow up, will tell you that many of their best clients have come from it...

Why? Because a client referred to you by one of their firends, is rarely going to elicit the kinds of reactions and realistic and sensible suspicions about you as they ascertain your ability to meet their needs and expectations. But based on the word and endorsement of their friend, you are now placed in the "inner circle" of their basic sense of trust. As long as you do not do anything which violates this trust, you have the inside track in the race for their business.

SUCCESSFUL FOLLOW-UP:
Follow-up is really a very simple process and takes but a few minutes from your day. Some businesses I have talked with over the years, treat customers as if they were an intrusion on their day. The best businesses realize they are the very reason for that business's existence. They treat their clients the way that they would like to be treated and it's this mutual air of respect that opens the door to referrals.

Referrals can happen anytime and are often the outgrowth of simple conversations that you are having with a client with whom you just completed a job. You call them the day after delivery just to thank them again for their business and to make sure that all is going well. During the course of the conversation, a simple question like "Bob, do you know anyone of your associates who might be in need of my services?" You would be surprised at how many deals are done like this.

Referrals also mean that the dreaded "Cold Call Monster" is kept at bay for another day. When cultivating business by following up on referrals given you, the one receiving your call is much more likely to accept it and talk with you when you can tell the person answering that "[Their friend's name here] told me that you may be looking for someone to help you with such and such project."

Most people hate making cold calls to find new prospects for their business but when making follow-up calls to your existing clients, you have opportunities to:

  • Find out if they have a friend who is looking to create a project of their own,
  • If the client you are speaking with may be looking at another project soon, or
  • If they have heard of a project that you may be qualified to work with.

Those who practice the best follow-up skills, do so usually by contacting their clients:

  • The day after the sale. This is usually done to make sure everything is okay and to again thank the client for their business and to tell them how much you appreciated working with them. A little human courtesy goes a long way and most people like to work with those who are pleasant to work with.
  • A week after the initial sale, another call is made to see if all is going well and to ask how reaction to the project is going among those now exposed to it? This often will generate conversations towards "Version 2.0" of the project and can get a lot of extra business coming your way.
  • A month after the sale. This is done in somewhat the same way as the week follow-up but here you can make it much more focused on learning if they have anyone who has seen the project that might have expressed a wish to do something of their own.
  • Six months after the sale. This is just to maintain an open channel to the client and you might even suggest an idea or two that you have had for an update to freshen the product for your client. "Nothing pressing, {Your client's name here}, it's just that I've been thinking about your goals for this video (or employee training or sales tool) and these are just some of the ideas that have struck me since we last finished the project." Often, they will be impressed that you are even thinking about their business or ways to streamline things or increase results.
  • One year after the initial project. This is just a courtesy call to see what may be on the plate for the immediate or near future.

Even in today's highly computerized world where so much is done through the Internet and through automated phone systems, etc., people still want to do business with people.

Successful follow-up reaffirms to your client that you see yourself as a part of their team and are willing to use your time, talents and drive to bring continued value and support to their business. With the costs of business as high as they are in todays world, this is a calling card that is hard to ignore and is sure to bring more business to your door.

-- Ron Lindeboom



For more tips about marketing yourself, please see Ron Lindeboom's
Clients or Grinders: The Choice Is Yours

###

©2005 by Ron Lindeboom and CreativeCOW.net. All rights are reserved.


Click here to visit Creative COW's user forums and many other articles
if you arrived at this page by a direct link




Related Articles / Tutorials:
Business & Marketing
Seven Ways to Make Your Own Luck in The Film Industry

Seven Ways to Make Your Own Luck in The Film Industry

HBO Director of Workflow, post-house founder, owner of the first two RED cameras, founder and developer of Endcrawl, technologist, futurist, educator, and more: John 'Pliny' Eremic, is regularly asked for career advice in the field of filmmaking. Step One, he says, is to consider a new job. There's much more of course, delivered with Pliny's peerless wit, directness, and insight. Whether you're just starting in the business, or looking to break through to the next level, you won't want to miss this guide to making your own luck.

Feature
John 'Pliny' Eremic
Business & Marketing
Creative COW Turns 15! A Celebration of Being Uncool

Creative COW Turns 15! A Celebration of Being Uncool

15 years is a long time on the internet! Travel back with us to the days before YouTube, social media, digital cinema, smartphones, iPods and all the rest, back to the founding of Creative COW by Ronald & Kathlyn Lindeboom in April 2001. Join us for an insider's look at the earliest days of the professional digital video revolution, all the way through the events that have shaped the world's largest community of media professionals, right here at Creative COW.

Editorial, Feature
Tim Wilson
Business & Marketing
7 Customer Service Rules for Better Post Production

7 Customer Service Rules for Better Post Production

Dealing with people is industry-agnostic, but in an industry as competitive as ours, repeat business is everything -- and your clients are more likely to return to you if your customer service skills are great. Here are some customer service tips that are especially helpful for post production.

Feature
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
An Odd Delight: A Corporate Editor's Leap Into Broadcast

An Odd Delight: A Corporate Editor's Leap Into Broadcast

Creative COW Contributing Editor Kylee Wall moved from Indianapolis to Atlanta as part of a move from corporate video into broadcast. Sure, some things stayed the same, but so much more was so different -- a new place to live, a new kind of workspace, new kinds of projects, AND TAPE -- that transitioning to a new NLE in Adobe Premiere Creative Cloud was the least of it. Certainly nothing compared to a fever of 104 that took her out for most of her first week. It's a remarkable tale that Kylee tells as only she can.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
Women In Post Join Forces

Women In Post Join Forces

Women in Post is a new HPA (Hollywood Post Alliance) committee formed by and for a decidedly minority group in the world of film/TV high technology. After three meetings -- two of them successful round table discussions, featuring accomplished women in the industry -- the group is expanding its plans to offer networking, mentoring and camaraderie and more.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Debra Kaufman
Business & Marketing
Suck It Up, Buttercup

Suck It Up, Buttercup

The Best Excuses from New or Underemployed Filmmakers and Freelancers: "You've really really got to stop being lazy and making excuses for not getting what you want," says Creative COW Contributing Editor Kylee Wall. "Seriously. It's sad and it makes me sad for you. So sad in fact, that I've created this BEST OF compilation of stupid excuses. It's perhaps a little more brash than my usual fare. Don't mistake this for arrogance. I'm young and stupid too, but I'm still allowed to almost rant. Pseudo-rant. Pretend I made you cookies and you're eating them as you read this."

Editorial, Feature
Kylee Peña
Business & Marketing
Get Hired! Be Professional and Pay Attention to Detail

Get Hired! Be Professional and Pay Attention to Detail

"As technology gets better, communications skills seem to get worse." So says Creative COW leader and Contributing Editor Walter Biscardi, one of the industry's most respected business owners. "The same talented people who can create amazing things on screen have absolutely no idea how to represent themselves via a resume or online demo. Most of what I'm about to say seems to be common sense, but apparently it isn't." You definitely don't want to miss this potentially career-changing advice from an industry luminary!

Editorial, Feature
Walter Biscardi
Business & Marketing
The Heroism of Joyful Creativity

The Heroism of Joyful Creativity

I'm constantly inspired by the pleasure and the pride that the people in Creative COW Magazine take in doing the right things the right way, in always trying to improve, and always keeping their eyes peeled for new possibilities. I aspire to do my own work as creatively and joyfully as they do.

Editorial
Tim Wilson
Business & Marketing
Promote Your Company Worldwide, FREE.

Promote Your Company Worldwide, FREE.

Creative COW's Services Offered Directory is a Powerful Free Resource for Your Business.

Editorial
Ronald Lindeboom
Business & Marketing
The Back Forty: The Real Truth Of How Creative Cow Magazine Did Not Win An Award

The Back Forty: The Real Truth Of How Creative Cow Magazine Did Not Win An Award

Tim Wilson takes over the Back Forty for this issue to say, "Allow me to interrupt our regularly scheduled Back Forty to tell you what happened when our publisher Ronald Lindeboom called me one morning in April, saying, 'You're not going to believe this, Creative COW Magazine finally won an award!'"

Editorial
Tim Wilson
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]