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PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips

COW Library : Adobe Premiere Pro : Bill O'Neil : PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
CreativeCOW presents PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips -- Adobe Premiere Pro Review


www.chicagospots.com
Chicago Illinois USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


With the popularity of HD-DSLRs, many shooters are recording sound separately because of the camera's limitations with audio. For the past year, I've been shooting my spots on the Blackmagic Design Cinema Camera. The video looks terrific but the audio is clunky. The camera has no audio level setting so audio is always a guess. (Blackmagic solved this issue and many more with the release of the Ursa.)

As a solution, I always hire a sound guy to record audio separately. At the end of the shoot, he gives me a flash drive containing the audio files.

It used to be a tedious process to manually "glue" the audio back to the picture in post, but with Red Giant's PluralEyes it's simple. In fact it's so easy, I don't even need to use a clapboard or timecode.

PluralEyes works as a both a standalone program or inside of your NLE with the extension. I prefer working inside of Adobe Premiere, but PluralEyes also works inside Apple Final Cut Pro, FCPX, Avid Media Composer/Symphony, and Sony Vegas Pro.


PluralEyes working as an Extension inside Premiere Pro. Please click on any image for a larger view.

I drag all of my clips onto the timeline and then drag in the corresponding audio. I make sure to eliminate all of the non-audio b-roll clips from the timeline, and then I'm ready to begin.


THREE STEPS

There are 3 steps to align your audio to the footage: Add Media, Synchronize and Export Timeline.




The first step is automatic when you add files or a timeline. It might take a few minutes to analyze depending on the length of your timeline or the amount of files. The "Preparing Media" progress bar will tell you when it's ready to synchronize.


Through the NLE extension, PluralEyes opens independently in its own window to analyze the clips from the Premiere timeline you assembled.



The PluralEyes timeline before processing begins


As a standalone app, you need to simply drag your footage folders/files and corresponding audio folder/files into the project window. PluralEyes automatically creates a timeline and begins to analyze the files.

Next, click the "Synchronize" button and PluralEyes aligns the audio with the camera footage. It can even sync the audio with multiple cameras.


PluralEyes synchronized



When I'm shooting interviews, I stop and start my camera to index the clips, but my sound guy will often let his audio recorder roll. It really doesn't matter to PluralEyes. It will sift through the audio waveforms and find the matching camera footage for perfect alignment. Plural Eyes even fixes camera "drift" for longer takes when the sound "drifts" out of sync.




The last step is "Export Timeline". This will create a timeline with the audio synced under the camera audio and footage and import it into the Premiere project. I especially like the option to also create a separate timeline with replaced audio trimmed to the length of the clip.



Replaced timeline


The standalone version will export a timeline of your choosing which you can import into your NLE.


PLURALEYES TIPS
I have a few shooting tips to prepare for PluralEyes.

If a clip is too short, PluralEyes might not have enough to analyze. Make sure your camera mic is enabled and within proximity to the subject.

As a protection, I have my sound guy plug a ¼ inch jack from his recorder into my Blackmagic camera. (DSLR cameras have a mini-jack input.) I have used low and slightly over-modulated camera audio levels, but PluralEyes has always been able to analyze it.

Also, you might consider syncing your clips in separate batches. I tried dragging a day's worth of shooting onto a timeline and I found PluralEyes a bit sluggish. As I mentioned, I like to delete any non-audio b-roll clips or erroneous audio files from the timeline to help speed up the process.

I can remember the hours I used to spend aligning audio with picture, but Plural Eyes makes this process fast and easy so I can focus on editing. I'm not sure what's going on behind the scenes of this useful program but I assume the analysis of waveforms are compared for matches and then paired together.

PluralEyes can be purchased on its own or as part of the Red Giant Shooter Suite.







Bill O'Neil has been shooting spots for 35 years, using cinematic production values on low budgets to create what he calls 30-second movies. Take a look at his work at Chicago Spots, and follow Bill on Twitter, @chicagospots.

You'll also want to check out Bill O'Neil's other articles in the Creative COW Library, which include some of the most popular tutorials we've ever posted.

Comments

Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Paulo Hoeven
PluralEyes saved me so much time! Very useful! Thanks :)
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by JP Pelc
This is very efficient indeed but you still need to keep an eye on your sync while editing, especially with DSLR footage. I've found with the 7D especially that it's own audio is almost always a frame or two ahead of the video. Considering PluralEyes and Premiere simply match waveforms, that means the newly synced audio will also be a frame or two ahead.
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Micah Vanderlinden
In premiere pro cc, the functionality to synchronize via waveform is built-in. See this how-to here: http://nofilmschool.com/2014/12/automatically-sync-dual-system-audio-premie...
+1
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Eric Santiago
As far as PluralEyes and Premiere Pro CC 2014, both have failed me on R3D/WAV audio sync.
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Nathan Walters
I love the idea of PluralEyes but there's one key reason I don't use it. I hate the idea of having every clip that needs synced audio dumped into a timeline. I prefer to keep things in the media browser where I can then, one by one, go through and put things in the timeline. Rather than having to shuffle through tons of clips. Especially when working on longer pieces. It's just cleaner I feel. I'm hoping they one day have an easy audio syncing solution that then places the clips with synced audio into a bin instead of a timeline.

Nathan Walters
Halo Union Productions
http://www.HaloUnion.com
+1
@Nathan Walter
by Jonas Bendsen
Premiere takes some getting used to if you've been using FCP or AVID all your life. One of those things is that it's more efficient to use a "timeline bin" (an actual timeline) instead of working from file bins. Obviously you don't *have* to work this way, and it's definitely not the "industry standard" method, but I've found working from a timeline rather than the bins is MUCH more efficient and effective in Premiere (for SO MANY reasons).

For me this kind of thinking started back in CS5.5 editing a feature shot on RED (and back then, Premiere was the ONLY game in town allowing you to edit RED files natively). You couldn't link audio/video in the bins, so all video was selected from a timeline (where the audio and video had been synced up).

:::::::::::::::::::::
This is my life, I edit and edit and edit and edit...

http://TeahmBeahm.com
http://Digabyte.com
@Jonas Bendsen
by JP Pelc
I have been using Premiere for years and I don't find a "timeline bin" more efficient at all. It's all user preference I guess but to me it is much more messy and slower than browsing and organizing out of the project window
Re: Article: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Timothée Ferreol
This extension on SVP is more than awesome, I highly recommend it, literally saved me from hours and hours of syncing.


___________________________________________

If you want to check out my work =) : https://vimeo.com/timof
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Jonas Bendsen
I used Pluraleyes for the first time two weeks ago. I had done a three camera shoot (2x 7D, BMCC) plus an external recorder with three mics (H4N) on a speaker in a gymnasium (with a follow up in a classroom). I fully expected Pluraleyes to "sort of work," but incredibly it synced up every single clip from the four hour day. Not only that, but it synced audio clips that were close-mic'd with clips that were mostly ambient noise (audience). That means it found the hard to hear speaker's voice in the "room mic" audio clips and synced it with his hand-held wireless mic clips. Pretty incredible. Being able to hit a single button and wait a couple minutes for everything to sync up probably saved me nearly a day's worth of work. Crazy. I don't imagine it will work this well *every* time, but I was certainly impressed with my first experience (and subsequently purchased the software).

By the way: Rode is currently running a promotion (till the end of 2015) that will get you a copy of Pluraleyes Express for free with the purchase of a Rode mic. Also be aware, there is a new version of the Rode VideoMic Pro... most places are still selling old stock, but there is a new version with a better Rycote Lyre isolation system, a better cord, and a new and improved capsule.

:::::::::::::::::::::
This is my life, I edit and edit and edit and edit...

http://TeahmBeahm.com
http://Digabyte.com
@Jonas Bendsen
by Jonas Bendsen
Can't seem to edit my original post, but realized I forgot to mention I'm editing in Premiere CS6.

:::::::::::::::::::::
This is my life, I edit and edit and edit and edit...

http://TeahmBeahm.com
http://Digabyte.com
Re: Article: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Nick Meyers
While Pluraleyes does what it says it will do, in my experience, it also has some rather unwanted side-effects in FCP7.
It messes with the Master/Affiliate nature of the clips in some way such that the clips you receive from plraulayes don't behave in the proper Master/Affiliate way.

changes made to a clip in the browser (colour, name), are not always reflected in the clip in the timeline, for instance.
it's a subtle thing too, sometimes its obvious, sometimes not, and worst, sometimes a few days later you can find you've lose the master affiliate relationship altogether.

the way i've dealt with this is to do a complete replace of all synced clips from the source files (using option command f and the replace function, built into a Quickeys macro)

if i'm in this situation again (cutting on FCP7 with clips with no matching TC), I'd consider using FCPX to sync.
while I haven't used it, i believe FCP X will sync using audio waveforms too, so no need for PLuraleyes at all in that platform.


nick
Re: PluralEyes: COuld not sync
by Gene Massey
I could not get it to sync either - FCP 7. I think you have to hold your mouth in a certain position to make it work - or maybe you need to chant a certain mantra.

Geneoski
Re: PluralEyes: Fast & Easy Connections for Video & Audio Clips
by Eric Santiago
Tried to use it last night with RED files and SD788T WAV files.
Could not get it to sync anything.
I guess its not ready for R3Ds.


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