LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Editing the Farrelly's The Three Stooges

COW Library : Cinematography : Sam Seig : Editing the Farrelly's The Three Stooges
CreativeCOW presents Editing the Farrelly's The Three Stooges -- Cinematography Feature


Los Angeles, California USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.



First AE Dave Ray-mond (L) and 2nd AE Charley E. Spaht ham it up with a Stooges prop in one of the three Avid Ni-trix DX suites running on Avid Unity. All dailies were created in Avid DNxHD 36. Cutting comedy is such hard work.
Any great comedian will tell you that comedy is about timing. That is why editing plays such a crucial role in comedic features like The Three Stooges. Finding the natural rhythm, letting the joke play, knowing how to pace the audience response, is more of a feeling that an editor needs to develop aside from the technical skills.

The creative minds behind There's Something About Mary, Kingpin, and many others were certainly comfortable with physical humor, but bringing the Stooges to the big screen has been a real challenge for Peter and Bobby Farrelly. Everyone knows the style and look of the original trio, and has loved it for a good part of their lives. From what we've edited so far, I'm confident that the audience will not be disappointed. The casting is perfect, with Sean Hayes, Will Sasso, and Chris Diamantopoulos, as Larry, Curly and Moe, and the slap-stick visual humor is true to form.

I've worked with the Farrelly Brothers since serving as an Assistant Editor on Kingpin, and as Editor on their last three features.

This is also the second feature we've done in Atlanta. My team and I were here last year for the Farrelly's Hall Pass. We prefer to cut on location, because it allows us to screen a scene with Peter and Bobby as soon as it is cut, and it gives production ample time to reshoot if there is a technical problem, i.e negative damage etc.

They are great directors to work for, as they encourage input and collaboration from the editorial team.



SLAPS, GAGS & MASTERS
The storyline begins as the three baby brothers are left on the steps of an orphanage where they are discovered by a nun, played by Larry David, who is the victim of their earliest physical pranks. As adults, they are on a mission to save the only home they knew as kids from bankruptcy.



The storyline begins as the three baby brothers are left on the steps of an orphanage where they are discovered by a nun.


The shoot was very complex as there were many physical stunts and special rigs required to safely handle the various pratfalls. And as anyone knows the sound effects are a big element in the pranks.

To make the first cuts work, we had to have the "bonks, boings, slaps" sound effects laid in at each cue. Some of them are old classic effects, so we took sound samples from the DVD copies of the originals to be sure we matched the style. These will be replaced later in audio post with re-mastered effects.

As physical as the comedy is for Stooges, I have found, as in the original shorts, that the gags play best in the master shots. You want to keep it "open" to give the audience time to laugh. If you remember the famous hair gel scene, from Something About Mary, it was necessary to open up the reaction shot to allow for a big laugh before the next scene could play.

That is why it's extremely important to preview the film for an audience. You want to see how a packed theater responds, and make sure that the edit gives them room to respond the way they want.




The Three Stooges trailer


A "TEAM SPORT"
Editing is "team sport" and I am supported by two assistants that work closely with the lab in managing the technical aspects of the dailies. First AE Dave Raymond has worked with me on three Farrelly Bros. films now, and makes sure all the dailies specs are correct. He breaks out scenes into bins each day and has them ready for my review. He also tracks any shots that need to be scanned in advance for VFX, such as wire and rig removals.

This is critical, as we shot over 450,000 feet of 35mm, and transferred to HDCAM SR 4:4:4 tapes and Avid DNxHD 36 editorial files. Dave is also the main contact with the lab, making sure the dailies, camera logs, and script notes are accurate.

When we were in Atlanta last year, we added Charley B. Spaht as our 2nd AE, who creates the Code Book of all the Avid Metadata in a File Maker Pro database. These are essential for the final conform.



ON LOCATION, ON MY FEET
When we cut on location, we bring in three Avid Nitris DX systems and a Unity rented from Sixteen 19 in New York. I still run Media Composer 4.05 since I'm familiar with all its features and I know it's stable.

I used to cut on Moviolas and flatbeds when I was an assistant to Michael Kahn on big action films like Minority Report. When working with film you had think about your edit before cut-ting the workprint. Avid makes that work much faster, but it's es-sentially just a big "butt splicer." As efficient as the Avid may be, the most important editing tool I have is my brain. You've got to see the story in your mind first.

I have a unique style in that I edit standing up on an elevated console rather than sitting in a chair. I find I have more energy and stamina cutting this way and feel more physically free to move around.


Stand Up Comedy - Editor Sam Seig standing at the console of an Avid Nitris DX system on location in Atlanta. Sam cut the entire Farrelly Brothers comedy, Three Stooges, standing up.
Stand Up Comedy - Editor Sam Seig standing at the console of an Avid Nitris DX system on location in Atlanta. Sam cut the entire Farrelly Brothers comedy, Three Stooges, standing up.


After we wrap in Atlanta, I'll take a week to complete a first as-sembly of the full film. That gives the directors time to step away from the work and see it with fresh eyes. We'll move our editing systems to Cape Cod and spend five weeks with Bobby Farrelly on the cut, then we'll head to Ojai, California, to work with Peter Farrelly for five more weeks to complete the Director's Cut.

After that, the studio execs at Fox will set up test screenings before we make the final cut. I am with the film all the way through the sound mix, to the DI stage at EFILM, to the final Answer Print.

Some might say I'm being "type cast" as a comedy editor, but I've worked on large action films in the past and I prefer the light-hearted atmosphere one finds in most comedy editing rooms. I may never win an Oscar, but at least I'll be laughing for the rest of my career.

Some may consider the Stooges humor to be less sophisticated, but is the film laugh-out-loud funny? As Curly would say, Soitenly! (Non-Stooge translation: Certainly!) Who needs awards when, to quote an old movie phrase, you can "make 'em laugh!"








FILM, COLOR, AND COLLABORATION
You may already have guessed my perspective on this, but contrary to what you've heard, film is not dead. This was our second time to work with the local Atlanta lab, Cinefilm. We did Hall Pass with them and everyone has been impressed with their work. Veteran DP Matt Leonetti was also back working with us, and was ready to jump into work with colorist John Petersen (above, working on The Three Stooges) in Cinefilm's Spirit/DaVinci 2K Suite. Matt knows exactly what he wants, but he was using a new stock this time, Kodak Vision 5207. When he came in for the test with John, he was surprised how quick it went -- John was able to call up the basic look he used on Hall Pass last year, and make some minor tweaks. Building on a relationship makes a big difference.



Comments

Re: Editing the Farrelly's The Three Stooges
by Colin Edelman
Does anyone know what Sam is talking about when he says, "our 2nd AE, who creates the Code Book of all the Avid Metadata in a File Maker Pro database. These are essential for the final conform." ?

Filemaker Pro to me is creating time sheets. Any info is appreciated.

Colin Edelman
@Colin Edelman
by Paul Buhl
Colin,

The code book is obviously extremely helpful in the overall editorial process in the sense of have a central document with all of the vital info per shot/edit. Especially in VFX heavy films where the exact in and out frames are important while the shot is moving through various stages and applications used to create the VFX. So a central doc with shot name, TC, in and out frame, notes on repos, timewarps, reversals, etc., is great.

BUT, I've also seen very successful conforms on small indie films without a code book, simply with XML and EDL files generated from the FCP or Avid sequence. So when Sam says it's essential, I think he means more in the role it plays in the entire editorial process from an organization pov, and however he uses the doc's metadata in his overall approach to the conform.

The way File Maker Pro creates these code book style docs seems to be a bit complex, and requires advanced knowledge of the program. I have not done it myself, but worked alongside someone who was trying to figure it out.

Paul Buhl
paulbuhlmail@gmail.com
Feature Editor
paulbuhl.com
Staff Editorial
hydraulx.com
Re: Editing the Farrelly's The Three Stooges
by Paul Jackson
Wow, do I believe my eyes...Creative Cow doing an article featuring Avid! Never thought I'd see that happen again. Hey Cow, whad'ya think about FCP-X?
@Paul Jackson
by Ronald Lindeboom
We've done quite a number of articles on Avid. You have not been digging very deep, Paul. You may want to write Tim Wilson at tim@creativecow.net because he can quote you chapter and verse.

What do we think of FCPX? Well, we think there are a lot of varied opinions on it. Some love it, others hate it.

My personal opinion is that if I were to edit a documentary that I was producing as a single producer in charge of the entire project -- doing it as a one-man band -- it would be a great tool. But to work on a network episodic television series or a major film, you wouldn't catch me using it for love nor money.

Best regards,

Ronald Lindeboom
CEO Emeritus, Creative COW LLC
Publisher Emeritus, Creative COW Magazine
A 2011 FOLIO: 40 honoree as one of the 40 most influential publishers in America
http://www.creativecow.net


Creativity is a process wherein the student and the teacher are located in the same individual.

"Incompetence has never prevented me from plunging in with enthusiasm."
- Woody Allen

"You are the eggman, we are the eggmen, I am the walrus." - The Beatles


Related Articles / Tutorials:
Cinematography
All Eyes on IBC 2016 for Cameras and Lenses Galore

All Eyes on IBC 2016 for Cameras and Lenses Galore

What’s that you say? An IBC that’s not only relevant, but downright exhilarating? This used to not be news, of course. However, in recent years, IBC has too often become simply an opportunity for European audiences to see products already announced at NAB. In 2016, however, the focus swings sharply to Amsterdam, especially when it comes to cameras and lenses. IBC 2016 is shaping up to be one of the most dramatic trade shows for cinematographers, broadcasters, and videographers in years. Join Creative COW Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a speedy overview of some of the highlights.

Feature
Tim Wilson
Cinematography
Depth of Field: Gregg Toland, Citizen Kane and Beyond

Depth of Field: Gregg Toland, Citizen Kane and Beyond

Whenever somebody equates "shallow depth of field" and "cinematic look," it's important to remember that the opposite is also sometimes true. Creative COW Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson celebrates the work of Gregg Toland, ASC, born this week in 1904 -- the first master of extreme depth of field in movies like Citizen Kane and The Grapes of Wrath that forever changed what is possible for humans to do with cameras. This reprise of a classic article from the Creative COW Archives also offers a look at what Toland's approach to cinematic composition can mean for YOUR shooting.

Editorial, Feature
Tim Wilson
Cinematography
New Trends and Technology at Cine Gear Expo 2016

New Trends and Technology at Cine Gear Expo 2016

Cine Gear Expo 2016 exhibits open Friday June 3 and 4, at Paramount Studios in Hollywood, California with major screenings, filmmaker panel discussions, groundbreaking techniques and new equipment premiers that are sure to influence the filmmaking industry. Catering to the world’s top motion picture, video and new media visual artists, Paramount’s prestigious back lot is the ideal setting for professionals to meet with colleagues and nearly 300 top equipment vendors to see live demos and get their hands on the latest gear. Take a look at how this year's hottest trends are shaping up.

Feature
Susan Lewis
Cinematography
School, Teachers, Italian Neorealism & a Few Soviet Films

School, Teachers, Italian Neorealism & a Few Soviet Films

In this exclusive interview, generously granted to Creative COW by the Gamma and Density Journal, during his lifetime, Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC, sat down with Yuri Neyman, ASC to talk about his life as a cinematographer. We remember the genius.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Yuri Neyman
Cinematography
Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC, 1930 - 2016 - Remembering the Genius

Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC, 1930 - 2016 - Remembering the Genius

Winner of an Academy Award for Best Cinematography for his work on Close Encounters of the Third Kind, the long list of official accolades for Vilmos Zsigmond, ASC doesn't begin to illustrate the impact his work has had on generations of artists around the world. Friend, colleague, and Global Cinematography Institute co-founder Yuri Neyman, ASC shares some of his memories with us.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Yuri Neyman, ASC
Cinematography
Stepping into the Surgeon's Eyes

Stepping into the Surgeon's Eyes

Take advantage of years worth of Greg Ondera's surgical cinematography experience for cleaner, tighter shots and a better outcome.

Feature
Greg Ondera
Cinematography
Panasonic Makes 4K Handheld with AG-DVX200 Camcorder

Panasonic Makes 4K Handheld with AG-DVX200 Camcorder

Panasonic has announced a new large sensor 4K handheld camcorder with the same filmic quality of the VariCam, which also saw updates at this year's NAB Show.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Cinematography
Cinematographer-in-Residence: Mandy Walker ASC at UCLA

Cinematographer-in-Residence: Mandy Walker ASC at UCLA

Cinematographer Mandy Walker joins UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television as a Kodak Cinematographer in Residence, teaching the next generation of film students what it means to be a successful director of photography.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Cinematography
Adventures in 6K with Jackson, Wyoming's Brain Farm Cinema

Adventures in 6K with Jackson, Wyoming's Brain Farm Cinema

Staffed with outdoor sport enthusiasts and and fortified with the latest in 6K cameras and post production technology, Wyoming-based Brain Farm Cinema is taking wild leaps into the next level of production capabilities and working through challenges in media and infrastructure along the way.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Cinematography
The NASA IMAX Project with Cinematographer James Neihouse

The NASA IMAX Project with Cinematographer James Neihouse

James Neihouse, the large format cinematographer renowned for his work on projects from shuttle launches to volcanic eruptions, and newly-minted Academy member, finds himself working around the globe, literally, shooting the IMAX 3D film, Earth 2.0 (working title) co-produced by Walt Disney Pictures and NASA. In this feature, Neihouse reflects on experiences working with astronauts, race cars, and rocket launches, and how important choosing the best equipment is in extreme production.

Feature, People / Interview
Creative COW
MORE
© 2016 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]