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Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not

COW Library : Art of the Edit : Kylee Peña : Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not
CreativeCOW presents Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not -- Art of the Edit Editorial


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Sometimes sexism is exactly what you think it is.

So picture this: last day of NAB 2014. I'm wandering around killing time before I needed to head to the airport. I have a horrible cold. I am over it. I sit down at Quantel's booth (on squishy red squares) where a sharply dressed woman who was probably around my age (maybe, I'm bad at age guessing) was giving a very extensive demonstration of Pablo Rio, a highly specialized tool. I mean, there aren't even that many female editors in the world. Female Pablo demo artists? She MAY be the only one.


The Daily Show...

Across from Quantel's booth is RED's vast space, dramatically lit and crowded to the brim even in the final hours of the show. And just like they had all week, every hour on the hour (or so, I wasn't really sure), a dozen young women in teeny bikinis prance onto RED's stage to the pounding bass line of Lorde's "Royals", attracting a crowd of (mostly) guys armed with cameras. I suppose RED had some way to justify this in the context of cameras and skin tones or something, but having seen the runway models do their thing a few times, I never really figured it out the way I could figure out any other vendor's message while quickly walking by the booth.


Red's NAB 2014 entertainment featured a bikini showcase.
Red's NAB 2014 entertainment featured a bikini showcase.


"AND WE'LL NEVER BE ROYALS (ROYALS) / IT DON'T RUN IN OUR BLOOD..."

I guess Quantel's demo artist never really got it either. After what I'm sure were several days of suddenly being overtaken by blasting pop music and hollers to half-naked women, she paused and allowed herself to sigh at the sight of the show before picking back up and expertly finishing off the demonstration.

"BABY I'LL RULE I'LL RULE I'LL RULE I'LL RULE / LET ME LIVE THAT FANTASY."

Kind of an interesting song choice for such an occasion.

I asked both men and women at the show what they thought of RED's presentation. Many thought it was over the top. Most, even. But infrequently, from all genders and sexes: who cares, it's just a bit of fun, the women are willing participants, it's just a marketing thing, boys will be boys.

This is the kind of sexism that is exactly what you think it is. Despite the fact that it's obviously so wrong to so many people, it persists in our industry: booth babes, advertisements featuring white men in charge and women as artistic objects, naked women as marketing tools. This is Mad Men levels of smack a girl on the bum and ask her to your room sexual harassment. It's easy to spot and illustrate. It's prevalent in film and television and video games. Not only do I think a lot of people reading this would roll their eyes at such escapades, I've read many such criticisms of all forms of media that continue to objectify women like it's 1962.

Another trade show misstep by Blackmagic Design from later in the year was particularly appalling because the company is otherwise known for being professional and inclusive. An ad that continues to be available as a downloadable press image for the URSA camera depicts a scene where a group of standard looking guys are shooting a couple other standard looking guys.


A Blackmagic Design ad for the URSA features a woman as set decorationA Blackmagic Design ad for the URSA features a woman as set decoration
A Blackmagic Design ad for the URSA features a woman as set decoration.


And in the background, for some reason, we see a bikini-clad woman floating in water, pressed against the glass. She's not participating in the action. She's just there. It's like a sexy ficus plant shoved in the background for set dressing. And it's disappointing because when I think of "gratuitous," Blackmagic Design and their great people would never come to mind. They've not treated women as anything close to subhuman, rather as equals in front of a Resolve or in other production situations like on the front page of their website. It goes to show that it's not just companies with a certain reputation who are making these blatantly sexist mistakes.


Blackmagic Design's website features gender equality in the color room too.
Blackmagic Design's website features gender equality in the color room too.


As eye-rolling and icky as this stuff is, this is not the kind of sexism I think is hurting our industry the most, from my experience. Because sometimes sexism isn't what you think it is. It's systemic. It's passive. It's cultural. Everyone participates in it every day.

A woman told me a story about a visit around the exhibit hall at NAB this year. While walking with a male colleague, she was repeatedly treated like his personal assistant, given brochures and packets to look after for the man she was with. "A harmless mistake" some might say. A harmless mistake by multiple vendors, or an assumption based on internalized sexism? I've asked many women over the last year if they've ever experienced any kind of sexist behavior, and almost everyone says no as quickly as they can, as though admitting you've been harassed is admitting weakness. If I tell them this anecdote, they pause and think for a long time. "Now that you mention it..."


The south hall during NAB 2014
The south hall during NAB 2014


Women tend to go along with all levels of sexist stuff in our industry in order to be "one of the boys." I've been told a number of times they considered it a part of their induction into the industry, to "prove themselves" as worthwhile editors who "aren't like the other girls" and now happily enjoy the respect of their male counterparts. Not only is that not right at all, but every time you tell a group of male editors you "aren't like the other girls", you are collectively throwing your gender under the bus. To put it more in post-production terms: say you take a job for a quarter of the rate everyone else. What does this do for the whole of freelance editors? It devalues their work. In the same way, you're devaluing the work women are doing to achieve equality in post production when you take part in oppressive behaviors.

Assertive women are "bossy." Women who wear makeup care too much. Skinny women need to eat a sandwich. Who wears high heels in the edit suite? She should stick to cutting documentaries since she's got a woman's touch. These tiny little passive thoughts and actions are more damaging to gender equality in our industry than any trade show programming could ever be. Since they are not overt, it makes it easy to keep living this systemic brand of sexism, reinforcing gender stereotypes and keeping women in their place: as objects to be evaluated and protected like porcelain dolls. Worst of all, many of them seem positive but actually continue to push women into stereotypical roles of the gentler care-taking sex that needs to be protected by men: women are better editors, you'll make a great mother, behind every great man is a woman in charge.  The sexist bubble of the trade show is an obvious criticism of much larger problem: internalized gender bias that affects every person in the industry, but most are not quick to acknowledge.

So the bikini-Quantel-Red anecdote I told you about illustrates something very important about sexism: if sexism and harassment don't meet a careful narrative more apt for an human resources video than real life, it's scarcely considered sexism and harassment at all. Look at rape cases. Not that many follow the cinematic method of assault with a dark alley and an armed intruder and a hospital and police. Most often, women and men are raped by people they know. And these cases are commonly rejected as valid by so many people because the it isn't black and white. She was asking for it, dressed like that. Men don't get raped, what a wimp. She didn't say yes, but she also didn't say no. In these cases, people are quick to criticize the victim, asking them what they did to bring this onto themselves. Maybe she changed her mind or he shouldn't have gotten so drunk.

Most of the sexism in our industry is passive. The little thoughts and comments that go unsaid or unchecked but internalized. The jokes at a woman's expense that alienate her from her peers (because if she doesn't laugh, she's an overly sensitive prude.) Everyone does it, and it makes for a hostile work environment not where women are afraid they'll be touched the wrong way, but where women must decide if they want to have a child and risk career advancement or freeze their eggs and risk genetic problems; where women must work extra hard for historically less pay and are subject to higher scrutiny for the same jobs; or where women feel like they cannot break out of gender norms without looking like some kind of anomaly. And worst of all, women come to expect this as normal. It's just how it is, and to want it any different is to be treated differently and we can't have that.

When you look closely at a trade show like NAB or IBC, you can start to get a pretty accurate picture of our industry – one where women become mostly invisible when they work in the industry. One woman told me that her trade show experiences at IBC, NAB, and BVE left her feeling like she didn't exist, except for the parts where she was objectified: approaching vendors for information only to be ignored in favor of a man seeking similar information, while the only women working the booth served as decoration. She even had a presenter hit on her and ask for her number during a demo, making her gender the butt of a joke in front of a very large group of people that were supposed to be her peers.


At NAB, we brought together men and women to talk about our impressions and experiences on sexism in post.
At NAB, we brought together men and women to talk about our impressions and experiences on sexism in post.


According to various instructors in university-level media production programs across the US, classes that lead to careers in production and post are somewhere around 30-50% women. But the number of women actually working in Hollywood as directors, executive producers, editors and cinematographers has been less than 18% for over ten years according to a report by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University – a pretty massive gap unaccounted for anywhere. There are more women in these jobs who aren't working in Hollywood who aren't being counted (like me) by anyone. How many? An event like NAB would lead me to believe a huge gap between career-seekers and career-havers continues to exist. And why wouldn't it? The hostile environment of a trade show floor is the accurate representation of our industry that people don't want to admit. It's just turned up a couple notches from the subtle every day kinds of sexist thoughts and actions that account for not seeking out women or assuming women would rather have other jobs. It's a place where women are invisible unless they're objectified, and they're blamed for their own invisibility. Those who aren't willing to play sexist games are drowned out by pop music and cat calls.

There's been a lot of conversation about the phrase "not all men" this year, even spinning off a #yesallwomen hashtag this summer to show solidarity in these kinds of systemic sexist situations. Because when bad, violent things happen to women, the response (from men AND women) is often "not all men." Not all men do this. Not even most men do this. What these people mean to say: I don't do this. I'm a good person.

Whenever I write an article (or have a conversation or a Twitter chat) about women in post production, a significant chunk of the response is this: 

"My mentor was a woman."

"I work with a female editor."

"Thelma Shoonmaker is arguably the most well known editor."

"I've known a number of female editors over the years, and they've all been the best cutters I've worked with."

"Women were the original film editors."

That's really great. I'm glad to hear it. But here's the deal: these are defensive statements. They all start with an implied "but." 

"But my mentor was a woman."

"But I work with a female editor."

"But Thelma Shoonmaker is arguably the most well known editor."

"But I've known a number of female editors over the years, and they've all been the best cutters I've worked with."

"But women were the original film editors."

These statements shift the narrative to one's self. You have this woman telling you that she's distressed that the number of female editors in Hollywood hit its high point in the 1970s. She wants to start a conversation about how to make editing and other tech fields accessible to women. Your response is "I've worked with lots of female editors over the years," as if to separate yourself from the sexists out there that aren't hiring girls.

This is the same thing as saying "not all men." The response it's supposed to elicit from me: no, of course not. You've worked with women. You've hired girls. You're a good guy or lady. In a conversation about systemic sexism and hostile work environments, we're suddenly patting you on the back for being a decent human being. It's great that you aren't like that, and women recognize that yes, "not all men" are like that. But that doesn't change the fact that ALL women are deeply affected by sexism, whether they acknowledge it or not.

So you might say "well, what the f DO I say to you then?" I'm going to suggest this: ask us what we need from you. How can you help? Who can you mentor? What causes can you support? What kind of latent sexism can you nip out at work? How can you design print campaigns that don't use women as objects? How can you help young women discover their talents in science, technology, engineering, and math? How can you raise young men to respect women without even thinking about it? How can you help to erase harmful gender stereotypes? How soon can you add more women to your exhibition booths in professional roles? How many women can you hire? Are you actively looking for women to hire? Right now?


Megan McGough and I put together a meet-up for women and minorities at NAB - Photo credit Liam Johnson
Megan McGough and I put together a meet-up for women and minorities at NAB - Photo credit Liam Johnson


Originally, this was to be a simple summary article about NAB. See, in 2013, I wrote a somewhat divisive blog post asking where all the ladies were at NAB. This year I thought to myself, self, it's time to FIND them and see what they have to say about working toward gender equality in video production. PBS Frontline Post Production Supervisor Megan McGough and I organized a meet-up for women called Expanded Focus, and we met ladies (and some guys) from all over the country in all kinds of post production roles. And what was to be a casual mixer turned into a fiery discussion about how to change the culture of our industry to make it more appealing to younger women.

I asked them what got them into this industry during out meet-up. Passion. But what kept them? People caring. Men and women giving them a chance. Asking and answering questions. Mentors, support systems, friends. Not people who declared themselves not to be sexists, but people who worked against the grain to make things possible for them by giving them advice, guidance, and jobs.

Danilda Martinez, a video producer and director from Florida, said a teacher named Paula awakened her passion for editing and journalism. Her Dominican mother taught her to be relentless. And her mentor gave her truth.

Sian Fever
Sian Fever

Sian Fever, an editor from the UK, told me her mother changed her internalized perspective on gender roles, opening her career possibilities from being an assistant to anything she could ever want.


Tamara Miller
Tamara Miller

Tamara Miller, a musician/songwriter in Austin, was influenced by her mom, who promoted creativity and positivity at an early age. 


In a toxic environment of latent sexism, consistency and encouragement for building young women up to be editors or sound engineers or directors is ultimately how our systemic sexism is going to unravel. Getting women in science, technology, engineering and math careers fields is not a fad. Feminism isn't a marketing movement. It's the process of unlearning and making individual changes that add up to a whole. By recognizing the ways that all of us contribute to a culture of passive sexism, we can slowly start to change our environment and make it better for the next group of women – of which there will be many many more.

Especially if you start hiring them. Or re-thinking your next trade show – not just by ditching the sexist booth entertainment, but purposely putting the smart, capable, invisible women in your organization into visible spaces.

Because sometimes sexism is exactly what you think it is and you can do better than that.


Comments

Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not
by Muhammad Uqbah Ahmad Termizi
sexism exits everywhere even among women,if men can cook and make a cloth from tortured white rabbit. Yet, they still cant comprehended that working is means "working". Its was never gender issue.
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not
by Christopher Johnson
I just want to confirm Ian Montgomery's experience above. In documentary post production for 17 years, I've found most producers are female and approx 50% or more of the editors are female. Even most of my post supervisors have been female. I totally understand that this might be an anomaly and just our experience in one corner of the larger production world, so I think it may be worth paying attention to for that very reason. Why are documentary post jobs at the very least equal, if not biased towards women? There may be something to learn there.

My own non-scientific hunch has been that editing requires "skilled empathy" -- putting oneself into the shoes of the other, namely the subject of the film, in order to find truth in the cut, and so sensitive men join women in excelling in this skill.

Again, the documentary experience may be the exception. Maybe we can find some clues in there and apply them elsewhere to help solve this.

AJA io XT, FCP 7.0.3, OS X 10.9.2, 2012 non-Retina MacBook Pro, i7, 16 gig RAM, , Panasonic Plasma, USB-3 RAID
+1
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think, Sometimes Not
by Inga Foley
Thank you for this article. As an engineer who edits and has been once to NAB I found exactly what you state in your article. I was treated as a secretary, I was even greeted that way and handed materials for the 'technical' folks. I had one demo. I was the first one walking by and said I was an CMX editor, the guy from Accom was real helpful and personable and gave a great demo on their Axial editor. It was the only demo I received the whole time I was there. Inclusion is lacking in our field.
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Ian Montgomery
I am curious to know the actual statistics regarding the percentage of women working within post. After over 20 years working as an editor, I have found in most situations the percentage of women to men to be fairly even. Indeed within documentary, my belief is that female editors are larger in numbers and generally more sought after. I have also found that within post, the role of producer is nearly exclusively female and have known of male producers complaining how difficult it is to get work. I have also never come across a disparity between levels of pay for men and women in post. I guess these are just my experiences and must not be representative of the industry?

I am not saying within production and nearly every other facet of film and television media creation that this is true, sadly you only have to visit any set to see this. I am just surprised to read that within post sexism is still considered a major issue and would love to know dedicated post statistics.

Perhaps I need to crawl out of my little dark room more often to take a better look around.
+1
@Ian Montgomery
by Kylee Peña
Getting real statistics for the demographic of people working in media production outside Hollywood has been difficult for me -- I checked into it. The job titles, roles and responsibilities scattered across all kinds of media production probably make it difficult information to gather. If anyone has this information, I'd love to see it.

I think the observation by several university professors that 30-50% of their classes are women is important for this point though. There are female producers, but nowhere close to 30-50% of an editorial/VFX team is women -- on average, from my experience and questioning. So the assumption is that women go to university for media, then leave the industry for a variety of reasons: some personal, some sexist, many a combination of both whether they realize it or not.

I think you can look at the gender divide for science, technology, engineering and math for some examples of pay disparity and toxic environments. Many of these jobs have nothing to do with TV/film, but some of them kind of have some crossover -- like I have a minor in computer science with my video production degree and I might use it more than my degree -- so it's at least worth looking at their data since it's well-researched.

From a 2012 Forbes article:

"A 2011 report by the U.S. Department of Commerce found only one in seven engineers is female. Additionally, women have seen no employment growth in STEM jobs since 2000."

That's basically exactly the same numbers as the report I cite in my article about female Hollywood film editors -- 18% editors, no growth since 1998. And that's talking about ALL engineers in the US, not a "bubble" of the industry. Sure, we aren't engineers, but we aren't completely unlike engineers. I think that's pretty telling.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by J. Miller Adam
Given the industry you're discussing, it is not surprising – Hollywood and Entertainment is perhaps the most powerful and entrenched source and echo chamber of so many sexist, racist, classist, ageist stereotypes. The sexism is just one of the easiest, most acceptable and profitable buttons the sales culture pushes to gain our attention.
I'm not saying this to excuse anyone. The sexist environment you describe sounds unpleasant for both women and men. The same knuckle-under and conform pressures used to control and exploit women are used against men in businesses, though perhaps less overtly (and probably for a higher pay scale). In either case, it is an example of oppression or exploitation hiding behind the fig leaf of cultural norms. It makes the environment sound like a car lot. I will say that I recently attended Adobe Max in L.A. and the environment was far more professional and less toxic. Then again, I will do anything I can to avoid any convention held in Las Vegas. Las Vegas + Entertainment Industry is just a perfect storm of sleaziness.
Keep up the good work and keep making noise.
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Carrie Savage-Zimmerman
Thanks for shining a light on this issue. It's been insidious in this industry for the past 35 years. I struggled to be visible as a writer, producer and production crew member along with other females in the various middle-sized markets in which I plied my trade. And even as my husband and I met, married and worked together in the industry, I was told that I shouldn't expect to be paid the same as my male peers since I wasn't head of a household/family provider. Yea. Insidious culture to attempt to change. I'm not a glam-ham in stilettos either. The mid-2000's recession essentially supplied the icing on the cake. I was forced to look elsewhere for generating income and started my own (non-media production) business in mid-2011. I miss the creative process and general production climate. And I don't miss the constant stress of having to prove my existence, much less my talent, skills and experience. Continue shining this light.
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Bob Carroll
Thanks for the article. It is always good to take a little time to reflect. This problem isn't unique to post - everything you mentioned happens in nearly every industry in the United States. Sexist notions are very deeply engrained in our societal collective conscious. Sexism isn't just bad for women. It is bad for everyone. We should also be mindful that sexist attitudes and expectations against men are just as abundant, and just as harmful.

In almost every job I have ever had, the men were expected to do the more physical work. As a manager, I have had women tell me they wouldn't carry flats, because they were women. And if a woman faces some constraints about what she might wear, men are practically chained to their wardrobe. I have never seen a man wear a skirt or silk scarf to work - and I am pretty sure he would be fired instantly. Men are nearly always expected to ignore the needs of their family when it conflicts with work. When my first daughter was born, it was made very clear to me that I would not be allowed to take any time off, even though FMLA rules said otherwise. I open doors for men and women, but I have never had a woman open a door and let me pass first.

My wife and I have both worked in either production or post for most of our careers. She has nearly always made more money than I. But there was never even a possibility of discussion about who might take summers off to stay home with our daughter. I always thought that Mr. Mom was a poke at a dying stereotype, but so many years later, it doesn't seem like that stereotype is even sick. I don't think I know a single stay-home dad. Sometimes I just want to stay home and cry, but no one understands. They just tell me to man up.

When I try to talk about these issues, I am always told that they don't exist, or that I'm being to sensitive about it. I have also been told flat out that these problems don't compare to the problems that women face. I don't know whether they compare, but I don't even think there is a point to comparing. We need to all be mindful of others. We need to empathize. We need to be tolerant and supportive. If we can't do that, we all lose.
+2
@Bob Carroll
by Kylee Peña
Child-rearing is such a needlessly complicated topic for men and women. You might be heartened to know that the number of men who choose to stay at home with children has increased dramatically since the 80s (I checked -- 5% to 21%). This NPR story I heard last year talks a lot about men in these stay at home roles and the support system they've developed, and I found it really interesting. It sounds like it might be past your time to make such a decision for yourself, but at least you can take solace that things are shifting. And if we work on ditching our latent sexism, these things won't be so closely attached to our gender.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Brian Pienkoski
Thank you for such an illuminating look at our industry. This is what is meant by institutionalized sexism. It is ingrained in our society, and even those of us who are trying to overcome it sometimes inadvertently fall into sexist practices.
It's hard to tell sometimes what is and is not sexist. For example the image used on the header of this article shows a man and a woman in silhouette, engaging in a tug-of-rope. I couldn't help but notice that the woman is thin, wearing a short skirt, and high heels. Is this sexist? it sort of feels that way to me.
@Brian Pienkoski
by Kylee Peña
Thanks! I don't think the imagery itself, or any imagery of women shown with skirts or high heels, is inherently sexist. It may be stereotypical to show a standard size 8 woman in heels to represent "female", but I think the intent -- to get a point across quickly with relatively simple imagery -- is not sexist because it shows a standard man and woman on equal ground in what appear to be business casual attire. Many woman choose to wear things besides skirts in the workplace but it wouldn't come across very well in a silhouette.

The point of my response is to reinforce that showing a woman in "girl clothes" is not necessarily a sexist decision in any kind of advertising. It depends on context and intent, I think. But it was a point worth bringing up, and I'd be open to opposing views on such a thing.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com
@Kylee Wall
by Brian Pienkoski
I'm not certain it is. I do know that the first thing I looked at was her silhouette. Even before I saw what the article was about. And I thought that it was really ironic. Maybe it's my issue. I'll freely admit to that. But when I posted the link to my FB page, the only comment I've gotten so far is "Love the heels and skirt. That's what I look for in my female coworkers!"
The other question I have is why have a man and a women in an adversarial situation? If sexism is going to end in our society it has to be men that end it.
And really, this is very much in the 'hey there's a nit--let's pick it!' vein. Thanks for writing the article.
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Emily Dekovich
THANK YOU creative cow for addressing this! Sexism is so embedded in entertainment, it's often just accepted. Glad you gals & guys brought this to light.
Re: Article: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Douglas Bowker
Well articulated article. I have no answers, but can only say some of the best animators and video professionals I've worked with have been women. I also think sexism on an individual basis is an accurate indicator of a person who is too afraid to compete fairly, usually due to their own inadequacies.

Doug Bowker

Motion graphics, video and 3D Animation for the Medical and Technical World
http://www.dbowker3d.com
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by David Smith
An excellent, important article, thank you. I'll confess to having long been a part of the Not All Men reaction. Add the institutional racism that's rampant in our industry, and it's easy to imagine all of the creative energy we are keeping suppressed.

The cultural/institutional reality is hard to move, and complicated too. How do we open up the industry to new people without hurting the people I already work with? Jobs are often scarce as it is. Often, the new generation I see on the production side where I work are the sons of colleagues. Few daughters. It's easy to see how the overwhelmingly white makeup of the business gets perpetuated that way, however I certainly don't fault anyone from wanting to give their child opportunity. I've been blessed to work with both of my daughters in the business for a little while. One just doesn't like the hours we keep and followed a different calling. The other is now a screenwriter.

I don't mean to offer excuses here, just pointing out some of the complications in working towards a more inclusive industry. I'm pleased to see the prominence CCOW is giving your article and hope for lots more discussion.
@David Smith
by Kylee Peña
I'll confess to having been a part of the "not like other girls" institution for a long time. It can be undone!

I agree that reality is difficult and complicated, which is why I wrote specifically to our industry. There's a lot more to opening up jobs and opportunities besides just unlearning your own institutionalized sexism. A lot of needed political, cultural and societal changes that are all woven around each other.

I don't think actively seeking to change your behavior will ultimately hurt the people you work with though, when it really comes down to it. Maybe an issue for less talented people who can't compete when a wider range of professionals enter the circle, but otherwise not so much.

blog: kyleesportfolio.com/blog
twitter: @kyl33t
demo: kyleewall.com
Re: Sexism in Post: Sometimes It's What You Think: Sometimes Not
by Mark Suszko
"Booth babes" and "cheesecake footage" in system demos automatically set off alarm bells for me. It's a very old practice that if the equipment isn't fully capable or the image quality is not up to snuff, the marketers will try to distract you with "eye candy", and since men predominate in the target market, the distraction is usually this sexist stuff. Back in the 70's and 80's, this was even more egregious than you experienced in 2014. Whenever I sat for a demo, if their footage was typical "beach scenes", I would insist the footage be changed over to something else, like nature footage, sports or news, or I would be super-suspicious of what they were trying to "hide" with the distractions.
+2


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It's happened to you. The first cut sounds noisy, has compression artifacts, actors aren't giving their best performances -- and the director has notes about all this and more. Follow along as Sven Pape from "This Guy Edits" works through some of these very issues on the film he's working on, with tips on how deliver exactly what YOUR director is looking for.

Tutorial
Sven Pape
Art of the Edit
Editing Movie Trailers with Patricio Hoter

Editing Movie Trailers with Patricio Hoter

More and more, films that are currently in production are working alongside with their marketing teams to establish a strategy months in advance of its release. That means that there’s more time to explore several options when crafting a trailer, but the workload also becomes heavier, and the stakes become higher. Avid Media Composer editors Christian Jhonson and Patricio Hoter (The Jungle Book, The Last Witch Hunter, Green Room, Titanic 3D, and more) explore this evolving artform.

Tutorial
Christian Jhonson
Art of the Edit
5 Tips for Finding the Right Edit Point

5 Tips for Finding the Right Edit Point

Accomplished editors tend to point to instinct and experience when it comes to the exact edit point. Here are 5 tips from veteran editor Sven Pape of "This Guy Edits" that may help you get there. Some editors say that great editing is invisible. So is the right frame the one we don't notice?

Tutorial
Sven Pape
Art of the Edit
The Surprising Upside Of Procrastination In Film Editing

The Surprising Upside Of Procrastination In Film Editing

What if you wouldn't have to stop procrastinating? Sven Pape of "This Guy Edits" demonstrates how to use procrastination to achieve some of your best film editing work. "Why do I procrastinate?" asks Sven, "I give you Aaron Sorkin who has one of the best procrastination quotes: "You call it procrastination I call it thinking.""

Tutorial
Sven Pape
Art of the Edit
The Secret World of Foley, One of Cinema's Most Magical Arts

The Secret World of Foley, One of Cinema's Most Magical Arts

The Secret World of Foley is an evocative, wordless insight into one of the cinema’s most magical arts: the creative addition of synchronized sound effects in post known as Foley. This short film is also one of the most beautiful things you've seen in a long time. We highly recommend it to any fans of movies, sound, and the inspiration of watching true artists at work.

Feature
Tim Wilson
Art of the Edit
FuseFX & mocha: VFX for Walking Dead, Empire, AHS & More

FuseFX & mocha: VFX for Walking Dead, Empire, AHS & More

The 100+ member team at FuseFX juggles over 30 television episodics a season, while also working on features and commercials. Current credits include: FOX's Empire, ABC's Agents of SHIELD, AMC's The Walking Dead, SyFy's The Magicians, CBS's Zoo, and FX's American Horror Story. Brigitte Bourque, FuseFX's Digital Effects Supervisor and a 20 year industry vet, talks to us about the work that FuseFX does, and how Imagineer Systems mocha fits into their pipeline.

Feature, People / Interview
Imagineer Systems
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