LIBRARY: Tutorials Reviews Interviews Editorials Features Business Authors RSS Feed

Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry

COW Library : NEWS: People in the News : Tim Wilson : Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
CreativeCOW presents Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry --  NEWS: People in the News Editorial


CreativeCOW.net
Palm Springs California USA
CreativeCOW.net. All rights reserved.


Steve Jobs was almost unbelievably young when we met him. We talk about him as a visionary now, but then, they called him a whiz kid, the Boy Wonder: 21 when Apple was founded in 1976, 22 when Apple formally incorporated, 25 for Apple's IPO, and 26 when he first made the cover of Time Magazine. Macintosh shipped when Steve was 28.

A more personal calendar entry: Steve was 24 when he hired my father, who at a "grizzled" 41 became Apple's first Director of Operations.

Because the subsequent Apple logos have become so ubiquitous, most people missed Apple's first logo: Isaac Newton sitting under an Apple tree, with this truly striking quote of Newton's as the motto: "A mind forever voyaging through strange seas of thought - alone."

Wow. The motto for Morton Salt is "When it rains, it pours."

I think that "alone" in the motto refers to Apple making a truly personal computer, rather than something for the institutions that IBM favored. For Apple, "alone" meant separate from other computer companies, but even more so, reflected Steve's vision for Apple: free of attention to market interests, in order to focus on what Apple, alone, thought was worth pursuing -- with Apple, alone, judging its success.

In a 1985 interview, at 29 and still at Apple, Steve said, "[W]e didn't build Mac for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren't going to go out and do market research."

In fact, Steve openly mocked IBM for their reliance on market research, citing it as the primary evidence that they had no pride in their own work. If they did, said Steve, they wouldn't have made PCjr. And what was so wrong with PCjr? "It seems clear to me that they were designing that on the basis of market research for a specific market segment, for a specific demographic type of customer."

While nobody should be held in their 50s to what they said at 29 -- and Steve was surely oversimplifying for effect -- his approach remained remarkably consistent. A 2008 profile of Apple in Fortune observed, "Apple scoffs at the notion of a target market. It doesn't even conduct focus groups. 'You can't ask people what they want if it's around the next corner,' says Steve Jobs."

Is any of this sounding familiar yet? No? How about this: when challenged in that 1985 interview that the new Mac left its entire customer base "with incompatible, out-of-date products," Steve replied that compatibility with the past was "too limiting. [W]e needed a technology that would make the thing radically easier to use and more powerful at the same time, so we had to make a break. We just had to do it."

Let's review. Sacrificing backward compatibly for Apple's own idea of increased simplicity and power. Explicitly rejecting the value of customer input because Apple knows the future and customers don't. Measuring pride in their work by disregard for specific market segments. Serving as the sole judge of their own success.

Now is this sounding familiar?

I don't mean to condense Steve's legacy in this specific market to the observation that, for his entire career, he rejected the very idea of specific markets. That's clearly not entirely the case -- but it's not entirely not the case either. FCPX's incompatibility with the last dozen years of Final Cut Pro, and its development in the apparent absence of meaningful customer input, is completely consistent with what Steve had done from the beginning. Under his leadership, Apple didn't abandon this market any more than they ever embraced it.

In fact, let's take Steve's quote about the origin of the Mac, swap out a couple of letters, and see what we get: "We didn't build FCPX for anybody else. We built it for ourselves. We were the group of people who were going to judge whether it was great or not. We weren't going to go out and do market research."

There's no denying that this approach worked for Apple nearly every single time under Steve. Maybe even this time, eventually. Some of FCP's most enthusiastic advocates have already turned to other NLEs. Some now see decisive evidence that their future and Apple's have diverged so far that they're considering leaving the Mac platform altogether. But others are starting to feel that, with significant further development, FCPX may well be added to Apple's list of successes. Apple will have once again shown that, as exasperating as it can be, the process that Steve pursued is the right one.

So how does an approach that consistently rejects market-specific input keep working? Steve's disregard for continuity with the past and customer expectations for the future freed him to make things the best they could be. And in Steve's mind, for products to be their best, they had to be both simple and beautiful. In that sense, the evolution of FCP to FCPX was inevitable. FCP was capable, yes, but complicated and, frankly, ugly.

In his 2005 commencement address at Stanford, Steve said that he dropped out of Reed College not to stop taking classes, but so that he could ignore required courses in favor of interesting ones. He recalled that Reed had one of the country's great calligraphy programs, and that he saw elegant hand lettering everywhere he turned on campus. "It was beautiful, historical, artistically subtle in a way that science can't capture, and I found it fascinating," which is what led him to take a calligraphy class.

"None of this had even a hope of any practical and application in my life," he continued. "But ten years later when we were designing the first Macintosh computer, it all came back to me, and we designed it all into the Mac. It was the first computer with beautiful typography. If I had never dropped in on that single course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts."

In this case, beauty found its practice, but at the time, beauty was enough. It turns out, he said, that "you can't connect the dots looking forward. You can only connect them looking backwards, so you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future."

He tried connecting the dots forward in his 1985 interview. "It's rare that you see an artist in his 30s or 40s able to really contribute something amazing. Of course, there are some people who are innately curious, forever little kids in their awe of life, but they're rare." Connecting the dots back, Steve arguably achieved all of his greatest artistic successes from 46 to 56: OS X, iPod, the iTunes Music Store, the last two iterations of iMacs, iPhone and iPad to name just a few. In light of those, the original Mac was just a computer.

(And not one as well received as you might have thought. Initial sales were slow because there was no software. The 1984 Industrial Design Excellence Award (IDEA) was not given to the Mac, but to the striking Apple IIc, the fastest-selling computer in history, introduced two months after the Mac, at Apple's, ahem, "Apple II Forever" conference. Swing by YouTube to catch the official music video: "Apple II forever and ever! Bringing the rainbow to you!")

Nobody plans to die at 56. Certainly not anyone who is 56. However, Steve had been thinking about death for a long time. He said that when he was a teen, he read that you should live each day of your life as if it was your last, because one of these days, it will be. His address at Stanford was delivered less than a year after he had been told that he would die in a few months. The cancer proved to be more treatable than first thought, but still, "No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there."

At the same time, he continued, "Death may be Life's finest invention. All external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure -- these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart."

That's why he created beautiful things and expected people to be drawn to them, rather than trying to compete with others chasing the needs of a market. In following his heart, Steve was indeed "A mind forever voyaging through strange seas of thought - alone." Yet not alone, as we were sometimes drawn to join those voyages. Even if quite a few of his individual artistic choices didn't work at all for me, enough of them did that I wouldn't want to have missed a crack at them. He trusted the dots to connect looking forward, and more often than not, they did.

He ended his Stanford commencement address with the benediction from the last page of the final issue of the Whole Earth Catalog: "Stay hungry, stay foolish." Apple Computer was in fact founded on April Fool's Day, and Steve certainly stayed hungry.

Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs, February 24, 1955 - October 5, 2011. He was almost unbelievably young when we met him, and almost unbelievably young when he passed. I'm glad that our time here overlapped for a while, though, and I'll bet that you are too.










Comments

Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Tracy Cao
a great person has changed this world more than general people.
Re: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by walter biscardi
Just came across this Tim, excellent piece of writing. Thanks to you and your dad for sharing.

Walter Biscardi, Jr.
Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
HD Post and Production
Biscardi Creative Media

"This American Land" - our new PBS Series.

Blog Twitter Facebook
+1
Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Chris Harlan
Tim, that was nice, man.
Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Bill Davis
Most of us learn far too late in life what's truly important.

Steve Jobs was a clear exception to that trap.

Tim, thanks so much for sharing this. It's a powerful reminder to all of us to keep asking "what's really important." and "am I getting so bogged down in what I'm conditioned to do - that I might be missing some larger truth that can help me do better."

"Before speaking out ask yourself whether your words are true, whether they are respectful and whether they are needed in our civil discussions."-Justice O'Connor
Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Chris Harlan
[Bill Davis] "Most of us learn far too late in life what's truly important.

Steve Jobs was a clear exception to that trap.
"


After reading his biography, I'd have to say my assessment is nearly the opposite.
Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Kevin Patrick
I just started reading it myself. I have to give Steve credit for deciding to have someone write it. He's always been a fairly private guy and yet this book pretty much tells it like it was. It doesn't seem like anyone pulled any punches in this book.

I give him credit for his passion and his vision, which it seems pretty much stuck with him throughout his career. But I'm not sure I could have worked for him. Or if I did, if I would have lasted.

One thing that surprised me when I was reading it was that Steve, from the very beginning was an anti-Mac Pro guy. Woz wanted to make a computer with expansion slots so users could customize their Apple product. Steve disagreed. He wanted it to be more like an appliance. He drove this passionately with the Macintosh. No user expandable options. In fact, he made sure it was closed up with a tool the average consumer didn't have. (torx I think) I know, I bought a Mac in 1984, replacing my dual floppy IBM PC. When he came back to Apple, he relaunched the Macintosh closed system appliance the iMac.

You'd think that if Apple was going to get rid of an expandable product like the Mac Pro, Steve would have made sure of it.

Yet here we are, after Steve's passing pondering the fate of a computer Steve was not particularly fond of.
Re: Article: Steve Jobs - A Personal Calendar Entry
by Bret Williams
Yup. With Apple being the largest holding in my portfolio, I'm torn. The Mac Pro and Pro Apps aren't doing anything for the company's bottom line. But I can't help feel like getting rid of them would have some sort of a trickle down effect. As if when people bought an Apple iPhone or iPad, they felt like they were buying into a prestige they could previously never afford. Sure Macs were great and awesome, but they were expensive and for designers and musicians. Once they lose that high-end mystique, don't they become just another commodity like Sony? People will wonder why they're so expensive when they're less compatible and made of the same parts as their Windows counterparts. If OS X isn't the choice of the elite, why should they aspire to buy an expensive mini version in an iMac or MacBook? I'd like to believe as a stockholder that Apple ran the numbers and the focus groups to learn that losing the pro apps and machines wouldn't hurt their prestige or business, but Apple has shown that they don't really do that and fly with their gut first. But at this point, the visionary has passed. You can't replace the gut instinct, and Tim Cook's job has to be to do best for the company. It probably was never his goal to make computers he liked fist, and expect others to follow. So he's in a pickle in a sense. He's not Steve, so if he makes decisions based merely on what Tim thinks is good, then he'll be portrayed as going against what Steve established or wanted. But if he surveys the market and makes decisions that way, then he's definitely not doing things the Apple way either. Time will tell.
+1


Recent Articles / Tutorials:
NAB Show
Avid, Adobe, Blackmagic: Talking With Titans at NAB 2018

Avid, Adobe, Blackmagic: Talking With Titans at NAB 2018

As much as each year's NAB Show is about what's completely new, it's about hearing what's new from the industry's most enduring companies. Creative COW Contributing Editor Hillary Lewis sat down with representatives from three of the biggest titan companies in production and post -- Avid's David Colantuoni, Adobe's Laura Williams Argilla, and Blackmagic Design's Dan May -- to discuss the thought process behind their releases, what people might overlook, and their outlooks on the future of the industry.


Hillary Lewis
Adobe After Effects
Fancy Title Animations In Adobe After Effects -- FAST!

Fancy Title Animations In Adobe After Effects -- FAST!

Follow along as VFX guru Tobias Gleissenberger shows you how how to quickly create professional-looking animated text elements using the free presets that are included with Adobe After Effects, customizing them to suit your needs. Tobias will also show you how to apply masks to your text layers to have them appear from behind other elements.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
Cinematography
Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Get The Shot Without Getting Shot: Adventures in Stock Video

Rick Ray of DVArchive has traveled the world, lived in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, played ragtime piano for money in Australian bars, and both been arrested in Ethiopa and recruited those same police to be in his videos the very next day. In his NAB Show presentation for Adobe Stock, Rick gets specific about how to make real money in stock video following your passion around the world, what kind of equipment to choose and avoid, and yes, some advice about talking your way out of trouble.


Cow News
NAB Show
Pure Mission: NAB 2018 Highlights for Video Creatives

Pure Mission: NAB 2018 Highlights for Video Creatives

Everyone who attended NAB this year was on a mission. A mission to create the best content, a mission to deliver content to the right audience, a mission to produce great films for device and theatre viewing. We'll start by discussing some of the best solutions for some of the creative people we know - shooters, production/post folks. And there was plenty of new products, new services, new features announced at the show to get a filmmakers motor running this year. And again SuperMeet was fun, insane and informative. Shoot it, produce it, store it. Then? Sell it. It's all good and getting better!


Andy Marken
NAB Show
NAB 2018: Journey, Connections, and Life-Changing Takeaways

NAB 2018: Journey, Connections, and Life-Changing Takeaways

Many people say that the best thing about the NAB Show is the people, but then their NAB conversations are mostly about products. Thanks to a grant from the Blue Collar Post Collective, longtime Creative COW member, editor, licensed drone operator, podcaster and videographer Hannah Byars-Walker set out to build an NAB experience not around this year's gear, but around the people she'd meet who could change the course of her career, if not her life. This is her inspiring story of what happened next.


Hannah Byars-Walker
Cinematography
Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Go Creative Show: The Cinematography of A Quiet Place

Charlotte Bruus Christensen is the Danish cinematographer behind the lens of the horrifying and beautifully shot film A Quiet Place. Charlotte joins commercial director and Go Creative Show host Ben Consoli to discuss the camera, lighting, and lensing choices for A Quiet Place, its unique sound design and how show created its horrifying yet warm look.


Ben Consoli
NAB Show
The Introvert's Guide to the NAB Show, by Kylee Peña

The Introvert's Guide to the NAB Show, by Kylee Peña

If you're like most people in video production, you're a bit of an introvert, which can make trade shows a challenge. Shyness is real, and social anxiety is its own thing to be managed carefully, but are you selling yourself short before you give yourself a chance to achieve your goals? Creative COW Managing Editor Kylee Peña offers practical steps to help even the shyest creatives make the most of NAB.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Kylee Peña
Could This The Real Reason Apple Wants To Ditch Intel?

Could This The Real Reason Apple Wants To Ditch Intel?

Creative COW's Tim Wilson thinks this is the real reason for Apple's announcement that they will drop Intel. Do You agree?


Creative COW
RED Camera
VFX LEGION: FX ON SCANDAL & HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

VFX LEGION: FX ON SCANDAL & HOW TO GET AWAY WITH MURDER

Shot in LA and set in D.C. and Philly, Scandal & How To Get Away With Murder’s stories unfold in virtual environments that seamlessly blend with live-action footage, defying the viewer’s eye. Here Is some of how it is done using Shotgun, Redshift, The Foundry’s NUKE, Media Shuttle, et al.


Sherri Golden
Adobe After Effects
Remove People from Moving Video in After Effects with Mocha

Remove People from Moving Video in After Effects with Mocha

Learn how to remove a person from a moving video using the Remove module of the Mocha Pro plug-in for Adobe After Effects! In one of his most epic tutorial's yet, Surfaced Studio's Tobias Gleissenberger then adds a bonus Beam Up effect using some of the great filters from the Boris Continuum and Sapphire collections.

Tutorial
Tobias Gleissenberger
MORE
© 2018 CreativeCOW.net All Rights Reserved
[TOP]