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NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution

COW Library : Archiving and Back-Up : Bob Zelin : NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
CreativeCOW presents NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution -- Archiving and Back-Up Editorial


Orlando Florida USA
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The entire post production industry is becoming one giant IT infrastructure. Everything is based on a having a central server where you put your media, and then you do stuff to it - everything from ingesting your media, editing, graphics, audio, managing your media, archiving your media, and ultimately delivering your media. That's it. That's modern post production. And it's all done on your storage arrays. It's a very different world from just 5 years ago.


SHARED STORAGE
Storage and shared storage products were the main product in the south lower hall at NAB. And this is where I stayed the entire 4 days of the show, at the risk of missing all the wonderful things in other exhibit halls. And while there were all kinds of wonderful shared storage products at NAB, the one common thing that shocked me, is that prices are coming down - radically, and these new cheaper products are terrific, and full of features.

Tiger Technology, Small Tree, Studio Network Solutions and ProMAX were outstanding in this area. All three have introduced very inexpensive products that can get the job done, without excuses.

Tiger Technology, the manufacturer of the well-known MetaSAN software, has introduced a turnkey hardware solution called Tbox, which is an all-inclusive shared storage solution for any platform. The Tbox provides the client computers with all the software required to run the shared storage environment, without the need for MetaSAN licenses. It provides integration with the generation of h.264 proxy files, eliminating the need for a third party product. And because it handles both Ethernet and Fibre channel cards to communicate with client computers, running at the fastest speeds is not an issue with Tbox when using 16Gig Fibre channel cards.



Tiger Technology Tbox



Small Tree Communications showed the TitaniumZ-5, a complete portable 4 user shared storage system that has 5 internal SATA drives in a RAID configuration that starts at just over $7000. At the other end of the spectrum, they showed Titanium Extreme, which they demonstrated by connecting TWO 10gig to Thunderbolt adaptors to one single MacBook Pro, running at a shocking speed of 1.2GBytes per second.

ProMAX showed the full range of shared storage products, including a portable system that held 8 internal SATA drives and four Ethernet users, with a starting price of about $8000.

As most shared storage systems demonstrated, many of these products can be configured today with 1gig Ethernet, 10gig Ethernet or Fibre channel cards. The more stuff you add, the more you pay. The more storage you want, the more money it costs.

It is important to remember that many of these very low cost entry level products are not expandable (some are, like the new Studio Network Solutions EVO5), so when you look at these new shared storage solutions, at these super low prices, just be aware that some many not expand as your business grows, and your demands for storage increase with it.

 

THUNDERBOLT
As for conventional storage, Thunderbolt was everywhere. While there are stronger rumors about a new Mac Pro, many people are preparing for the end of conventional PCIe card solutions, and new Thunderbolt storage solutions were everywhere. G-Tech showed a radical new solution using "secret" spinning drives (no details, but NOT solid state) that was still incredibly fast and small. These drives were USB3, but popped into a new G-Tech G-Dock ev, that offers Thunderbolt connectivity, and runs at 250MB/sec with just 2 drives.

When you don't care about small size, and you just want tons of Thunderbolt storage, Maxx Digital showed the ThunderRaid, which is an 8 bay enclosure that uses standard RAID5 and RAID6 hardware. This allows you to do 600MB/sec, with 32TB of storage, all over Thunderbolt.

 

ARCHIVE
Once you have your storage for your editing, graphics, audio or playout systems, you need to prepare for it to all blow up on you, even if it's RAID protected. This is a lesson that I learned the hard way in 2012. Backing up on inexpensive SATA drives, or archiving to LTO tape is becoming a critical thing to have at your business, now that videotape is not longer an option.

For the record, the buzzwords for these are as follows: when you back up to a drive, that is called "backup;" when you backup to an LTO tape, that is called "archive."

I have personally been using LTO tape solutions from Cache-A, and their products are as robust as ever, and their new LTO6 tape solutions hold 2.5 TB per tape. I have normally used single drive solutions, but this year, I looked carefully at the Cache-A Power Cache, that controls a larger LTO tape library. As drive solutions become larger and larger, it is becoming increasingly difficult to do a proper LTO tape archive with a single drive, and the library, while not a glamorous product to own, is becoming more and more important.

As I have personally suffered thru catastrophic failures of shared storage products in 2012, I became very aware of how important LTO archive is. But I also found that many clients still do not want to spend the money that is often required to make this happen.

In my search for low cost LTO archive solutions, I discovered Tolis Group BRU, and their incredible, yet cost effective solutions for LTO Archiving. BRU allows anyone to get a standalone HP Ultrium drive (or drive Library), pop on an ATTO miniSAS card to their computer (or miniSAS to Thunderbolt using a Thunderbolt expansion chassis), and run Tolis Group BRU PE software to allow their computer to do a simple LTO tape archive of their critical data.

[Ed note: be sure to check out Helmut Kobler's review: "Archiving Video With HP's New LTO-6 Ultrium 6250 Tape Drive," which also includes a close look at BRU archiving software.]

And for those that can't be bothered with all these pieces, BRU sells complete packages, with everything that you need included. Tolis Group showed their new ArGest backup and archive solutions, that includes the SATA drive array, AND LTO tape in the same solution, so that you can do backups for nearline storage, as well as LTO tape archive, all in the same package, all using the same BRU software.

Specialty products like Storage DNA offer LTO archive solutions with very tight integration with Avid Media Composer products. For Avid users, Storage DNA has become a standard for archiving their data.

For simple SATA backup solutions, CRU DataPort showed their sledless drive arrays, for eSATA, firewire (and soon Thunderbolt) backup. This means that you hook up the CRU drive array enclosure, just like you would any other drive, and just pop in raw cheap SATA drives into their box - with no screws, no cables, no nothing. You create your backup drive, and then put in on the shelf, just like you would a Beta tape in the old days.

And they even sell little plastic boxes for the drives, so you can treat this just like videotapes - but now, you have drives. No more excuses for not doing backups of your video media!

 

ASSET MANAGEMENT
Once you have all this media on the massive drive arrays that you own, and once you have your stuff backed up to disk or LTO tape, the big question is - WHERE IS ALL MY STUFF? It's become so confusing!

Asset management (the ability to keep track of all your media) has become a critical component in today's post production workflow. Solutions from industry leaders like Avid and EditShare have their own proprietary server solutions - Avid has Interplay, and EditShare has Flow Media Asset Management. But many people just want to add a piece of software.

For the last several years, I have been using SquareBox Systems CatDV, which has become the accepted replacement for Apple's now discontinued Final Cut Server. CatDV works with FCP, as well as Adobe Premiere, and Avid Media Composer.

But a new company, that came out of nowhere (well, not really) is revolutionizing Asset Management. This company is Axle Video, started by the guy that was running the Avid Interplay division. While it currently does not do Avid, it does work with Apple FCP7, FCP X, and Adobe Premiere. Its complete cost for a 5 user workgroup is $1295, and runs on a cheap Mac Mini.


Axle Video
Axle Video multi platform asset management.


It's very easy to learn how to use. More important, it's easy to show your client how, because it's your client that will often be using it. Axle includes the h.264 encoder to make proxy files (you can use Telestream Episode for more efficient Proxy generation), and allows for client review and approval on the web, without the need for a "web client" purchase.

While it is a five user system, if your "users" log in under the same user name, you can have your entire network (all your computers) all access the Axle asset management software, without the need for purchases of client licenses. When you use Axle, you do not load any software on anyone's computer, other than the Mac Mini that you are running Axle on. You just type in the IP address of the Mac Mini in your web browser, and Axle just shows up - with all the media on your shared storage system or drive array, and you go to work.

This is revolutionary for asset management in our industry. It will allow for everyone to get involved in asset management now.

 

COOL LITTLE PRODUCTS
There were so many cool little products at NAB 2013, but Sonnet Technologies really is kicking butt with all of their amazing little boxes. Instead of trying to be "just another storage company," they have embraced Thunderbolt, and how to get "everything else" working with it.

Last year, they introduced the xMac mini, which allows you to put a Mac Mini into a rackmount chassis, and treat it like a Mac Pro, by having integrated PCie expansion slots in the 1 RU box using a Thunderbolt PCIe expander. This year they have introduced a Thunderbolt PCIe expansion chassis with 3 slots (just like the Mac Pro) but with integrated high-power cooling fans, so your boards don't blow up.

And they showed the new Thunderbolt adapter for the Qio line of card readers, so you can now quickly read all your CF, and SSD cards via Thunderbolt, instead of those horrible cheap and slow USB interfaces that are on the market. Another new Sonnet Product was the Echo 15 Thunderbolt Docking Station, which puts all the ports back on the Mac Mini, iMac and Mac Book Pro that Apple took off. It connects via Thunderbolt, gives you back the DVD drive (which can be upgraded to a Blu-ray as well) has space for another internal hard drive in the box, AND it only costs $399! When Apple says "you can't have all that stuff anymore," Sonnet says, "oh yes you can" and for a cheap price -- all via a single Thunderbolt connection.

I was really happy to see Digital Rebellion demonstrate Kollaborate. I use Digital Rebellion Mac utilities all the time, and I know they are a solid company. Kollaborate is a web approval software product that is being sold as a monthly subscription starting at $15 per month, that allows your client to see your edited videos and make instant comments on your edit over the web. Kollaborate uses the Amazon S3 cloud, but they take care of it all. All you do is hand over your 15 bucks, and all the aggregation is done for you.

ATTO Technology showed their entire line of plug and play Thunderbolt ThunderLink and ThunderStream adaptors, that lets any iMac, Mac Mini, or MacBook Pro interface with hi-speed 10Gb Ethernet connections, standard miniSAS drive arrays, or LTO drive products.

Intel introduced the "next gen" Thunderbolt, which is twice the speed of Apple's current Thunderbolt connection (20Gb per second). I told many people that it was not backwards compatible with existing Thunderbolt, but I was wrong - it IS backwards compatible. I just can't keep up!

 

AJA
AJA showed lots of stuff, but the ROI was one of my favorite new products introduced at NAB. The ROI is a $995 scan converter for DVI and HDMI computer outputs. It converts all the wacky computer frame rates out to ANY video standard (1080i, 720p, and everything else). ROI means "region of interest" which allows you to lasso the area you want converted on your computer, and it scales it to full screen, converts it to the resolution that you want, and spits it out to a BNC output to feed you video switcher or router.

And yes, it embeds the audio.


Left, the AJA Hi5-4K; Right, the ROI scan converter.

AJA also showed the KiStor dock, which allows you to take your Ki Pro drives, and stick them into something easy to unload the data via Thunderbolt, so you are not tying up your Ki Pro. And it's only $599. And all AJA cards are now compatible with Pro Tools!



AJA KiStor


Another incredible AJA breakthrough product was the Hi5-4K, which takes a professional 4K HD-SDI signal with all 4 BNC connectors, and turns it into an HDMI 1.4 signal, so you will be able to see your amazing 4K image on inexpensive consumer 4K monitors that are about to be released. How much? $595!

 

BLACKMAGIC DESIGN
Well, they are just crazy, but you already knew this.

Everyone is talking about the new 4K camera for $3995, and the 1K camera for $995, so I won't bore you with this. And yeah, they had a $2000 4K switcher, and $2000 4K recorder.



Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera


But are we really involved with 4K multicamera production yet? In the real world, they showed the Blackmagic MultiDock for the HyperDeck Studio products, which (like the AJA Ki Pro dock) will let you pop your SSD cards into this, and offload via Thunderbolt, and not tie up your HyperDeck. It holds 4 SSD cards, and costs only $599.



Blackmagic MultiDock


What really blew me away is the new ATEM Studio Converter. FINALLY, an intercom system that is complete, and doesn't cost a fortune of money! And it does a lot more than intercom. The ATEM Studio converter is part of the ATEM Camera converter system, which uses a Fibre cable out to the cameras, and transits not only the HD-SDI video signal (or HDMI signal from the camera) but two balanced XLR audio signals, and tally, AND the intercom system.



Blackmagic Design ATEM Studio Converter [back] and Camera Converter in front with headset.


But instead of the horrible Apple iPhone headsets, which were a joke, now there is a real control panel, with real buttons that you can talk to your camera operators, with a real gooseneck microphone, a real speaker that you can hear them with, and if you want phones, real high quality aviation headsets. They had the amazing Bose aviation headset which has the incredible ability to silence outside room noise (including the entire NAB show floor noise).

The box is a 4 input system, and if you want 8 or 12 cameras, just daisy chain the boxes together with Short BNC cables. $1995 each box - compare that to Clear Com or RTS!!!

There are only two problems with this product: 1) it's not RTS or Clear Com compatible; and 2) it's only a single channel unit, so if you want IFB back to your talent, the ATEM Studio Converter can't do it.

Blackmagic also released the SmartScope Duo scopes, which is a waveform monitor, vectorscope, audio meter, HD monitor in a dual monitor configuration for $995 retail.



SmartScope Duo


Take that Tektronix. How are you going to sell a $10,000 scope now? Oh, and DaVinci Resolve now has native editing software built into it. How can you beat a single booth like this? Well, you can.....



Blackmagic Design 4K Cinema Camera


ADOBE ANYWHERE
Adobe Anywhere: oh boy, the #1 product at the show, the product that will change the industry forever. The reality that Adobe Anywhere will one day actually work, and be readily available to everyone at a reasonable cost, and at that time it will put people like me, who build small facilities out of business.






Adobe Anywhere was the most important product at NAB 2013 - more amazing than the Blackmagic 4K camera, or anyone else's product. The reality that "one day soon" (and "one day" right now for CNN) that you can be in Iraq with a WiFi Connection and can access your company server's 4K media and edit it over WiFi, and don't need any other equipment - well that just makes me sick.

Anyone that can afford it will buy Adobe Anywhere, and anyone that has Adobe Anywhere will never use any other editing software other than what Adobe provides - even if they hate it - because Adobe Anywhere is just too important of a product. Once your facility owns Adobe Anywhere, everyone can do everything, all at full media resolution, on a laptop sitting at Starbucks Coffee.

It works by streaming the video to you, not by creating proxy files. All you need is the server setup that is powerful enough to feed your users. As this product becomes more accessible to the regular production and post production companies, the only products that will survive will be the ones that tie in with Adobe Anywhere.

I can foresee that the model of the old post production facility will embrace Adobe Anywhere - at any cost - to convince smaller companies to let them maintain their media (on their servers, archive systems and asset management) so that the client can just "log in" via WiFi, and do their full 4K editing, and ultimately deliver to that TV station or client (via Aspera or Signiant, who were both the hit of digital delivery at NAB 2013). The giant "post house" will maintain a large Adobe Anywhere server, which they will allow their clients to use, and all the production companies will say "all we need are these laptops and an AJA T-Tap or Blackmagic Mini Monitor - we don't have to buy any more equipment ever again".

So, will Adobe take over the world? I think so.

 

 

Blue Ribbon Awards. There were many great evolutionary products at NAB, but these are the ones that will revolutionize their parts of the market:

Asset Management - Axle Video
Test Equipment - Blackmagic SmartScope Duo Scopes

 

Revolutionizing the entire world: Adobe Anywhere








Comments

Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Clay Couch
Adobe anywhere sounds much like the cloud gaming system that was supposed to take over gaming. Never again were gamers going to need $5,000 gaming rigs. Well Nvidia and AMD are still making expensive video cards, so if that tells you anything.... The technology will get there and I totally agree with you that Adobe will rule the world in post production that is for sure. Seems this technology is too important to have one company own it. It would almost be like one company owning the internet.

Anyway thanks much for the write up. Very well done!

Clay Couch
Studio Macula LLC
3D animator/compositor
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Richard Dolesh
Bob, Thanks so much for a very concise summary fused with your perspective. Which is one of the reasons I enjoy reading your reviews!

Richard Dolesh


Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Glenn Sakatch
Excellent wrap up Bob, thanks.

I am looking into LTO solutions. Current facility has Cache, i'm wondering about the BRU solution, using a computer and a SAS card.

How much is the actual computer processor going to affect the transfers. (do i need a wicked fast computer) or am I ok as long as i have a proper SAS card, and decent hard drives inside for the transfer?

Glenn
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Eric Hansen
LTO-5 drives can go 135MB/s. LTO-6 is even faster. It's most important to have a good ATTO card (H680 or R680) and fast storage to feed the drives. I'm running a BRU backup right now on a Mac Pro and it looks like it's using a single core for the backup. So barely a blip processor-wise.

e

Eric Hansen
Production Workflow Designer / Consultant / Colorist / DIT
http://www.erichansen.tv
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Kevin Francis
Glenn-

You might also check out PreRollPost from Imagine Products. It's basically a front end for LTFS that makes LTFS work like its supposed to on a Mac. Functionally very similar to BRU but your archives are stored in an industry standard format that nearly all the archive software companies support. And your archive database is stored in MySQL, also a standard. Check it out.

Kevin

Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Bob Zelin
Dom writes -

One thing to keep in mind about AnyWhere or even Avid's Sphere there are currently many logistic roadblocks.
For example, how do you get your hi-res footage (DNX, ProRes, even XDCAM 50) from the field to AnyWhere with just a wi-fi connect?

Hi Dom,
you don't ingest with Adobe Anywhere. The ingest happens at the facility (like MPE !). Once it is ingested on the server, the client can remote in, and the video is STREAMED to the client. So the client is not trying to see 30MB/sec ProRes422HQ or DNxHD220 in full resolution - they are seeing a streaming video of this media, not the full res media. How is this done - I don't know (I guess that is the secret of Adobe Anywhere). So you watch the stream (which is NOT an h.264 proxy), you edit the media, and it lives on the original server. If you are in the field (across country), you CANNOT ingest new media into Adobe Anywhere - you can just edit media that is living on the server. So they would (theoretically) fly dailies from a RED shoot to LA or NY, you and your crew would ingest (and possibly color grade) the media, and now the client could see this media over wifi as streaming video.

At least this is how I understand it. I guess AVID Sphere is the same concept.

Bob

@Bob Zelin
by David Jahns
As I understand it, the viewing / editing stream *IS* an on-the-fly h264 proxy, generated from the HiRes media in real time - the CUDA cores cranking out the real time encoding.

So, you are working with the full media & timecode, and when you pause playback, you should see every pixel (if your screen can show it at 100%), but when watching the timeline play, you will get an H264 stream at whatever bandwidth the server & connection can handle. Probably like 1/4 res, I would imagine.

David Jahns
---
Joint Editorial
Portland, OR
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Walter Soyka
[Bob Zelin] "you don't ingest with Adobe Anywhere. The ingest happens at the facility (like MPE !)."

Bob, I missed NAB this year, so please correct me if this information is now out of date -- but check out this article from IBC by John Montgomery from fxguide:

New Tech: Adobe Anywhere [link]

I quote:
"The system definitely relies on a good bandwidth connection between the editor and the server (how else could you upload gigs of data?), but one thing Adobe wanted to make sure was that using Anywhere did not hold back work on an edit while footage was uploading. So, a remote editor can import the footage locally into the project, and start editing with their local files immediately while they are transferred to the server in the background."


Walter Soyka
Principal & Designer at Keen Live
Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
RenderBreak Blog - What I'm thinking when my workstation's thinking
Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Drew Lahat
Walter,
This looks like an old article, before Adobe really knew what they'd be doing in Anywhere :-) For example there's no mentioning of After Effects. REST API also became a must and not just an option (Anywhere won't see any footage without integrating with a REST-compliant DAM system). Adobe also pushed using Anywhere over the internet for months, but version 1 won't be qualified for that.

As for the uploading, I suspect the feature they mentioned in the article has been pulled. Especially the words "we’ll transfer it up". I think the most you'll be able to do is use Prelude to ingest & transcode while delivering it via FTP to your central storage. Once it's there and your DAM sees it, it will become available in Anywhere. This has more to do with Prelude than Anywhere, though. There's really no revolutionary workflow to get your off-site footage to the storage, Anywhere is a "from the center out" architecture.

What they referred to in the article is the ability to edit local footage alongside Anywhere-cloud footage. So you could work on your footage locally just as you do now. I do wonder how well conforming between Anywhere and local footage would work in the first version, though.

I think we should take this discussion out of this article and to the Adobe forum, though :-)
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Dom Silverio
Hi Bob

Dom from MPE.

One thing to keep in mind about AnyWhere or even Avid's Sphere there are currently many logistic roadblocks.

For example, how do you get your hi-res footage (DNX, ProRes, even XDCAM 50) from the field to AnyWhere with just a wi-fi connect?

For facilities, you will need to provide the I/O internet bandwidth. Pray for Google Fiber.


It is interesting but products like these might just be too much ahead of the curve.
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Bob Zelin
CRU -
http://www.cru-inc.com/products/RTX-Wizard.php

CRU sledless arrays
by Drew Lahat
Bob, do you have any more information about the sledless drive arrays from CRU? I was unable to find a single bit of info about it on CRU's site or elsewhere.
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Kim Rowley
Thanks for letting us go through your "jewlery box". Especially interested in Kollaborate and the BM intercom system. Will look further at these gems. Thanks for being there at NAB for those of us that couldn't attend.
Cheers!

2x 2.4 GHz Quad-Core Intel Xeon 12GB RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5770, Xserve RAID, AJA IO, 2 Cinema Display, FCP Studio 3 (7.0.3), OS X10.6.5
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Bob Zelin
SANs (and NAS') are dramatically easier to setup than years ago, and the most important thing to remember is that you DO NOT need an IT person on staff to maintain any of these systems (unless you have XSAN or StorNext).
A little phone support twice a year will keep you up and running with any of these modern systems.

As for comments on Adobe Anywhere, I am still really confused as to how it actually "does it". Being an engineer, if I want to stay employed in the future, learning how to do this will be critical for my career in tne next few years.

Bob

@Bob Zelin
by David Jahns
I talked with Adobe a few months ago about it. It's a great idea - the high-res media media lives on the server, which is loaded with powerful GPUs and CUDA cores, and when a remote user logs in an hits play, the high-res media is h264 compressed and streamed to Adobe Premiere at whatever bandwidth it can take. It may drop your viewing resolution as needed, but as soon as you hit pause, you get the full 1080 frame on your laptop - so you're not working with low-res media.

THis is all great, but how many 1080 streams can those GPUs & Cudas handle at once? I'll bet it will be fantastic for small groups, but medium to large groups? Will there be lag on the user's end? Can you set up multiple servers to all access the same media, etc.?

Don't worry - we'll need you around for quite a while longer! ;-)

David Jahns
---
Joint Editorial
Portland, OR
Re: @Bob Zelin
by John Heagy
[David Jahns] " the high-res media media lives on the server, which is loaded with powerful GPUs and CUDA cores, and when a remote user logs in an hits play, the high-res media is h264 compressed and streamed to Adobe Premiere at whatever bandwidth it can take"

Correct, except that the HiRez media sits on any storage not the AnyWhere server, tho it does have cache. The AnyWhere server will require full bandwidth playback of the HiRez in order to deliver smooth playback to remote clients.

The question about what is the limit... that's easy... it will be your storage. Not only does your HiRez storage have to deliver full bandwidth to your conform jobs, it will now have to deliver the same bandwidth to the AnyWhere server, thrashing it about with every remote LoRez media request.

John
@Bob Zelin
by Drew Lahat
Hi Bob,
Our facility has been working with Adobe over the past half year, and as soon as I heard of Anywhere back then my ears perked up - I agree that it's the most exciting news in editing in years, alongside FCPX and Lightworks though.

I'm sure Adobe is aware that they need to make the server(s) scalable. It'll just be an issue of matching connected users to CPU and GPU resources. If one Kepler GPU can serve perhaps 1-3 users, you get 5-25 users in a box, and once they figure out scalability, you'll add more boxes...

Storage simply hooks up via whatever fast interface you put between it and the server - fiber, 10GigE, etc. I suspect the winner will be direct-attached SAS, because if Anywhere is the only one that accesses raw media, who needs a SAN?

Do note that the current generation of Anywhere needs a DAM in place, and it interacts with your media only through the DAM. So new footage gets copied to your storage, the DAM takes notice, and then Anywhere becomes aware of it.

Also I was excited about its project sharing mechanism ("no more bin locking!") but it seems that changes do not apply live (like in Lightworks). Instead you rely on a "share" button that presents a "change list" and asks you to commit or resolve any conflicts. I'm just imagining two users modifying the same bin - sure you then get to decide who wins, but that doesn't solve the problem; if the both modified the bin they probably had good reason to do so and I don't just want to discard one's work.
@Drew Lahat
by Drew Lahat
....aaand one more issue that really needs to be addressed, is that there's currently no way to view your footage NOT through Anywhere. Everything always gets transcoded to H.264 before you see it.
How do you online, or QC? I think that finishing requires a way to view the footage in its editorial codec before you sign off on it and before you export that final master file.
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by David Jahns
I agree Adobe Anywhere is the biggest game changer we've seen in years. I'm curious where it will hit its' limits in term of performance.

Real time streaming video, right? I'll bet it's amazing with 1 user logged in. How about 5, 20, 50? Is the server expandable enough to keep adding more processing power to scale up?

David Jahns
---
Joint Editorial
Portland, OR
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Dan Herrick
Great info! I liked your comment on how "anyone that has Adobe Anywhere will never use any other editing software other than what Adobe provides - even if they hate it - because Adobe Anywhere is just too important". It goes to show that connectivity is the keystone to all future editing.

How do you solve the issue of sending the files to the central hub though? If you have numerous cameras around the world do you have to edit the footage you shoot on your own computer or do you upload it to the central hub then edit the proxies/stream?

Am I trying to centralize my editing from many different camera/editors so they can just concentrate on shooting for my business. I have yet to find a solution.

Thanks for your insights!

Dan Herrick
Creative Director
Sleepingbeagle Studios
(780) 700-0937
Edmonton, AB
Canada
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Al Bergstein
Bob, I've not worked with SAN's for a few years, but they were significantly complex to setup and especially to troubleshoot. Have their been real advancements to allow folks that don't have a lot of MacOS/Linux/Windows low level OS knowledge configure and manage the systems? Or is this still where any company entering SANs, would need to have an IT person that was way more knowledgeable than the average server jockey (which often seems to be someone with more application skills than OS skills). Or have I missed some changes since the middle part of the last decade?

Al
Re: NAB 2013: Bob Zelin: The Evolution & Revolution
by Sareesh Sudhakaran
Excellent write-up. Thanks for putting it together.

Looks like computers are going extinct - only tablets and servers now!

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NAB Expo
NAB 2013: Day Three With Ryan Salazar

NAB 2013: Day Three With Ryan Salazar

Wrapping up day three of NAB with Ryan Salazar finds a look at GoPro, Blackmagic 4K Production Camera, Adobe, Pelican Cases, Induro and more.

Editorial, Feature
Ryan Salazar
NAB Expo
NAB 2013: Day Four With Ryan Salazar

NAB 2013: Day Four With Ryan Salazar

Only Ryan's own words suffice, "WOW! Has this been a SPECTACULAR Show or what?!?! It was intense... I interviewed Vince Pace of the Cameron | Pace Group and Marc Hamaker of Autodesk, among many others during the Show! I feasted my eyes upon so many wonderful innovations that I can't wait for them to be released throughout the coming year! I had my own TV Crew, courtesy of NAB LIVE! 2013, and I came face-to-face with a shark! It was all I had hoped for and definitely MORE!"

Editorial, Feature
Ryan Salazar
AVID
NAB 2013: Avid Everywhere

NAB 2013: Avid Everywhere

At NAB 2013, Avid introduced its new President/CEO Louis Hernandez, Jr., who has been associated with Avid as a board member and lead director. He discussed Avid Everywhere, an end-to-end workflow that enables creative to work anywhere, as "a concept that has been shaping our product strategy." New product introductions included Interplay Production 3.0, Media Composer 7.0 and Pro Tools 11, the latter rewritten from the ground up.

Editorial, Feature, People / Interview
Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
NAB 2013: Autodesk Expands Its Reach

NAB 2013: Autodesk Expands Its Reach

This year, Autodesk comes to NAB 2013 not simply as a successful company in the professional content creation space, but a player in the consumer market as well. SketchBook alone has 15+ million users and the use of Smoke has also now reached thousands of new customers. On the professional side, the newly debuted Autodesk Entertainment Creation Suite 2014 includes updated versions of Maya, 3ds Max, MotionBuilder, Mudbox, Softimage and Sketchbook Designer. Autodesk has also announced partnerships with Blackmagic Design and Technicolor.

Editorial, Feature
Debra Kaufman
NAB Expo
NAB 2013: Blackmagic Design Debuts an UltraHD Workflow

NAB 2013: Blackmagic Design Debuts an UltraHD Workflow

At the Blackmagic Design, UltraHD/4K reigned supreme. The company not only introduced a 4K camera, the Blackmagic Production Camera, but a range of products that create an entire UltraHD workflow. Blackmagic Design has been focusing on 6G-SDI technology for multiple products including the ATEM Production Studio 4K live production studio, Blackmagic Audio Monitor and ATEM Studio Converter 2, all of which support UltraHD resolution. In addition, Blackmagic introduced its Pocket Cinema Camera, a compact Super 16 digital cinema camera with 13 stops of dynamic range, and DaVinci Resolve 10, both priced under $1,000.

Editorial, Feature
Debra Kaufman
ARRI
NAB 2013: ARRI Upgrades Alexa & Shows Off Anamorphic Lenses

NAB 2013: ARRI Upgrades Alexa & Shows Off Anamorphic Lenses

ARRI made good on its promise to plan a long-life path for Alexa; at NAB 2013, the company offered the XR Module and several components of the Alexa XT configuration as upgrades. The first three focal lengths of the ARRI/ZEISS Master Anamorphic lens series are slated to ship next month, and ARRI showed a 10-minute film shot with the 50 mm MA50 lens. Also on tap were Pro Camera Accessories for the Sony F5/F55, new Alura LDS Extenders, lightweight matte box LMB-6, and the new Cage System II.

Editorial, Feature
Debra Kaufman
Canon Cameras
NAB 2013: Canon Demonstrates 4K Workflow, Intros New Cameras

NAB 2013: Canon Demonstrates 4K Workflow, Intros New Cameras

Canon highlighted an end-to-end 4K workflow at NAB 2013, showing a digital intermediate suite and a live 4K broadcast with "Ultra-Zoom" applications. The company also debuted two new, entry-level professionals video cameras, the XA25 and XA20. The cameras feature Canon's first-ever Organic LED (OLED) touch panels, weigh 2.6 pounds and are priced at under $3,000. Canon also announced that it's begun development on a new 35mm prime lens for large-format single-sensor cameras employing Super 35mm, full-frame 35mm, and APS-C size imagers.

Editorial, Feature
Debra Kaufman
Cinematography
NAB 2013: Anton/Bauer

NAB 2013: Anton/Bauer

Anton/Bauer came to NAB 2013 to celebrate its Scientific and Engineering Award from AMPAS earlier in the year...and to introduce three new products: the Anton/Bauer Gold Spectrum Wireless Series, the result of a collaboration with sister Vitec company Integrated Microwave Technologies; the DIONIC HD battery, aimed at use with some of today's high-end digital cameras; and the PowerCharger 3000 Series of three new chargers.

Editorial, Feature
Debra Kaufman
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